Author Topic: Becoming a professional Brewer  (Read 1317 times)

Offline a10t2

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Re: Becoming a professional Brewer
« Reply #15 on: August 18, 2011, 01:42:41 PM »
Our brewers operate fork lifts more than they weigh ingredients, and clean/sanitize stuff that smells bad more than anything else.

... and most brewers would be extremely jealous of them for having a forklift.
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Offline phillamb168

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Re: Becoming a professional Brewer
« Reply #16 on: November 23, 2011, 05:30:33 AM »
One big thing to keep in mind in terms of equipment, a fact about which I was told the other day, is that equipment costs money, but MOVING and INSTALLING the equipment can sometimes cost even more, and should definitely be a part of the initial budget. For example, we want to move up north after a few years or three, and so it makes no sense to invest in a 5+ BBL brewery right now. We're going to start small with 1BBL and go from there (and yes, I know the argument against it, but things are different over here).
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Offline majorvices

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Re: Becoming a professional Brewer
« Reply #17 on: November 23, 2011, 06:22:06 AM »
Our brewers operate fork lifts more than they weigh ingredients, and clean/sanitize stuff that smells bad more than anything else.

... and most brewers would be extremely jealous of them for having a forklift.

I have a forklift now. It rocks!  ;D

Phill - one thing you can do once you get started on your one bbl system is simply add another MT, BK, Chiller and Pump. That's what I did. You can get very close to 3 bbls by doing this for very little money. We fill 110 gallon fermenters (close to 90 gallons at a time.)
« Last Edit: November 23, 2011, 09:24:19 PM by majorvices »
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Offline boulderbrewer

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Re: Becoming a professional Brewer
« Reply #18 on: November 23, 2011, 09:11:49 PM »
I needed a forklift last week but it is on the wish list. 7 BBL here. I understand where you are going but work smarter rather than stronger. Your back will only last so long.
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Offline phillamb168

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Re: Becoming a professional Brewer
« Reply #19 on: November 24, 2011, 01:46:18 AM »
Our brewers operate fork lifts more than they weigh ingredients, and clean/sanitize stuff that smells bad more than anything else.

... and most brewers would be extremely jealous of them for having a forklift.

I have a forklift now. It rocks!  ;D

Phill - one thing you can do once you get started on your one bbl system is simply add another MT, BK, Chiller and Pump. That's what I did. You can get very close to 3 bbls by doing this for very little money. We fill 110 gallon fermenters (close to 90 gallons at a time.)

That's a great idea - so I guess you mash twice and then boil everything at the same time?
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Offline bbump22

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Re: Becoming a professional Brewer
« Reply #20 on: March 09, 2012, 07:36:37 PM »
I'm not sure how trigonometry will help you with brewing, but it was my favorite math in college.

Find a brewey, ask if you can help them with the grunt work, show up early, stay late, work hard, show an interest in what they're doing, have a positive attitude, and you should be successful.  Make yourself as indispensable as possible. 

Did I mention work hard?

Thats exactly how I started at a small start up in Seattle, then a year later I scored a job at Allagash...You have to be persistent and call them everyday once they have allowed you to volunteer once...They always need your help, but aren't going to call you so you can sand their stools...most brewers are too humble to ask you to do that, so ask them!

Just be persistent and honest and show your passion for beer and be ready to work your ass off.
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Offline nateo

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Re: Becoming a professional Brewer
« Reply #21 on: March 09, 2012, 07:42:00 PM »
and be ready to work your ass off.

From my experience, that's how you make money running a small business. If you personally work the equivalent of 2-3 jobs, that's 1 or 2 people don't have to pay. That's about the extent of my small business wisdom though. I have no idea how businesses that employ a lot of people make any money.

Unfortunately no one wants to volunteer at tackle stores, so I can't get free grunt work.
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