Author Topic: Fermentaion Temp Differences on same beer recipe?  (Read 757 times)

Offline pricepeeler

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Fermentaion Temp Differences on same beer recipe?
« on: August 22, 2011, 02:06:10 PM »
Question for anyone:
I have read a little bit about this, but would love to hear some personal experiences. Hyperlinks if you've got'em.

-Comment on the effects of same beer recipe and yeast strain fermented at different temperatures.

Price

Offline denny

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Re: Fermentaion Temp Differences on same beer recipe?
« Reply #1 on: August 22, 2011, 03:26:56 PM »
Question for anyone:
I have read a little bit about this, but would love to hear some personal experiences. Hyperlinks if you've got'em.

-Comment on the effects of same beer recipe and yeast strain fermented at different temperatures.

Price

Easy...my experience is that lower temps produce cleaner (less estery) beers and higher temps produce more estery beers.  Very high temps can also produce fusels and other undesirable flavors.
Life begins at 60.....1.060, that is!

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The best, sharpest, funniest, weirdest and most knowledgable minds in home brewing contribute on the AHA forum. - Alewyfe

Offline saintpierre

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Re: Fermentaion Temp Differences on same beer recipe?
« Reply #2 on: August 22, 2011, 03:30:20 PM »

Easy...my experience is that lower temps produce cleaner (less estery) beers and higher temps produce more estery beers.  Very high temps can also produce fusels and other undesirable flavors.

+1 This has been my experience as well.
Mike St. Pierre
Maine Ale & Libation Tasters (MALT)
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[719.4, 74.1] AR

Offline majorvices

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Re: Fermentaion Temp Differences on same beer recipe?
« Reply #3 on: August 22, 2011, 03:39:26 PM »
Some strains produce undesirable fusels and other off flavors even in the low 70's.
Keith Y.
Self appointed "All Grain" section pruner

Offline Al Equihua

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Re: Fermentaion Temp Differences on same beer recipe?
« Reply #4 on: August 23, 2011, 09:55:13 AM »
Good thing that we are just beginning in this of making beer, is the first time you produce a liquid with smell and taste of beer are you so happy and proud I just want to drink it. in my batch no. 10 I can still say that they have some esters but does not regulate the temperature in any form. I just let the carboy covered with a blanket out of the light in an area and the temperature varies only about 2 degrees Fahrenheit.

 I will consider from now on the idea of ​​improving the taste and have the least amount of esters and yeast in my next beer

 we are gradually intensifying our taste and improving the quality

Al
Al Equihua

Offline denny

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Re: Fermentaion Temp Differences on same beer recipe?
« Reply #5 on: August 23, 2011, 10:01:13 AM »
we are gradually intensifying our taste and improving the quality

Al

That's what it's all about, Al!
Life begins at 60.....1.060, that is!

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The best, sharpest, funniest, weirdest and most knowledgable minds in home brewing contribute on the AHA forum. - Alewyfe

Offline ynotbrusum

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Re: Fermentaion Temp Differences on same beer recipe?
« Reply #6 on: August 23, 2011, 11:20:37 AM »
Al, check into using a swamp cooler - here in Illinois with summer temps in the 80's and 90's, I can keep an ale fermenting in the upper 60's up to 72 max in my basement, by swapping out frozen water bottles in a swamp cooler.  It takes some diligence, but it works.  And Denny is right, the beer is better if the temperature is regulated to be cooler.  I have done ales as low as 52F for faux pilsners. ;)
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Offline pricepeeler

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Re: Fermentaion Temp Differences on same beer recipe?
« Reply #7 on: August 23, 2011, 03:35:39 PM »
Must be nice ynotbrusum.

We got some clouds today, nice break in the heat.

Offline Al Equihua

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Re: Fermentaion Temp Differences on same beer recipe?
« Reply #8 on: August 23, 2011, 05:28:49 PM »
Denny, being a homebrewe makes the diference.. yeah! theres a lot of more to learn

good advice and tip ynotbrusum, ill be triying the ice bottle metod to controled the temp in a submerge carboy or bucket.. like that idea!!.. saludos amigos!
Al Equihua

Offline thcipriani

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Re: Fermentaion Temp Differences on same beer recipe?
« Reply #9 on: August 23, 2011, 07:12:14 PM »
FWIW the cleaner ale strains (think WLP001) tend to show less fermentation differences at higher temperatures than estery or phenolic strains like 002 or 530 in my experience.

I tasted a split batch of cream ale made with 001 at 65F and 001 at 75F. You can definitely taste a difference side-by-side (the one fermented at 75F had more acetaldehyde/esters) but the differences between the two beers weren't really prominent. If I'd have tasted the beers a week apart, I probably wouldn't have noticed.   
Tyler Cipriani
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Offline skyler

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Re: Fermentaion Temp Differences on same beer recipe?
« Reply #10 on: August 27, 2011, 11:08:05 AM »
For me, the sweet spot for most non-Belgian strains is 2 degrees lower than the lowest of the "recommended range." I particularly like WLP002 when fermented around 62-64 - English strains in general are much more pleasant, IMO, a few degrees cooler than "recommended" by the yeast manufacturer. Then I just raise it once high krausen has fallen.