Author Topic: Mash temps?  (Read 1291 times)

Offline Will's Swill

  • Brewer
  • ****
  • Posts: 359
  • Secretly likes wine...
    • View Profile
Re: Mash temps?
« Reply #15 on: June 05, 2011, 08:54:38 AM »
Don't the really high efficiency breweries use immersion mills?
Is that a counter-pressure bottle filler in your pocket, or are you just happy to see me?

Offline denny

  • Administrator
  • I must live here
  • *****
  • Posts: 11696
  • Noti OR [1991.4, 287.6deg] AR
    • View Profile
    • Dennybrew
Re: Mash temps?
« Reply #16 on: June 05, 2011, 08:54:53 AM »
I would like to hear the results of this compared to a "dry" crush. If they are squished and not broken open the enzymes might not be as effective as they could be. You might be giving up a lot of comversion. This goes way beyond the malt conditioning by slightly moisting the grain per the Kaiser.

My results were that it made no difference in either efficiency or "lauterability".  Gave it 2 tries and went back to dry crush.  My conclusion was that I had no problems that this method would solve.
Life begins at 60.....1.060, that is!

www.dennybrew.com

The best, sharpest, funniest, weirdest and most knowledgable minds in home brewing contribute on the AHA forum. - Alewyfe

Offline tubercle

  • Senior Brewmaster
  • ******
  • Posts: 1639
  • Sweet Caroline
    • View Profile
Re: Mash temps?
« Reply #17 on: June 05, 2011, 08:57:41 AM »
I would like to hear the results of this compared to a "dry" crush. If they are squished and not broken open the enzymes might not be as effective as they could be. You might be giving up a lot of comversion. This goes way beyond the malt conditioning by slightly moisting the grain per the Kaiser.

My results were that it made no difference in either efficiency or "lauterability".  Gave it 2 tries and went back to dry crush.  My conclusion was that I had no problems that this method would solve.

 Thanks.

You just saved me several experiments :D
Sweet Caroline where the Sun rises over the deep blue sea and sets somewhere beyond Tennessee

Offline denny

  • Administrator
  • I must live here
  • *****
  • Posts: 11696
  • Noti OR [1991.4, 287.6deg] AR
    • View Profile
    • Dennybrew
Re: Mash temps?
« Reply #18 on: June 05, 2011, 09:08:36 AM »
I would like to hear the results of this compared to a "dry" crush. If they are squished and not broken open the enzymes might not be as effective as they could be. You might be giving up a lot of comversion. This goes way beyond the malt conditioning by slightly moisting the grain per the Kaiser.

My results were that it made no difference in either efficiency or "lauterability".  Gave it 2 tries and went back to dry crush.  My conclusion was that I had no problems that this method would solve.

 Thanks.

You just saved me several experiments :D

IF you're having efficiency or lautering problems, it's probably worth a try to see if it will help.  If you;re not, I don't see the value of it.
Life begins at 60.....1.060, that is!

www.dennybrew.com

The best, sharpest, funniest, weirdest and most knowledgable minds in home brewing contribute on the AHA forum. - Alewyfe

Offline tubercle

  • Senior Brewmaster
  • ******
  • Posts: 1639
  • Sweet Caroline
    • View Profile
Re: Mash temps?
« Reply #19 on: June 05, 2011, 10:20:12 AM »
I would like to hear the results of this compared to a "dry" crush. If they are squished and not broken open the enzymes might not be as effective as they could be. You might be giving up a lot of comversion. This goes way beyond the malt conditioning by slightly moisting the grain per the Kaiser.

My results were that it made no difference in either efficiency or "lauterability".  Gave it 2 tries and went back to dry crush.  My conclusion was that I had no problems that this method would solve.

 Thanks.

You just saved me several experiments :D

IF you're having efficiency or lautering problems, it's probably worth a try to see if it will help.  If you;re not, I don't see the value of it.

 I have neither efficency or lautering problem but I have never been one to leave well enough alone :P
Sweet Caroline where the Sun rises over the deep blue sea and sets somewhere beyond Tennessee

Offline a10t2

  • Official Poobah of No Life.
  • *
  • Posts: 3171
  • Ask me why I don't like Chico!
    • View Profile
    • SeanTerrill.com
Re: Mash temps?
« Reply #20 on: June 05, 2011, 10:27:07 AM »
My results were that it made no difference in either efficiency or "lauterability".  Gave it 2 tries and went back to dry crush.  My conclusion was that I had no problems that this method would solve.

I tried it about half a dozen times and found that it did improve "lauterability", in that by doing the malt conditioning I was able to run my pump wide open without compacting the grain bed to the point that it stopped flowing. After timing a couple brew days, though, I figured out that the time savings during the lauter were more than offset by the time it took to do the malt conditioning.
Beer is like porn. You can buy it, but it's more fun to make your own.
http://seanterrill.com/category/brewing/

Offline euge

  • Official Poobah of No Life.
  • *
  • Posts: 7240
  • Estilo Casero
    • View Profile
Re: Mash temps?
« Reply #21 on: June 05, 2011, 10:52:33 AM »
Found conditioning improved the lauter slightly but not the efficiency. Even though I mashed for longer I lost 5 points and the wort looked real starchy. I recirculated this until it improved. The beer tasted great.

With conditioning I got the nice big husks though many of them were "squished" with the endosperm crushed to a fine flour inside. My dry grist results in nearly intact husks and nice fine granular flour. I'm happy with what it provides so see no need to condition in my brewery.
The first principle is that you must not fool yourself, and you are the easiest person to fool. -Richard P. Feynman

ccarlson

  • Guest
Re: Mash temps?
« Reply #22 on: June 05, 2011, 10:55:53 AM »
I've never tried conditioning, but it doesn't sound like a needed step. Besides, I don't really want excessive moisture around my bare, steel rollers.
« Last Edit: June 05, 2011, 04:15:13 PM by ccarlson »

Offline bonjour

  • Administrator
  • Senior Brewmaster
  • *****
  • Posts: 1771
  • Troy, MI, 37mi, 60.9deg AR
    • View Profile
Re: Mash temps?
« Reply #23 on: June 05, 2011, 11:11:49 AM »
If you don't want moisture, put your grain in the oven for several hours before crushing.




Ridiculous. Absolutely.  All grain has moisture to begin with.  The question is how much do you want and how do you want to do it.

Is mash conditioning valid, absolutely.  Do you NEED it or WANT it.  That is one of many choices we all make in how each of us chooses to brew.
Fred Bonjour
Co-Chair Mashing in Michigan 2014 AHA Conference in Grand Rapids, Michigan
AHA Governing Committee; AHA Conference, Club Support & Web Subcommittees



Everything under 1.100 is a 'session' beer ;)

Offline 52mgtd

  • 1st Kit
  • *
  • Posts: 6
    • View Profile
Re: Mash temps?
« Reply #24 on: June 05, 2011, 01:37:20 PM »
I mash in a 15 kettle wrapped with 3 layers of insulation.  During the summer the mash temp may droo 1-2 degrees so I never stir nor take off the lid.  Beer tastes reaaly good.Rich

ccarlson

  • Guest
Re: Mash temps?
« Reply #25 on: June 05, 2011, 03:28:23 PM »
You can add all of the extra steps you want to in brewing your beer, but I like to keep it simple.
« Last Edit: June 06, 2011, 04:27:11 AM by ccarlson »