General Category > Yeast and Fermentation

Wyeast 1728 Scottish Ale

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HoosierBrew:
I've never noticed the smokey phenol with 1728 ,and I've used it a bunch. But almost always maybe between 58 - 62F where it's pretty clean.

jeffy:
A lot of folks will identify a smokey taste from the slightest bit of scorched malt in the bottom of the mash tun or kettle. 
I just had a homebrew at our club meeting that several people thought had a smoke flavor, but to me it was more burnt.  Turned out the brewer confessed that he had scorched a bit of grain.

erockrph:

--- Quote from: jeffy on June 09, 2014, 12:48:01 AM ---A lot of folks will identify a smokey taste from the slightest bit of scorched malt in the bottom of the mash tun or kettle. 
I just had a homebrew at our club meeting that several people thought had a smoke flavor, but to me it was more burnt.  Turned out the brewer confessed that he had scorched a bit of grain.

--- End quote ---

I have long suspected that either kettle caramelization, roast barley, or the combination of the two is responsible for this smoky note. I'm not saying that it couldn't be directly from the yeast, but there are just so many other possible process- or ingredient-related sources of this flavor that I feel those are way more likely. A clean-fermenting ale yeast combined with a simple recipe leave nothing to hide behind that might otherwise mask this character.

klickitat jim:
I'll keep a more open mind to it scince Martin says he experienced it once, but so far I have not.

chumley:
Count me as another who has never got any smoky ester from 1728.

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