Author Topic: safale wb-06  (Read 3657 times)

Offline majorvices

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Re: safale wb-06
« Reply #15 on: September 06, 2011, 02:16:02 PM »
Yeah, Denny and Tom. That's what I am saying, sounds like surfeit to me.  ;)
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jaybeerman

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Re: safale wb-06
« Reply #16 on: September 06, 2011, 05:06:32 PM »
I don't know if I would like your wheat beer, but I know how we can find out. ;) ;D
So via a full beer profile explain what would constitute an exceptable american hefe or if you can't do that then detail your personal ideal german hefe (I'm talking the flavors, aroma, overall character, etc.)

First of all, I'd have to make another batch.  Second, you'd have to respond to the above (I'm just looking for a few details - describe in detail what you like about german weizen and hate about american wheats).  For the record, I felt very ripped off when I bought a 6er of widmer wheat.
« Last Edit: September 06, 2011, 05:41:54 PM by jaybeerman »

Offline nateo

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Re: safale wb-06
« Reply #17 on: September 06, 2011, 05:39:25 PM »
Not a lot of homebrewers talk about WB-06. I've actually found a lot of info about it over on the probrewer boards. I think there are a couple of issues people run into on the homebrew scale. WB-06 is pretty sensitive to overpitching, and you'll lose a lot of the weizen character if you do. Most of the probrewers pitch about 70% of what they normally would for the volume and gravity. You also shouldn't oxygenate too much when you use it.

I've tried rehydrating, not aerating the wort, and pitching about 3/4 of the slurry into a 5 gallon batch, and I've gotten a lot of the same flavors I get with the Weihenstephan weizen yeasts. WB-06 isn't as good, but it makes a good beer if handled properly.
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Offline tschmidlin

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Re: safale wb-06
« Reply #18 on: September 06, 2011, 10:59:40 PM »
I don't know if I would like your wheat beer, but I know how we can find out. ;) ;D
So via a full beer profile explain what would constitute an exceptable american hefe or if you can't do that then detail your personal ideal german hefe (I'm talking the flavors, aroma, overall character, etc.)

First of all, I'd have to make another batch.  Second, you'd have to respond to the above (I'm just looking for a few details - describe in detail what you like about german weizen and hate about american wheats).  For the record, I felt very ripped off when I bought a 6er of widmer wheat.
I enjoy the yeast character of a weizen, both in the flavor and aroma.  The weizens tend to be fuller bodied than the American wheats I've had, and I like that.  They are also generally a bit sweeter and smoother.
Tom Schmidlin

jaybeerman

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Re: safale wb-06
« Reply #19 on: September 07, 2011, 12:16:07 PM »
I enjoy the yeast character of a weizen, both in the flavor and aroma.  The weizens tend to be fuller bodied than the American wheats I've had, and I like that.  They are also generally a bit sweeter and smoother.

I agree that it's hard to beat the spectrum of flavors in a good weizen.  If an american wheat had depth of flavor (though lacking the clove/banana) and managed to be, fuller bodied (i.e. sweeter and smoother) you'd like it?

Offline tschmidlin

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Re: safale wb-06
« Reply #20 on: September 07, 2011, 01:07:02 PM »
I enjoy the yeast character of a weizen, both in the flavor and aroma.  The weizens tend to be fuller bodied than the American wheats I've had, and I like that.  They are also generally a bit sweeter and smoother.

I agree that it's hard to beat the spectrum of flavors in a good weizen.  If an american wheat had depth of flavor (though lacking the clove/banana) and managed to be, fuller bodied (i.e. sweeter and smoother) you'd like it?
Maybe.  I'd have to try it to know for sure. :)
Tom Schmidlin

jaybeerman

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Re: safale wb-06
« Reply #21 on: September 07, 2011, 01:58:46 PM »
Maybe.  I'd have to try it to know for sure. :)

 :)

Offline yugamrap

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Re: safale wb-06
« Reply #22 on: September 10, 2011, 12:01:32 PM »
I've used WB-06 and also find it a bit tart for my liking.  I prefer WLP300 or WLP380.  WY3068, WY3056 and WY3638 are good, too.  They all have slightly different characteristics.  As well, you can play with fermentation temperature to coax different characteristics our of the same yeast.
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Offline tomsawyer

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Re: safale wb-06
« Reply #23 on: September 11, 2011, 05:40:06 AM »
I was getting tartness with WLP300 and 380, but I figured out it was to due to my water.  Built a low-sulfate, soft water with a little chloride and the hefe's are much better.
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