Author Topic: Mushroom problems  (Read 1373 times)

Offline bluefoxicy

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Mushroom problems
« on: July 29, 2011, 07:14:00 AM »
So I bought a pack of portabella mushrooms... I eat these with breakfast most of the time.  Those and shiitake.  I fried up both in the Wok today.

At least I think it was portabella and shiitake.

One of the portabellas had a skirt around the mushroom cap, hanging from the edge.  I went, "Huh?  Probably a look-alike..." and ... proceeded to eat it.  I mean I got it from Safeway, it was packaged in a pack of Portabella mushrooms, and I'm not a mycologist and someone who could actually identify mushrooms put it there.  You know how that goes... bypass the brain and figure someone else did it and they probably know what they're doing.

You know, Tang is really good.

I put so much Tang in my Tang that it burns when I drink it.

... why is my Tang bland today?

Oranges taste like nothing, or maybe soap.  In fact, my sense of taste went 90% numb for about 2 hours.  I'm fine now.

Why did I do that?  Why would anyone do that?  It's a mushroom.  It doesn't look like the last one.  This isn't the mushroom you're looking for.

Everything tastes so good right now.

Offline 1vertical

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Re: Mushroom problems
« Reply #1 on: July 29, 2011, 07:48:45 AM »
 Dang BFE I really hope you did not get the wrong kind because
that genus’ identification is easily mistaken.  I believe that the source
of your mushroom is safe and reliable.  The portabella DOES have
a ring on the stipe.

Agacarius Bisporus (quote from Wiki)
Description:
Agaricus bisporus,  
The pileus or cap of the original wild species is a pale grey-brown in color, with broad, flat scales on a paler background and fading toward the margins. It is first hemispherical in shape before flattening out with maturity, and 5–10 cm (2–4 in) in diameter. The narrow, crowded gills are free and initially pink, then red-brown and finally a dark brown with a whitish edge from the cheilocystidia. The cylindrical stipe is up to 6 cm (2⅓ in) tall by 1–2 cm wide and bears a thick and narrow ring, which may be streaked on the upperside. The firm flesh is white though stains a pale pinkish-red on bruising.[9][10] The spore print is dark brown. The spores are oval to round and measure around 4.5–5.5 x 5–7.5 μm, and the basidia usually two-spored, although two tetrasporic varieties have been described from the Mojave desert and the Mediterranean with predominantly heterothallic and homothallic lifestyles, respectively[11][12]

Commonly found in fields and grassy areas after rain from late spring through to autumn worldwide, especially in association with manure. It is widely collected and eaten, even by those who would not normally experiment with mushrooming.[10]

raw Nutritional value per 100 g (3.5 oz)
Energy 94 kJ (22 kcal)
Carbohydrates 3.28 g
- Sugars 1.65 g
- Dietary fiber 1.0 g
Fat 0.34 g
Protein 3.09 g
Water 92.43 g
Thiamine (Vit. B1) 0.081 mg (6%)
Riboflavin (Vit. B2) 0.402 mg (27%)
Niacin (Vit. B3) 3.607 mg (24%)
Pantothenic acid (B5) 1.497 mg (30%)
Vitamin C 2.1 mg (4%)
Iron 0.50 mg (4%)
Percentages are relative to US recommendations for adults.
Source: USDA Nutrient database

Similar speciesSee also: Mushroom hunting
The common mushroom could be confused with young specimens of the deadly poisonous destroying angel (Amanita sp.), but the latter can be distinguished by their volva or cup at the base of the mushroom and pure white gills (as opposed to pinkish or brown of Agaricus bisporus). Thus it is important to always clear away debris and examine the base of a mushroom, as well as cutting open young specimens to check the gills. Furthermore, the destroying angel grows in mossy woods and lives symbiotically with spruce.

A more common and less dangerous mistake is to confuse Agaricus bisporus with Agaricus xanthodermus, an inedible mushroom found worldwide in grassy areas. Agaricus xanthodermus has an odor reminiscent of phenol; its flesh turns yellow when bruised. This fungus causes nausea and vomiting in some people.

The poisonous European species Entoloma sinuatum has a passing resemblance but has yellowish gills turning pink and lacks a ring.





« Last Edit: July 29, 2011, 07:58:38 AM by 1vertical »
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Offline 1vertical

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Re: Mushroom problems
« Reply #2 on: July 29, 2011, 08:25:17 AM »
And FWIW...and an interesting read a story about a person that
Ate a destroying angel and survived....
http://blog.mycology.cornell.edu/?p=68
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Offline bluefoxicy

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Re: Mushroom problems
« Reply #3 on: July 29, 2011, 08:27:57 AM »
Nice, destroying angels.  This is why I don't pick my own mushrooms.

Okay, so a skirt hanging off the cap is normal?

Must just be sick then.  I'm also fatigued (for a different reason) and figured that was from biking too much or something (I went to sleep at 6pm and got up at 6:30am!), but wouldn't attribute a loss of taste to that.

Perhaps there's another underlying issue, or fatigue does funny things.  As the ring is normal, and the poisonous species lack a ring or have obvious differences I haven't noticed (yeah, phenol?  I'd notice if I ingested something that smelled like wet bandaid and antiseptic), or if I found a white portabella (brown gill is the only variety sold here).  So it's not a destroying angel or one of the ones that makes me puke, okay.

I think I just need more sleep, or more food in general.

Thanks for that though.

Offline 1vertical

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Re: Mushroom problems
« Reply #4 on: July 29, 2011, 08:55:28 AM »
Yeah the ring is normal and you state there was a skirt hanging off the edge of the cap.
This too is normal and it is the remnant of the veil which encloses the gills in the juvenile
form as it grows, it tears the veil and part of it is left on the stipe as a ring and the rest
if any is left dangling from the periphy of the cap like a skirt kind of...

The poisonous Aminita "destroying angel" has a veil and a ring and veil remnants just
the same as the portabella.  It does have differences however and these are what make
it unique and distinguish it from the "good" portabella.  One of the differences is that
it has the stem growing up from a sub-terranian or semi buried egg like cup.  The portabella
does NOT have this.  Better yet if you are chasing wild ones and you have ANY DOUBT at
all....just not worth it to take a chance and leave the doubtful ones completely alone....!!!

I put the blog about the survivor on there so you could guage your symptoms against the
known poisoned person's symptoms and decide where you are at in perspective with that
as a guideline.

Edit: That said, food poisoning could be a possible in the commercial packaging venue as
 it has happened before in other foodstuffs.
« Last Edit: July 29, 2011, 08:57:22 AM by 1vertical »
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Offline bluefoxicy

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Re: Mushroom problems
« Reply #5 on: July 29, 2011, 09:21:49 AM »
One of the differences is that it has the stem growing up from a sub-terranian or semi buried egg like cup.  The portabelladoes NOT have this.  Better yet if you are chasing wild ones and you have ANY DOUBT at all....just not worth it to take a chance and leave the doubtful ones completely alone....!!!


Yeah not helpful when eating out of commercial packaged food  ???

But the color of the gills is a dead give-away.

Offline bluefoxicy

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Re: Mushroom problems
« Reply #6 on: July 29, 2011, 09:57:20 AM »
also Destroying Angel sounds like the name of a hot supervillainess ... maybe Poison Ivy's hot teenaged niece?

Offline 1vertical

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Re: Mushroom problems
« Reply #7 on: July 29, 2011, 10:22:16 AM »
Photo licensed under
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/

Photo by  damonbrunette



DO NOT EAT THESE
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Offline bluefoxicy

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Re: Mushroom problems
« Reply #8 on: July 29, 2011, 12:24:42 PM »
Ah, no, I ate these



Except one had something growing out of the cap, hanging down the stem ... although that destroying angel has something growing up from the base of the stem.



These are good too.  I've seen wild ones that look like this but I sure as hell wouldn't try eating one o_o

I've also seen these growing around here:



The kind Mario eats to get bigger.

HEEEEEEEEEELLLLLLLLL no.

Offline 1vertical

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Re: Mushroom problems
« Reply #9 on: July 30, 2011, 01:35:46 PM »
At this juncture, I would venture to say that in all actuality, there prolly was NOT any
mushroom problem....correct???  (this needs to be said for any mycophobes out there)
« Last Edit: July 30, 2011, 01:38:45 PM by 1vertical »
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Online narvin

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Re: Mushroom problems
« Reply #10 on: July 30, 2011, 05:15:03 PM »
If you actually got a destroying angel at Safeway, I will personally come to your bedside and listen to your ridiculous stories while you recover. :D
Please do not reply if your an evil alien!
Thanks
Chris S.

Offline bluefoxicy

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Re: Mushroom problems
« Reply #11 on: August 01, 2011, 12:48:18 PM »
At this juncture, I would venture to say that in all actuality, there prolly was NOT any
mushroom problem....correct???  (this needs to be said for any mycophobes out there)

Yes that seems correct.  There were other (likely fatigue) problems and a strange looking mutant mushroom.

Often mushroom poisoning can cause some strange side effects immediately, and then death in several days after seeming full recovery.  Usually this goes like massive headaches and vomiting for a couple hours, then a full recovery, next day you feel great, three days later you suddenly get extremely sick and 3 hours after that you're dead.

So of course, it's usually good to give thought to strangeness.  Not too much thought--no use panicking over everything--but if you think something is strange, don't just shrug it off.  If someone pulls out the book and goes, "Was it this?" and you're like, "... that's EXACTLY it," it's time to go to the ER.

Well, unless you ate false morels.  Then you can probably shrug it off, and vomit a lot.  Boil them more next time.

It's too bad I can't import morels and puffballs here and scatter the spores around.
« Last Edit: August 01, 2011, 12:53:32 PM by bluefoxicy »

Offline pinnah

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Re: Mushroom problems
« Reply #12 on: August 03, 2011, 07:59:03 PM »
I found some of these today.

They looked scary, and were going to black.


Offline 1vertical

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Re: Mushroom problems
« Reply #13 on: August 03, 2011, 09:25:11 PM »
too far gone inky caps....ewwwww
(nice pic tho) ::)
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