Author Topic: Using Corks In Bottling Mead  (Read 3778 times)

Offline tschmidlin

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Re: Using Corks In Bottling Mead
« Reply #15 on: August 14, 2011, 08:54:30 PM »
Did you measure the temp of the wax by any chance?  Is that just one coat?

I ask because I've seen some really thin wax coatings on some commercial bottles, and they look lame.  You can tell sometimes they even did it twice.  Yours look perfect.

I don't know if the difference is the wax or maybe the wax temp.
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Offline punatic

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Re: Using Corks In Bottling Mead
« Reply #16 on: August 14, 2011, 09:12:34 PM »
The wax-sealed bottles are a very nice presentation!

What yeast did you use?  Many wine yeasts are fine fermenting at 75 degrees F.  Maybe it's high ethanol content that's giving you the perception of fusels?

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Offline Pawtucket Patriot

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Re: Using Corks In Bottling Mead
« Reply #17 on: August 15, 2011, 05:31:13 AM »
Not sure about the wax temp.  But it wasn't under a constant flame; it sat in a warm water bath while I dipped the bottles.

punatic, I used Lalvin D-47.  OG was 1.104; FG was .999-1.000. I could be tasting ethanol.  Honestly, I've never evaluated a homebrewed product with that level of alcohol, so maybe I'm just tasting normal ethanol amounts.  But it's pretty hot tasting; a few other tasters (who are primarily wine drinkers) make the "whiskey" face when tasting it (as if to say, "wow, that's got a lot of alcohol!").
« Last Edit: August 15, 2011, 06:48:49 AM by Pawtucket Patriot »
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Offline Jimmy K

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Re: Using Corks In Bottling Mead
« Reply #18 on: August 15, 2011, 06:12:08 AM »
Yep, I sanitize the corks in a container of starsan.  What are you using for cork size & corker?  Cheers!!!

I have this corker: http://www.midwestsupplies.com/gilda-compresion-hand-corker.html

I bought #9 straight corks.  I may wax the tops for fun. Looks easy enough.

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Offline ryang

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Re: Using Corks In Bottling Mead
« Reply #19 on: August 15, 2011, 08:19:54 AM »
you can use old crayons next time...

Offline punatic

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Re: Using Corks In Bottling Mead
« Reply #20 on: August 15, 2011, 11:14:54 AM »
Lalvin D47's spec sheet says optimum fermentation temp range is 15 - 20 degrees C  (59 - 68 F).  Mid 70s might have made for some fusel production.  Do you smell any acetone-like notes in your mead?
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Offline Pawtucket Patriot

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Re: Using Corks In Bottling Mead
« Reply #21 on: August 15, 2011, 01:13:22 PM »
Lalvin D47's spec sheet says optimum fermentation temp range is 15 - 20 degrees C  (59 - 68 F).  Mid 70s might have made for some fusel production.  Do you smell any acetone-like notes in your mead?

I don't smell any acetone/solvent-like notes. The nose is actually pretty nice: slight apple and honey notes -- just what I would expect a dry mead to smell like. But I do taste alcohol harshness.  I'm hoping some long-term aging will cause most, if not all, of the harshness to go away.  I guess I just expected this mead to be considerably smoother after a year of bulk aging. But maybe my expectations are unrealistic. I wouldn't expect a great wine to be fully mature within a year!
« Last Edit: August 15, 2011, 01:15:53 PM by Pawtucket Patriot »
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Offline punatic

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Re: Using Corks In Bottling Mead
« Reply #22 on: August 15, 2011, 01:21:56 PM »
Your mead finished pretty dry.  Pop a bottle and try back-sweetening it a bit with some honey.  Maybe that will add some balance.
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Re: Using Corks In Bottling Mead
« Reply #23 on: August 15, 2011, 02:15:47 PM »
Your mead finished pretty dry.  Pop a bottle and try back-sweetening it a bit with some honey.  Maybe that will add some balance.

I'll give backsweetening a shot. That could make the mead more drinkable in the short term.  But at 1.000, I think it finished right where it was supposed to for a dry mead. I just need to be more patient  ;)
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Offline gordonstrong

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Re: Using Corks In Bottling Mead
« Reply #24 on: August 15, 2011, 03:14:59 PM »
You can still have a dry mead without it being bone dry.  You'll be surprised.  Try pouring a glass of it, taking a small spoon of honey, and swirling it in the mead (while the honey is on the spoon).  Give it a couple swirls, taste, repeat.  Gives you an idea of how it can change.  Then do it to taste in the bigger batch.
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