Author Topic: Wit Recipe  (Read 4498 times)

Offline MDixon

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Re: Wit Recipe
« Reply #15 on: July 06, 2011, 02:45:24 PM »
I think it's all of the above and then how finely it is ground/crushed. Most experiments are done using flour. I think that old MoreBeer thread has some info I posted, lemme see...
http://forums.morebeer.com/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=22378&start=5&st=0&sk=t&sd=a

Not the exact temp research I did, but demonstrates the range is higher than a standard mash temp. I use the boiled wheat to help mash in the rest of the grist.
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Offline gmac

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Re: Wit Recipe
« Reply #16 on: July 06, 2011, 03:13:58 PM »
Feed wheat?  Let us know how it turns out.  It's guaranteed to be cheaper than from the store, but I don't know about the quality.  Do you know what kind of wheat it is?  WF was just an example, there is very likely to be a store near you that carries it.

We've been able to get a wide selection of Unibroue beers for a pretty long time.  We miss some of the specialties, but I've gotten Apple Ephemere, Currant Ephemere, and of course when it comes out I always get Quelque Chose.  But La Fin Du Monde is a no-brainer, great beer.

Tom,
Not sure what the wheat is, I'll check it out when I get it tonight.  Price was free so I think I can afford that.  I'm sure the quality will be ok but I'll be taking a very close look at it before I brew with it (particularly for any sign of diseased kernels).  Glad to hear that you've had some of our better brews.  La Fin Du Monde is fantastic.

MDixon
Can you explain the mashing process in further detail?  I am going to assume you need to mill the grain first then boil it and then mash it in with the barley at the temperatures you stated.  Still unsure about how I'd do that in a cooler.  Any comment on water?  I assume very low in hardness/carbonates would be best.  I'll be using 2/3 distilled, 1/3 tap because I have fairly hard tap water. 

Offline tschmidlin

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Re: Wit Recipe
« Reply #17 on: July 06, 2011, 03:19:20 PM »
I think it's all of the above and then how finely it is ground/crushed. Most experiments are done using flour. I think that old MoreBeer thread has some info I posted, lemme see...
http://forums.morebeer.com/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=22378&start=5&st=0&sk=t&sd=a

Not the exact temp research I did, but demonstrates the range is higher than a standard mash temp. I use the boiled wheat to help mash in the rest of the grist.
Good info, thanks Mike.  I'll try boiling with my next raw wheat beer.
Tom Schmidlin

Offline MDixon

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Re: Wit Recipe
« Reply #18 on: July 07, 2011, 05:15:28 AM »
Take the cracked/crushed/whatever raw wheat and boil with water (doesn't really matter how much so long as it is soupy) for 15 min or so. You can do this easily on the stove, and could even do it ahead of time. I then add that to the mash or start the strike with the water since it is hot. My first temp is pretty cool at 104F so it may take some adjustment to get the mash temp right for the first rest. If you've not mashed that cool before, be sure and taste as the mash progresses. It's pretty nasty (kinda acidic) at the cold temps and is interesting how things change over time.

(Keep in mind I kettle mash so I ramp up the temp instead of infusing the mash with hot water for the next rest.)
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Offline jeffy

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Re: Wit Recipe
« Reply #19 on: July 07, 2011, 06:14:57 AM »
I've always heard that accompanying the wheat with some malt and resting it at sacc temp first keeps the whole thing from becoming a sticky mess on the stove.
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Offline MDixon

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Re: Wit Recipe
« Reply #20 on: July 07, 2011, 06:34:31 PM »
I've never done a cereal mash (wheat + malt) and have not found it to be a problem.
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Offline gmac

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Re: Wit Recipe
« Reply #21 on: July 07, 2011, 07:52:37 PM »
I got my feed wheat.  It looks good.  Now, if Canada Post would get my damn yeast here I'd be brewing...
Oh, I also bought "Brewing with Wheat" yesterday and I'm half way through it.  Not sure why that matters since I'll be following Mdixon's recipe (although it kills me a little inside to follow a recipe) but I'm really liking the idea of using wheat.

Online hopfenundmalz

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Re: Wit Recipe
« Reply #22 on: July 08, 2011, 05:39:25 AM »
Using raw wheat for Wits and p-Lambics, I have always just done an infusion mash, and hit my OG.  Pragmatic and easy (channeling Denny a little).

Boiling or a cereal mash would burst the small starch granuales, just like a decoction does for malted barley.  Randy Mosher says that it gives a superior mouthfeel (Radical Brewing?).  SInce I have been doing decoctions for Pilsners, and cereal mashes for CAPs, I might do a cereal mash if I ever do a Wit again.

If one looks through "Brewing With Wheat", one will find step mashes used by the commercial brewers that use raw wheat.  That might be due to equipment limitations, as many would not have invested in a cereal cooker.


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Offline gmac

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Re: Wit Recipe
« Reply #23 on: July 12, 2011, 12:04:21 PM »
Finally, yeast is here.  I assume you need a decent starter with this?  I'm going to make a starter regardless because I don't know how long this yeast sat in the post office (things are still very slow thanks to a recent strike).  It was pretty warm when it got here so I think I'll do a 1.5L starter just to make sure it's alive and healthy before I start fermenting.  

I may have missed it but what is the recommended fermentation temps for this style.  My air conditioner crapped out too today (not going to buy any lottery tickets this week) so it could get a bit warm in the basement (70-75F).  It's usually 65-68 down there all year when the AC is running.

Sorry, forgot to mention the yeast in question is WLP400 Belgian Wit Ale Yeast.
« Last Edit: July 12, 2011, 01:01:57 PM by gmac »

Offline linenoiz

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Re: Wit Recipe
« Reply #24 on: July 12, 2011, 02:15:06 PM »
I just brewed this recipe using that yeast. I fermented at a temp-controlled 73 and it came out great.

Offline MDixon

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Re: Wit Recipe
« Reply #25 on: July 12, 2011, 06:05:21 PM »
I prefer 3944 at 68F. 400 was a bit tamer in my various incantations, YMMV
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Offline gmac

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Re: Wit Recipe
« Reply #26 on: July 19, 2011, 05:44:16 PM »
How sour should this yeast be?  What I mean is that I have made a starter and during the "occasional shaking" process, some ran out and I tasted it and it is pretty sour.  I do have a lot of fruit flies this time of year but it's been tightly closed with tin foil.  Not saying it's gone bad but is the sourness normal?  It's a lot more sour than I would expect having drank commercial wits.

Also, I did find Indian coriander (at least it says it was grown in India).  Gonna try to brew this on Thursday unless you say the yeast is contaminated (no evidence of anything floating).  Not sure where that was suggested but I remember reading it somewhere.

Offline MDixon

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Re: Wit Recipe
« Reply #27 on: July 20, 2011, 04:16:19 AM »
I don't know that I have ever tasted a witbier yeast starter so I'm no help with that one...
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Offline gmac

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Re: Wit Recipe
« Reply #28 on: July 21, 2011, 08:40:35 AM »
When would you measure the pH using Mdixon's schedule?  I used 5L of tap water to boil the grain and 15 L of distilled water and the pH is 6.4 after the 10 min rest at 104.  I'm going to adjust them at the saccarification rest (153) but do I need to worry prior to that?

Offline denny

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Re: Wit Recipe
« Reply #29 on: July 21, 2011, 09:49:01 AM »
When would you measure the pH using Mdixon's schedule?  I used 5L of tap water to boil the grain and 15 L of distilled water and the pH is 6.4 after the 10 min rest at 104.  I'm going to adjust them at the saccarification rest (153) but do I need to worry prior to that?

Nope.  The sacc rest is where it really counts.
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