Author Topic: Bottle bombs  (Read 1838 times)

Offline gymrat

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Re: Bottle bombs
« Reply #15 on: August 09, 2011, 08:27:22 AM »
Turbinato sugar does not dissolve very well. That's why I hate it when it is the only sugar offered in coffee shops. Even in hot coffee it has to be stirred a long time to get it to dissolve, and even then, the bottom of the cup is always way too sweet after not tasting very much of it at the beginning. Your bottle bombs are probably from the bottom of your bottling bucket. Most of your beers will probably be flat.
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Offline BrewinSB

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Re: Bottle bombs
« Reply #16 on: August 09, 2011, 08:30:59 PM »
- Maybe the turbinado sugar has an extra protien in it's chain for the yeast to munch on? - that would create more CO2
Protein catabolism is not likely to generate CO2.

It was just one bottle, I lean toward either a bad bottle or incomplete mixing, especially since the bottles that have been opened are under carbonated.

I've always just dumped in my priming mix and then transferred on top of that figuring that would mix it up enough.  I am worried if I try to stir it, then I will start introducing oxygen.

Turbinato sugar does not dissolve very well. That's why I hate it when it is the only sugar offered in coffee shops. Even in hot coffee it has to be stirred a long time to get it to dissolve, and even then, the bottom of the cup is always way too sweet after not tasting very much of it at the beginning. Your bottle bombs are probably from the bottom of your bottling bucket. Most of your beers will probably be flat.

Yeah, I was not too happy about having to use turbinado, but it was all I had around.  I was thinking of using honey, but was lazy in doing the research about how to do that properly.