General Category > Yeast and Fermentation

Wyeast 1728 Scottish Ale

<< < (2/11) > >>

gordonstrong:
I typically use it around 58F.  Worked well to ferment a very strong Scotch ale (1130-1140), so it can handle alcohol too.  I like it.

brewallday:
It worked really well for me in a rye pale ale.  The yeast lets the hops come through but still retains some maltiness in my experience with it.

thomasbarnes:

--- Quote from: bonjour on May 29, 2011, 04:27:32 PM ---This yeast can throw a very nice low smoke phenolic,  Great for Scottish/Strong Scotch Ales. 
--- End quote ---

This must be the origin of the "peated Scottish ale" myth.

denny:

--- Quote from: thomasbarnes on June 01, 2011, 09:37:50 PM ---
--- Quote from: bonjour on May 29, 2011, 04:27:32 PM ---This yeast can throw a very nice low smoke phenolic,  Great for Scottish/Strong Scotch Ales. 
--- End quote ---

This must be the origin of the "peated Scottish ale" myth.

--- End quote ---

That's what I attribute it to, but Kris England (IIRC) has done some research relating it to the water used.

thomasbarnes:

--- Quote from: denny on June 01, 2011, 10:16:50 PM ---
--- Quote from: thomasbarnes on June 01, 2011, 09:37:50 PM ---This must be the origin of the "peated Scottish ale" myth.

--- End quote ---

That's what I attribute it to, but Kris England (IIRC) has done some research relating it to the water used.

--- End quote ---

I could easily see it being a combination of water (minerally notes being taken as "earthy"), plus yeast strain (low levels of phenols, possibly plus earthy notes).

I'm just surprised that Greg Noonan missed this fact in his book "Scottish Ales."

Do anyone know the precise conditions which cause the yeast to produce earthy and/or smoky notes?

Navigation

[0] Message Index

[#] Next page

[*] Previous page

Go to full version