Author Topic: Missing Mash Temps  (Read 2210 times)

Offline mtnrockhopper

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Re: Missing Mash Temps
« Reply #15 on: September 14, 2011, 05:44:29 AM »
I am talking single step mash but I also sparge at 165.  If I am sparing at a higher temp does it matter with the mash temp?

The sparge temp will generally inactivate any enzymes left in the mash too, so you'll get no more conversion.
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Offline dano14041

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Re: Missing Mash Temps
« Reply #16 on: September 14, 2011, 06:42:36 AM »
Tubercle does what dmtaylor said...sort of.

 Infuse, check temp. Between 148 and 154? always.

 1 beer and cigar later start to drain.

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I will have to try Tubercle's method some brew day.  :D Sounds like a pretty good brew day!
 
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Offline richardt

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Re: Missing Mash Temps
« Reply #17 on: September 14, 2011, 09:24:43 AM »
I am talking single step mash but I also sparge at 165.  If I am sparing at a higher temp does it matter with the mash temp?

The sparge temp will generally inactivate any enzymes left in the mash too, so you'll get no more conversion.

If you mash-out around 170 F (hold for 15-20 minutes) you should inactivate any enzymes left in the mash (thereby halting any further conversion of your sugars, aka fixing [or setting] the fermentability).  As long as the pH remains below 6.0, you should be OK if the mash-out temp goes above 170 F.

However, if you conduct a vorlauf and collect your first runnings into the boil kettle you still have not inactivated any enzymes in the wort that is in the BK until you turn on the burner and get the wort heated up well past 170 F.  Same goes for the grains and wort in the mash tun--the 165 F sparge water isn't inactivating  the enzymes (not quickly, anyway), so there's still some conversion taking place. 

Now, factor in how long it is taking you to lauter and sparge. If it is 60 minutes of mashing followed by 60 more minutes of lautering and sparging, then you've got a different wort than if you had done a mash-out at 40-60 minutes.  Both methods may make good beer, but it may be something worth considering if you're trying to make a sweeter, fuller-bodied beer.

Offline kramerog

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Re: Missing Mash Temps
« Reply #18 on: September 14, 2011, 09:55:52 AM »
What differences am I going to see if I mash at 154 @ 30 mins compared to 145 @ 30? The first batch turned out well but have a slight concern for the current one that is in the fermenter.

145 F is below the gelatinization temperature of barley malt.  So if you only did a sac rest at 145 F for 30 minutes, you would get a very beer and low efficiency.  If you mash out at a higher temp or sparge with water at a higher temp, you'll also probably end up with a hazy beer due to gelatinizing starch.  That might be a good mash schedule for making a wild beer.
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