Author Topic: Single-malt beers  (Read 974 times)

Offline pehlman

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Single-malt beers
« on: August 21, 2011, 11:32:41 PM »
Ive been wanting to dive into learning the different characteristics that the different kinds of malts add to a beer. Ive heard/read about people brewing a bunch of what they called "single-malt beers", featuring individual specialty grains to learn their flavor really well. This is what I am assuming they mean by "single-malt"...
 
For example. If i want to learn the flavor of Crystal-60: I would still use a base malt like Pale 2-row making up 75-90% of the grain bill, correct? And just fill up the rest with C-60.

I shouldn't just make a 100% C-60 grain-bill, right? ???

Hope that makes sense!!!    ;D
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Offline chezteth

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Re: Single-malt beers
« Reply #1 on: August 22, 2011, 04:29:57 AM »

I shouldn't just make a 100% C-60 grain-bill, right? ???

Hope that makes sense!!!    ;D

Right, a 100% C-60 grain bill will not convert.  Thus, it won't be fermentable.  You need base grain which has the necessary enzymes to convert.  What I have heard for a single malt beer usually involves a single base grain ( ie pale ale malt ).  However, I could see you using a single base grain and a single specialty grain to get an idea of the specialty grain flavor.  I would probably use a relatively low hopping rate so the bitterness doesn't overpower the grain flavors.

Happy Brewing,
Brandon

Offline hopfenundmalz

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Re: Single-malt beers
« Reply #2 on: August 22, 2011, 05:22:47 AM »
You can make beers that are all of one malt to showcase those and/or learn what they bring to the beer.  You can make all Pilsner, or all Maris Otter, or all Golden Promise, or all Vienna, or all Munich beers.  I think I have done all of those over the years.

If you add Crystal, you no longer have a single malt.  If you want to see what it does to a beer, you could make one that is 90% base malt and 10% Crystal C60.  A beer that is 100% base malt would be your control sample.  Make both and compare.  If the 100% base is not too you liking, you can blend the 2 beers.

To see what different Crystal malts are like, you can either chew them, or do a small steep of crushed malt in 155F water at the ratio of 1.5 quarts of water to 1 pound of grain (scale that down so you don't have to use a full pound).
Jeff Rankert
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Offline pehlman

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Re: Single-malt beers
« Reply #3 on: August 22, 2011, 03:35:33 PM »
Thats what I thought. haha. Thanks guys! Got some great input there. Wish I could brew everyday! There are too many options and possibilities!

I feel like if I spend some time better understanding the character of each individual ingredient, then in the long run, it would help me with developing my own recipes and being able to create whatever I have in mind.
Beer: It's what's for dinner.

-Mike Pehl (Certified Cicerone TM)

Fermenting: Chocolate Rye Ale Please (C.R.A.P.)
                 Kern River "Citra" DIPA Clone
Drinking: All the lovely fall seasonal beers! My Favorites!

Offline a10t2

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Re: Single-malt beers
« Reply #4 on: August 22, 2011, 05:53:48 PM »
Wish I could brew everyday! There are too many options and possibilities!

I remember that feeling. :-\

Anyway, chewing some of a specialty malt can generally give you a pretty good idea of what it will bring to the beer. I've also heard of brewers making "malt teas" and blending them to try out different grists.
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