Author Topic: brewing an English pale  (Read 1614 times)

Offline gmac

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Re: brewing an English pale
« Reply #15 on: September 02, 2011, 04:54:20 PM »
Actually, I think an English IPA should be under 5.5% ABV, no matter what the American-written BJCP guidelines say.
+1

Offline tschmidlin

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Re: brewing an English pale
« Reply #16 on: September 02, 2011, 10:28:55 PM »
I guess I should have read these ideas before mashing in. Too late.  ;D

I went with 10.75 lbs MO, 1.5 lbs of vienna, and .5 lbs C40.

I'm going to use US-05 in one carboy and S-04 in the other.  I'm pretty sure I'll like the S-04 better, but I want to try the US-05 in this style.  Plus I wanted to brew without going to the store for anything and I have both of those on hand.

Thanks for the ideas.

Pretty much what I'd have suggested except the carapils. Looks nice. Are you splitting 5 gallons?
No, I brewed 10 gallons. :)
Tom Schmidlin

Offline vista

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Re: brewing an English pale
« Reply #17 on: September 03, 2011, 05:47:02 AM »
with all those specialty grains...and the fact you want to serve something quickly...why not make a mild?
Take it easy...

Offline euge

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Re: brewing an English pale
« Reply #18 on: September 03, 2011, 10:28:34 AM »
with all those specialty grains...and the fact you want to serve something quickly...why not make a mild?

He's almost made one gravity-wise but wanted an ordinary bitter/pale.
The first principle is that you must not fool yourself, and you are the easiest person to fool. -Richard P. Feynman

Offline tschmidlin

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Re: brewing an English pale
« Reply #19 on: September 04, 2011, 12:20:18 AM »
It essentially is a mild in gravity like euge said, but every time I serve a pale mild to people they freak out because "milds are dark".  So when I make a pale mild I just call it a bitter.  Plus I wanted to emphasize the hops.
Tom Schmidlin