Author Topic: Wyeast 1728 Scottish Ale  (Read 4759 times)

Offline Kinetic

  • Brewer
  • ****
  • Posts: 270
    • View Profile
Re: Wyeast 1728 Scottish Ale
« Reply #15 on: June 08, 2014, 10:44:44 AM »
How does 1728 do at warmer temps?  I see Wyeast states 75F as the upper temperature limit and everyone seems to ferment this one cool. 

I don't have temperature control, but I have a chilly basement.  The ambient temps should be a steady 66-67F.  The beer will be a 7% IPA.  Guessing the fermentation temps would be 70-72.  I can pitch colder than ambient. 

I don't mind fruity esters, but would like to avoid fusels.  Anyone ever use 1728 in the low 70s?

Offline bengelbrau

  • Assistant Brewer
  • ***
  • Posts: 100
    • View Profile
Re: Wyeast 1728 Scottish Ale
« Reply #16 on: June 08, 2014, 12:00:08 PM »
1728 is a very vigorous fermenter. The first time I used it was at 60, and the inside of my refrigerator looked like a failed 5th grade science experiment within 36 hours.

Offline Kinetic

  • Brewer
  • ****
  • Posts: 270
    • View Profile
Re: Wyeast 1728 Scottish Ale
« Reply #17 on: June 08, 2014, 12:05:04 PM »
I use an 8 gallon bucket with a 5-6 gallon batch.  A blow off tube necessity is rare even with a big starter and plenty of pure O2, but I'll keep an eye on it, thanks.

Offline klickitat jim

  • Official Poobah of No Life.
  • *
  • Posts: 4793
    • View Profile
Re: Wyeast 1728 Scottish Ale
« Reply #18 on: June 08, 2014, 01:31:28 PM »
1728 is my house yeast. I use it for Scottish, APA, IPA, Northern English Brown, ESB, etc. Its clean at 50-58, starts getting an English (UK) fruity ester above 58. Im running a Scottish 80/- and an APA on it right now at 62º.

I never get anything that resembles smoke from it. I firmly beleive that is an old wives tale that isn't allowed to die. Based on about 9 months and 30 or so batches at varying temps and grist bills. If someone is getting a hint of smoke from 1728 I'm convinced its due to trying to find it too hard.

Offline mabrungard

  • Senior Brewmaster
  • ******
  • Posts: 1391
    • View Profile
    • Bru'n Water
Re: Wyeast 1728 Scottish Ale
« Reply #19 on: June 08, 2014, 02:37:19 PM »
I never get anything that resembles smoke from it. I firmly beleive that is an old wives tale that isn't allowed to die. Based on about 9 months and 30 or so batches at varying temps and grist bills. If someone is getting a hint of smoke from 1728 I'm convinced its due to trying to find it too hard.

Jim, I was inclined to call it a bigfoot myth. But I have experienced it ONCE. One of my good friends brewed a 60 and it definitely threw a very light smokey phenol and he had no use of smoked grain in the grist. It was a lovely compliment to that beer. He has since tried several times to replicate that yeast-derived smokiness with NO success. I don't know how to coax that yeast into producing that phenol, but I do know it's capable.

I'll welcome anyone's guidance on what conditions help that yeast to throw that phenol.
Martin B
Carmel, IN

BJCP National
Foam Blowers of Indiana (FBI)

Brewing Water Information at:
https://sites.google.com/site/brunwater/

Like Bru'n Water on Facebook for occasional discussions on brewing water and Bru'n Water
https://www.facebook.com/pages/Brun-Water/464551136933908

Online HoosierBrew

  • Official Poobah of No Life.
  • *
  • Posts: 6188
  • Indianapolis,IN
    • View Profile
Re: Wyeast 1728 Scottish Ale
« Reply #20 on: June 08, 2014, 03:38:12 PM »
I've never noticed the smokey phenol with 1728 ,and I've used it a bunch. But almost always maybe between 58 - 62F where it's pretty clean.
Jon H.

Offline jeffy

  • I spend way too much time on the AHA forum
  • ********
  • Posts: 2822
  • Tampa, Fl
    • View Profile
Re: Wyeast 1728 Scottish Ale
« Reply #21 on: June 08, 2014, 05:48:01 PM »
A lot of folks will identify a smokey taste from the slightest bit of scorched malt in the bottom of the mash tun or kettle. 
I just had a homebrew at our club meeting that several people thought had a smoke flavor, but to me it was more burnt.  Turned out the brewer confessed that he had scorched a bit of grain.
Jeff Gladish, Tampa (989.3, 175.1 Apparent Rennarian)
Homebrewing since 1990
AHA member since 1991, now a lifetime member
BJCP judge since 1995

Online erockrph

  • Official Poobah of No Life.
  • *
  • Posts: 4072
  • Chepachet, RI
    • View Profile
    • The Hop WHisperer
Re: Wyeast 1728 Scottish Ale
« Reply #22 on: June 08, 2014, 07:11:46 PM »
A lot of folks will identify a smokey taste from the slightest bit of scorched malt in the bottom of the mash tun or kettle. 
I just had a homebrew at our club meeting that several people thought had a smoke flavor, but to me it was more burnt.  Turned out the brewer confessed that he had scorched a bit of grain.

I have long suspected that either kettle caramelization, roast barley, or the combination of the two is responsible for this smoky note. I'm not saying that it couldn't be directly from the yeast, but there are just so many other possible process- or ingredient-related sources of this flavor that I feel those are way more likely. A clean-fermenting ale yeast combined with a simple recipe leave nothing to hide behind that might otherwise mask this character.
Eric B.

Finally got around to starting a homebrewing blog: The Hop Whisperer

Offline klickitat jim

  • Official Poobah of No Life.
  • *
  • Posts: 4793
    • View Profile
Re: Wyeast 1728 Scottish Ale
« Reply #23 on: June 09, 2014, 07:32:58 AM »
I'll keep a more open mind to it scince Martin says he experienced it once, but so far I have not.

Offline chumley

  • Brewmaster
  • *****
  • Posts: 531
    • View Profile
Re: Wyeast 1728 Scottish Ale
« Reply #24 on: June 09, 2014, 11:13:52 AM »
Count me as another who has never got any smoky ester from 1728.

Offline denny

  • Administrator
  • Retired with too much time on my hands
  • *****
  • Posts: 13668
  • Noti OR [1991.4, 287.6deg] AR
    • View Profile
    • Dennybrew
Re: Wyeast 1728 Scottish Ale
« Reply #25 on: June 09, 2014, 01:00:33 PM »
Count me as another who has never got any smoky ester from 1728.

I'm more than willing to admit that possibly the reason I found it a couple times is due to the power of suggestion.
Life begins at 60.....1.060, that is!

www.dennybrew.com

The best, sharpest, funniest, weirdest and most knowledgable minds in home brewing contribute on the AHA forum. - Alewyfe

Offline Kinetic

  • Brewer
  • ****
  • Posts: 270
    • View Profile
Re: Wyeast 1728 Scottish Ale
« Reply #26 on: June 09, 2014, 03:09:51 PM »
I'm going out on a limb and predicting no one here has fermented 1728 in the low 70s.  Dag gum brewers with their fancy temperature control!  (kicks dirt)  I'll do it anyway.

I have a spare fridge that I use for cold crashes and to hold bottled beer.  A temperature controller seems so tempting, but it would only be marginally useful for 2-3 months a year.  I typically select yeast according to ambient basement temperature.  Summer is mostly saison time.  Occasionally I want something else.  It has to be unusually hot for most of the summer for my basement to get above 68.

Offline alestateyall

  • Brewmaster
  • *****
  • Posts: 527
    • View Profile
Re: Wyeast 1728 Scottish Ale
« Reply #27 on: June 09, 2014, 04:08:03 PM »

I'm going out on a limb and predicting no one here has fermented 1728 in the low 70s.  Dag gum brewers with their fancy temperature control!  (kicks dirt)  I'll do it anyway.

I have a spare fridge that I use for cold crashes and to hold bottled beer.  A temperature controller seems so tempting, but it would only be marginally useful for 2-3 months a year.  I typically select yeast according to ambient basement temperature.  Summer is mostly saison time.  Occasionally I want something else.  It has to be unusually hot for most of the summer for my basement to get above 68.

You may be able to drop the temp of your fermenter a few degrees by:

1) place the fermenter in an inch or two of water
2) place a t-shirt "on" fermenter with bottom of shirt in water (carboys can wear shirts)
3) blow a fan on the fermenter and shirt

The evaporation of the water will cool the fermenter. There is no "control" in this set up, but, in a dry ambient you get some cooling effect.
Tommy M.
Starkville, MS

Offline ynotbrusum

  • Senior Brewmaster
  • ******
  • Posts: 1672
  • Da mihi sis cerevisiam.
    • View Profile
Re: Wyeast 1728 Scottish Ale
« Reply #28 on: June 09, 2014, 06:59:57 PM »
I made Jamil's recipe with the "carmelization" approach this past spring and I think I noted the slightest hint of a smoky phenol, but then figured it was an after-taste from the toffee notes in some weird way.  I fermented pretty low, so maybe that had something to do with it - or perhaps a slight overpitch...just searching out loud as to what might have caused it or caused me to perceive it, if it wasn't there.
Hodge Garage Brewing: "Brew with a glad heart!"

Offline klickitat jim

  • Official Poobah of No Life.
  • *
  • Posts: 4793
    • View Profile
Re: Wyeast 1728 Scottish Ale
« Reply #29 on: June 09, 2014, 07:30:26 PM »
Maybe it was there.