General Category > Yeast and Fermentation

Wyeast 1728 Scottish Ale

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Kinetic:
How does 1728 do at warmer temps?  I see Wyeast states 75F as the upper temperature limit and everyone seems to ferment this one cool. 

I don't have temperature control, but I have a chilly basement.  The ambient temps should be a steady 66-67F.  The beer will be a 7% IPA.  Guessing the fermentation temps would be 70-72.  I can pitch colder than ambient. 

I don't mind fruity esters, but would like to avoid fusels.  Anyone ever use 1728 in the low 70s?

bengelbrau:
1728 is a very vigorous fermenter. The first time I used it was at 60, and the inside of my refrigerator looked like a failed 5th grade science experiment within 36 hours.

Kinetic:
I use an 8 gallon bucket with a 5-6 gallon batch.  A blow off tube necessity is rare even with a big starter and plenty of pure O2, but I'll keep an eye on it, thanks.

klickitat jim:
1728 is my house yeast. I use it for Scottish, APA, IPA, Northern English Brown, ESB, etc. Its clean at 50-58, starts getting an English (UK) fruity ester above 58. Im running a Scottish 80/- and an APA on it right now at 62ยบ.

I never get anything that resembles smoke from it. I firmly beleive that is an old wives tale that isn't allowed to die. Based on about 9 months and 30 or so batches at varying temps and grist bills. If someone is getting a hint of smoke from 1728 I'm convinced its due to trying to find it too hard.

mabrungard:

--- Quote from: klickitat jim on June 08, 2014, 08:31:28 PM ---I never get anything that resembles smoke from it. I firmly beleive that is an old wives tale that isn't allowed to die. Based on about 9 months and 30 or so batches at varying temps and grist bills. If someone is getting a hint of smoke from 1728 I'm convinced its due to trying to find it too hard.

--- End quote ---

Jim, I was inclined to call it a bigfoot myth. But I have experienced it ONCE. One of my good friends brewed a 60 and it definitely threw a very light smokey phenol and he had no use of smoked grain in the grist. It was a lovely compliment to that beer. He has since tried several times to replicate that yeast-derived smokiness with NO success. I don't know how to coax that yeast into producing that phenol, but I do know it's capable.

I'll welcome anyone's guidance on what conditions help that yeast to throw that phenol.

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