Author Topic: Safbrew T58 will turn good for a witbier?  (Read 5782 times)

Offline hamiltont

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Re: Safbrew T58 will turn good for a witbier?
« Reply #15 on: July 15, 2011, 12:18:26 PM »
Although it's been a while, I've made several batches of wit with T-58 and I don't ever recall it under attenuating.

Ditto...  That surprises me too?  If anything it over attenuates for me at times.  YMMV... Cheers!!!
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Offline nateo

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Re: Safbrew T58 will turn good for a witbier?
« Reply #16 on: July 16, 2011, 08:52:23 AM »
Yeah, it finishes low for me as well. Not sure what the deal is with the high FG on that.
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Offline gimmeales

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Re: Safbrew T58 will turn good for a witbier?
« Reply #17 on: July 18, 2011, 08:41:12 AM »
Interesting. Well, I'll definitely use it again, so will see where it lands.  Not a lot about this yeast on the internet, but I distinctly remember a thread (on homebrewtalk iirc), where a couple users mentioned the low-attenuation, which ended up as my experience as well.  I hydrated in ~80f water as I do with all Fermentis products, and it was very quick to start, but petered out quickly too.  Even rousing the yeast after a week or so didn't budge the FG.

I suppose I could have measured mash temps wrong and mashed at 158 instead of 148, but don't think that's the case.

Only way to know will be to brew a couple more Belgian-styles in the near future, darn.

Offline denny

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Re: Safbrew T58 will turn good for a witbier?
« Reply #18 on: July 18, 2011, 08:43:02 AM »
Although I doubt it has anything to do with the difference, I never rehydrate it.
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Offline skyler

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Re: Safbrew T58 will turn good for a witbier?
« Reply #19 on: July 18, 2011, 12:16:42 PM »
IMO, since witbier is interpreted so differently by so many pro brewers (Bruery White Orchard, Blue Moon, Hoegaarden, Blanche de Bruxelles, Ommegang Hennepin, Unibroue Blanche de Chambly, and St. Bernardus Wit are all completely different beers), that, at this point, almost any Belgian-style yeast will work for a Witbier, depending on what you are shooting for. For me, I long sought a bone dry witbier with a slight tartness, and so I found my favorite strain for that was Wyeast 3711 French Saison. Lately, I have sought a bit more sweetness and spice and less tartness, so I am back to using the classic Witbier and Forbidden fruit strains (and mashing at 150-152, rather than 148-150). But it really depends on what kind of witbier you want. If the goal is a Hoegaarden Clone, then sticking with the classic wit strain at WLP or Wyeast is preferable. From the sounds of it, you are not concerned with cloning Hoegaarden, and are just looking for a nice Wit with some esters, phenols, and the wonderful viscosity that only raw wheat can provide - I am sure any Belgian-style strain will do fine by you and your palate, if that's the case. That being said, T-58 is one strain I have zero experience with - I have not even tasted a beer made with T-58.

Offline nateo

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Re: Safbrew T58 will turn good for a witbier?
« Reply #20 on: July 18, 2011, 05:00:25 PM »
Skyler - That's a good point about the tons of different interpretations of wits. From Brewing with Wheat, wits were traditionally very tart/sour with very low attenuation, like 40-50%. Then Pierre Celis came along and made something completely different and marketed it as a 'wit.'
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