General Category > Yeast and Fermentation

Wyeast 1728 Scottish Ale

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darren:
Wouldn't it have something to do with the malting process?  Back 200 years ago, they would have used peat to fire the furnaces and kiln the grain.  All of the malt would have been slightly, but unintentionally, peat smoky, right?

denny:

--- Quote from: darren on July 01, 2011, 05:49:42 PM ---Wouldn't it have something to do with the malting process?  Back 200 years ago, they would have used peat to fire the furnaces and kiln the grain.  All of the malt would have been slightly, but unintentionally, peat smoky, right?

--- End quote ---

I'm not sure that's something that could be proven.  At least, I've never seen any solid evidence of it.

thomasbarnes:

--- Quote from: darren on July 01, 2011, 05:49:42 PM ---Wouldn't it have something to do with the malting process?  Back 200 years ago, they would have used peat to fire the furnaces and kiln the grain.  All of the malt would have been slightly, but unintentionally, peat smoky, right?

--- End quote ---

By the early 19th century, improved indirectly heated kilns meant that malt didn't pick up (much) smoke character, regardless of the fuel used. Also, by that time, brewers were doing everything they could to avoid smoky character in their beer, since it was considered to be a fault. For example, in the early 18th century (~300 years ago), one of the reasons why porter was aged was to give time for the smoke character (from "blown" brown malt) to drop a bit.

That said, anything is possible. Locally-produced malt used for privately-brewed ("house brewed") beer could have had some peat character, but I can't imagine that the big Scottish breweries in Alloa, Edinburgh and elsewhere would have welcomed it.

More to the point, Scottish "shilling ales" and "wee heavy" are based on late 20th century examples. By that time, there was no way that Scottish brewers were using peat in their maltings, nor were they using water with a peat character in their brewing. It would be about as likely as one of the big Munich breweries "accidentally" using beechwood smoked rauchmalt in one of their lagers.

thcipriani:

--- Quote from: denny on June 01, 2011, 10:16:50 PM ---
--- Quote from: thomasbarnes on June 01, 2011, 09:37:50 PM ---
--- Quote from: bonjour on May 29, 2011, 04:27:32 PM ---This yeast can throw a very nice low smoke phenolic,  Great for Scottish/Strong Scotch Ales. 
--- End quote ---

This must be the origin of the "peated Scottish ale" myth.

--- End quote ---

That's what I attribute it to, but Kris England (IIRC) has done some research relating it to the water used.

--- End quote ---

I've seen that - here:
http://forum.northernbrewer.com/viewtopic.php?f=4&t=45877&start=15

I just got back from Scotland and the water didn't have any sort of peat character that I could taste, although, admittedly, I didn't get much into the highlands. Caledonian and Belhaven had nothing I would call peaty - the were just clean, with a subdued caramel sweetness, they were dry and malt-forward beers. Jamil's Scottish recipe actually gets you pretty close. I have no idea where this idea originated - I just wish any reference to any smoke perception would get out of the guidelines. I hate judging this category and then in MBOS you get an "Other smoked beer" from the other side of the table.

denny:

--- Quote from: thcipriani on July 08, 2011, 02:47:47 AM ---I just wish any reference to any smoke perception would get out of the guidelines.
--- End quote ---

A-Freakin-Men!

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