Author Topic: specialty malts  (Read 1412 times)

Offline andylovesburritos

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specialty malts
« on: June 20, 2011, 08:39:04 AM »
I'm going to make my own pale ale recipe and would like some good ideas for specialty malts. i read in a book what they are, but it didn't go in depth as to which to use for what style or why to use them. does it matter? at this point i want to start with something standard and experiment from there, but i would like some sort of building block and any recommendations to go on from that point. i guess i should also point out that i'm a hop head and i will be dry hopping with amarillo... well amarillo hops all around, but i'm looking for a big hop ale more than a malty ale. are specialty grains necessary for a strong hopped beer? if my math is correct it should be about 60 IBU's.

Offline denny

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Re: specialty malts
« Reply #1 on: June 20, 2011, 08:43:37 AM »
I always use crystal in an APA and Victory is nice sometimes, too.
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Offline hamiltont

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Re: specialty malts
« Reply #2 on: June 20, 2011, 08:49:03 AM »
Crystal 40 & Vienna as Denny mentioned. Munich works too. Maybe 1/2 lb each, or less, per 5 gallons.  Cheers!!!
If Homebrew & BBQ aren't the answer, then you're askin' the wrong questions... Cheers!!!

Offline sailortodd

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Re: specialty malts
« Reply #3 on: June 21, 2011, 08:02:01 AM »
Crystal 40 & Vienna as Denny mentioned. Munich works too. Maybe 1/2 lb each, or less, per 5 gallons.  Cheers!!!

Just to clarify, you're talking about Caravienne or Caramunich, right? Vienna and Munich malts require mashing, and I'm not sure those were the specialty grains the OP was referring to (I could also be wrong). I think he was referring to more specialty steeping grains.

I've read varying accounts of whether Victory requires a mash or not, and came to the ultimate conclusion that you'd get flavor and color from it, but no fermentables. I'm going to try it out in an upcoming IPA recipe.

As far as other specialty grains, would he benefit from Carapils/Dextrin malts? My understanding is they provide good body and head retention (I'm still new to specialty grains as well, so I speak mostly from book knowledge).
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Offline andylovesburritos

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Re: specialty malts
« Reply #4 on: June 21, 2011, 08:06:59 AM »
yes, i use dry extract for base and i'm looking for specialty grains for steeping. i was thinking of using carapils.

Offline denny

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Re: specialty malts
« Reply #5 on: June 21, 2011, 08:14:57 AM »
yes, i use dry extract for base and i'm looking for specialty grains for steeping. i was thinking of using carapils.

I'd recommend crystal rather than carapils.  You'll get more flavor out of it.
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Offline Malticulous

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Re: specialty malts
« Reply #6 on: June 21, 2011, 11:15:47 AM »
Malts like victory/biscuit, melanoidin, and honey malt do have starches so they should be mashed but steeping them will extract some flavor. Even steeping munich or vienna with give some flavor. I've seen many recipes that steep oats (not too sure how well it worked but I did do it once.)

My APAs almost always use 5-7% Crystal 60L and 10% of raw wheat that I toast in the oven. The crystal adds sweetness  for balance. The toasted wheat is somewhat like victory but I like it more.
« Last Edit: June 21, 2011, 11:24:14 AM by Malticulous »

Offline blockade

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Re: specialty malts
« Reply #7 on: June 22, 2011, 08:36:00 PM »
I'm not trying to jack this post, I'm actually very interested considering my club has an American Pale Ale coming up in August and I'd like to submit a solid brew. I plan on using a DME base with a steeped specialty grain.

My question is what is the % ya'll are talking about in some of your posts? Is it the % per of the total weight of what you're putting into the pot?

Offline hokerer

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Re: specialty malts
« Reply #8 on: June 23, 2011, 07:22:21 AM »
I'm not trying to jack this post, I'm actually very interested considering my club has an American Pale Ale coming up in August and I'd like to submit a solid brew. I plan on using a DME base with a steeped specialty grain.

My question is what is the % ya'll are talking about in some of your posts? Is it the % per of the total weight of what you're putting into the pot?

Yes, percentage of total weight of fermentables.  For example (not realistic) if you used nine pounds of extract and one pound of crystal, the crystal would be at 10%.
Joe