Author Topic: Flawed classic stout  (Read 2236 times)

Offline oscarvan

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Re: Flawed classic stout
« Reply #15 on: October 06, 2011, 07:27:45 PM »
After re-reading this thread I did notice there was no oats in the grain bill..... Stout needs body...if it's too thin the mind wanders....
Wooden Shoe Brew Works (not a commercial operation) Bethlehem, PA
http://www.woodenshoemusic.com/WSBW/WSBW_All_grain_Setup.html
I brew WITH style..... not necessarily TO style.....

Offline tomsawyer

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Re: Flawed classic stout
« Reply #16 on: October 07, 2011, 08:52:09 AM »
A week in primary is kind of marginal.  GRanted the beer isn't real big, but I like to give any ale 10 days to finish out on the yeast cake.

Estery beer suggests a too-warm fermentation temp.  You get all kinds of odd/nasty flavors from fermenting warm.

Estery beer can also come from underpitching, but if its not a big beer then I wouldn't think this is a cuase of the problem unless the yeast was fairly old and lost a lot of viability.

And others have already said or hinted about these possible problems, just getting back on track after the coriander debate.
Lennie
Hannibal, MO

Offline jwiltse

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Re: Flawed classic stout
« Reply #17 on: October 07, 2011, 06:37:35 PM »
What does repitch mean?

I believe he's asking if it was fresh yeast or did you re-use (repitch) yeast from a previous batch.

And if it was a first pitch and not a repitch from a previous batch, did you make a starter?  If, as
you said earlier, the yeast was a couple months old and you didn't make a starter then you
underpitched which can lead to a lot of the issues you're seeing.  Oh and 60-65F is fine for
fermentation temps.

It wasn't a repitch, it was fresh yeast.  I did not make a starter.  Do you think that could be the problem?  I've actually never made a starter - how important is that?  (I've never understood why it's necessary - yeast seem to multiply so fast that even without a starter my carboy is always vigorously fermenting after 24-48 hours)

Offline hokerer

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Re: Flawed classic stout
« Reply #18 on: October 07, 2011, 06:55:52 PM »
It's when they're 'multiplying so fast' that bad things happen.  The strain of them trying to multiply enough to chew through your wort causes them to kick out off flavors and such.  You want to pitch enough yeast that they don't have to strain so much.

Assuming you were about 1.056 or so, the yeast pitching calculator at mrmalty.com says that, in order for you to have pitched enough yeast, you should have either made about a half gallon starter or pitched two yeast packs.  You only pitched one pack (and a slightly old one at that) so yeah, you underpitched.
« Last Edit: October 09, 2011, 02:34:00 PM by hokerer »
Joe

Offline davidgzach

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Re: Flawed classic stout
« Reply #19 on: October 10, 2011, 10:36:05 AM »


It wasn't a repitch, it was fresh yeast.  I did not make a starter.  Do you think that could be the problem?  I've actually never made a starter - how important is that?  (I've never understood why it's necessary - yeast seem to multiply so fast that even without a starter my carboy is always vigorously fermenting after 24-48 hours)
[/quote]

Pitching the correct amount of yeast is VERY important to making great beer.  Especially higher gravity ales and any lager.  Underpitched yeast will struggle to multiply and produce off-flavors.  You'll see your carboy vigorously fermenting after 2-3 hours versus 24-48!     ;)
Dave Zach