Author Topic: Why Does Carapils Get a Bad Rap?  (Read 5412 times)

Offline James Lorden

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Re: Why Does Carapils Get a Bad Rap?
« Reply #15 on: October 10, 2011, 03:49:08 PM »


Personally, I think that mashing higher gives me different results than using carapils.  Although, until I do side by side brews to test that, I wouldn't swear to it.

I have to agree. As a commercial example I'd present both Firestone Walker Pale 31 and Union Jack.  Per Bryndalson both have a 145 1st step for 50 minutes and both have significant carapils (around 5%).
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Offline blatz

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Re: Why Does Carapils Get a Bad Rap?
« Reply #16 on: October 11, 2011, 11:27:25 AM »


Personally, I think that mashing higher gives me different results than using carapils.  Although, until I do side by side brews to test that, I wouldn't swear to it.

I have to agree. As a commercial example I'd present both Firestone Walker Pale 31 and Union Jack.  Per Bryndalson both have a 145 1st step for 50 minutes and both have significant carapils (around 5%).

James brings up a very good point - there are plenty of commercial brewers that use the dextrin malts - including FW, Russian River, and Sierra Nevada had it in Torpedo until just recently, to name a few of the top of my head..  I have to think that from a cost differential, if pros could make the same end product with base malt and a slightly higher mash temp rather than having to bring in specialty malt, they certainly would.

I use about 8% carafoam in my dortmunder - and it certainly has a different malt flavor than does my helles which is otherwise an identical grist, although 1 Plato lower.
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Offline EHall

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Re: Why Does Carapils Get a Bad Rap?
« Reply #17 on: October 11, 2011, 02:14:53 PM »
its due to it being a very narcissistic, arrogant malt. Spewing its propaganda about how 'I'm the only malt that can give great body/mouthfeel to your brews... I can see how the base malts would be angry with this.
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Offline dean

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Re: Why Does Carapils Get a Bad Rap?
« Reply #18 on: October 19, 2011, 05:54:31 PM »
Don't think the point is that it might hurt anything but rather that is doesn't particularly help anything.  Get all your processes straight and there's no role for it so why bother.

I don't find that there's no point to it.  It's just another tool in the toolbox.  Like a screwdriver or hammer, you choose thew tool for the job you need to do.  

ETA: Yeah, what Keith said!

Horses for courses and all that.  Ya use the best tool for the job at hand.    Denny are you sure you aren't a terrierman?   ;) 

Offline majorvices

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Re: Why Does Carapils Get a Bad Rap?
« Reply #19 on: October 20, 2011, 05:14:42 AM »
don't put too much stock behind reasoning at least w/RR, Paul. When I met Vinnie a few years ago I asked him about the Cara pils and he said something to the effect that he just through it in there on the test batch and was reluctant to change it. At least that was the pression he left me with.
« Last Edit: October 20, 2011, 01:28:40 PM by majorvices »
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Offline blatz

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Re: Why Does Carapils Get a Bad Rap?
« Reply #20 on: October 20, 2011, 06:29:18 AM »
I hear you Keith.  Another good example is Green Flash West Coast IPA - I believe they use a significant amount of carapils.

I honestly think if it weren't named 'Carapils' and described to add foam stability and body, and instead called extralight crystal' or C-5L or something like that, nobody would have a problem with it.
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Online theDarkSide

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Re: Why Does Carapils Get a Bad Rap?
« Reply #21 on: October 20, 2011, 06:51:39 AM »
I hear you Keith.  Another good example is Green Flash West Coast IPA - I believe they use a significant amount of carapils.

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Offline james

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Re: Why Does Carapils Get a Bad Rap?
« Reply #22 on: October 20, 2011, 07:51:32 AM »
I honestly think if it weren't named 'Carapils' and described to add foam stability and body, and instead called extralight crystal' or C-5L or something like that, nobody would have a problem with it.

Lets just call it dextrin malt then instead of carapils or carafoam

Offline denny

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Re: Why Does Carapils Get a Bad Rap?
« Reply #23 on: October 20, 2011, 08:30:15 AM »
Denny are you sure you aren't a terrierman?   ;) 

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Offline bluesman

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Re: Why Does Carapils Get a Bad Rap?
« Reply #24 on: October 20, 2011, 09:47:29 AM »
I'm not completely convinced one way or the other as to it's effect on the finished beer, but I still use it in my IPA and other recipes with very good results. I would also like to do a side by side to better understand the flavor/mouthfeel effects of carapils.

I will continue to use it, as I like the results I'm getting with it...and I agree with Vinnie C.... "I'm reluctant to change it".
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