Author Topic: Double pass milling  (Read 2356 times)

Offline tfries

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Re: Double pass milling
« Reply #15 on: January 12, 2010, 08:04:37 PM »
I hook a cordless drill up to it.  That works well as long as you remember to charge the battery beforehand.




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Offline hankus

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Re: Double pass milling
« Reply #16 on: January 19, 2010, 07:44:13 AM »
One of my generous friends gave me an old motor (u can get one off a clothes dryer ) and I set it up on a found kid's desk and got 2 pulleys from Grainger +belt to slow the usual 1700 RPM to 180 which is what most mills use..too fast a grind could burn the grain if a long term run

Offline Beertracker

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Re: Double pass milling
« Reply #17 on: January 19, 2010, 10:51:17 AM »
I got away from using the double-pass method, but I may have to revert back to see if it improves my efficiency. I doubt I'll ever use the "wet" milling method with my current setup, but it's easy to see how that could improve your numbers. Thanks for the post!  ;)   
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Offline bluesman

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Re: Double pass milling
« Reply #18 on: January 19, 2010, 10:52:58 AM »
A good way to check the gap on your mill is to use a feeler gage. They are typically used to check the gaps on spark plugs and can be purchased at automotive stores.

But if you are looking for a rough check using common household items, the following can be used.

crisp dollar bill = .005"
standard credit card = .030"
standard 1" paperclip = .034"
dime = .057"
quarter = .070"
nickel = .078"

The coin thickness are measured at the rims.
« Last Edit: January 20, 2010, 09:05:46 AM by bluesman »
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