Author Topic: 2112 fermentation plan  (Read 8067 times)

Offline Pinski

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2112 fermentation plan
« on: October 10, 2011, 10:00:22 AM »
Brewed up my first lager last weekend.  Ended up getting much better extraction than my first few all grain batches so it feels like my process is improving.  I'm using the WY2122 SF Lager yeast and wondering;

What temperature and duration do folks like to primary? (I've got the control set to 60*)

Because of the relatively high fermentation temp is a diacetyl rest necessary with this yeast strain?

What temperature and duration do folks like for secondary?

Temp and duration to condition?

Seems like people are all over the place with this yeast so I'm hoping to find a pattern somewhere. Thanks!
Thank you BEER!

Offline morticaixavier

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Re: 2112 fermentation plan
« Reply #1 on: October 10, 2011, 10:08:55 AM »
Are you after a steam beer? When I am doing a cali-common i do a primary at 60-62f I do a d-rest but I don't know if I really need to. I don't bother with secondary and condition for anywhere from 1 to 6 weeks. This style was historically tapped quite young without any real lagering (think central cali in the 19th century, not a lot of refridgeration)
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Offline davidgzach

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Re: 2112 fermentation plan
« Reply #2 on: October 10, 2011, 10:15:12 AM »
2112 holds lager characteristics up to 68F+.  I use this exclusivery for my Steam Beers.  I've never done a d-rest with this strain and I usually ferment it at around 68.  Primary is typically 5-7 days to ferment, then condition for a week and straight to keg for secondary.  I've tapped it from 1-4 weeks afterwards and always have a great brew.  It's one of my favorite styles and a crowd pleaser.  At 60F it may take a bit longer to ferment, especially if you did not make a starter.

What was the style of beer you were brewing?

Dave
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Offline davidgzach

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Re: 2112 fermentation plan
« Reply #3 on: October 10, 2011, 10:21:06 AM »
Are you after a steam beer? When I am doing a cali-common i do a primary at 60-62f I do a d-rest but I don't know if I really need to. I don't bother with secondary and condition for anywhere from 1 to 6 weeks. This style was historically tapped quite young without any real lagering (think central cali in the 19th century, not a lot of refridgeration)

A little trivia-The name Steam Beer came from the pressure that built up inside the kegs that would "steam" when tapped during gold rush San Fran.  We now legally have to call it "California Common" as Anchor Steam trademarked the term "steam".  From our friend Ray Daniels-Designing Great Beers.......
Dave Zach

Offline morticaixavier

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Re: 2112 fermentation plan
« Reply #4 on: October 10, 2011, 10:47:44 AM »
Are you after a steam beer? When I am doing a cali-common i do a primary at 60-62f I do a d-rest but I don't know if I really need to. I don't bother with secondary and condition for anywhere from 1 to 6 weeks. This style was historically tapped quite young without any real lagering (think central cali in the 19th century, not a lot of refridgeration)

A little trivia-The name Steam Beer came from the pressure that built up inside the kegs that would "steam" when tapped during gold rush San Fran.  We now legally have to call it "California Common" as Anchor Steam trademarked the term "steam".  From our friend Ray Daniels-Designing Great Beers.......

Well WE don't have to call it california common unless we are going to sell it. I actually prefer cali-common now just cause I am grumpy with Mr. Maytag for trademarking the name and don't want to associate my beer with his (Which is good beer, but still grumpy >:()
"Creativity is the residue of wasted time" - A. Einstein

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Offline Pinski

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Re: 2112 fermentation plan
« Reply #5 on: October 10, 2011, 11:21:37 AM »
"then condition for a week and straight to keg for secondary."

I thought conditioning occured in the keg/bottle after primary and secondary fermentation?

 "What was the style of beer you were brewing?"

Well, the recipe came from a friend that called it a Creemore Clone. I've added some dextrine malt and some Willamette FWH, so needless to say, I've strayed outside the bounds of a Premium American Lager.  So, at OG 1.060 and ~29 IBU, I think I'll call it an EXTRA Premium American Lager. ;)

Thank you BEER!

Offline davidgzach

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Re: 2112 fermentation plan
« Reply #6 on: October 10, 2011, 11:24:46 AM »
A little trivia-The name Steam Beer came from the pressure that built up inside the kegs that would "steam" when tapped during gold rush San Fran.  We now legally have to call it "California Common" as Anchor Steam trademarked the term "steam".  From our friend Ray Daniels-Designing Great Beers.......
[/quote]

Well WE don't have to call it california common unless we are going to sell it. I actually prefer cali-common now just cause I am grumpy with Mr. Maytag for trademarking the name and don't want to associate my beer with his (Which is good beer, but still grumpy >:()
[/quote]

Agreed!  I still call it a Steam Beer out of pure disregard...... :)
Dave Zach

Offline davidgzach

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Re: 2112 fermentation plan
« Reply #7 on: October 10, 2011, 11:32:28 AM »
"then condition for a week and straight to keg for secondary."

I thought conditioning occured in the keg/bottle after primary and secondary fermentation?

 "What was the style of beer you were brewing?"

Well, the recipe came from a friend that called it a Creemore Clone. I've added some dextrine malt and some Willamette FWH, so needless to say, I've strayed outside the bounds of a Premium American Lager.  So, at OG 1.060 and ~29 IBU, I think I'll call it an EXTRA Premium American Lager. ;)


Conditioning starts once fermentation is complete.  It's still the same process, just on the yeast cake. 

Sounds like you have quite an interesting brew going here.  You should still get the sour note out of the 2112 but it will be clean at a 62F fermentation.  At 1.060OG did you make a starter?  If not you may get some sulphur and diacetyl.
Dave Zach

Offline Pinski

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Re: 2112 fermentation plan
« Reply #8 on: October 10, 2011, 11:42:42 AM »
I did a 3 qt. starter from 2 smack packs.
Thank you BEER!

Offline davidgzach

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Re: 2112 fermentation plan
« Reply #9 on: October 10, 2011, 01:27:35 PM »
I did a 3 qt. starter from 2 smack packs.

You are good to go!  Please report back on how this tasted.  Should be a good brew.  I love 2112......
Dave Zach

Offline 1vertical

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Re: 2112 fermentation plan
« Reply #10 on: June 16, 2012, 01:15:19 PM »
I thought I would bump this old thread
1. bc no one ever finished or got back with the requested reply
and
2.  I have a little discussion on experience with this strain.
I fermented a nice 1.056 o.g. mostly pils beer with this and
did make a good 1 qt starter on the stirplate and used med ox
to saturate the wert at pitching....it fermented to barely the
stated attenuation levels with some difficulty and swirling temps
were ambient but within the 60 degree area.

I was some what dissapointed in it's performance.
I kept the yeast cake and dumped fresh oxygenated wert on
the 3 day old yeast cake and barely had any lag time and
fermentation is ongoing with the temperature on the higher
end at 68-70 f.  I will have hopefully if I don't forget
interesting results to report back with.

My main concern or question is what characteristics are
flavor profiles of this strain when fermented at the upper
end of it's reported temp. range?  it seems to be happier
at the 70 degree area IMO.
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Offline davidgzach

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Re: 2112 fermentation plan
« Reply #11 on: June 18, 2012, 05:41:15 AM »
Yep, the whole idea around the strain is that is holds lager characteristics at higher temps.  I typically ferment 2112 around 65F.  70F is a little high but not extreme.  I'd be interested to hear how it comes out.

Dave
Dave Zach

Offline bwana

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Re: 2112 fermentation plan
« Reply #12 on: June 18, 2012, 07:27:53 AM »
Brewed up my first lager last weekend.  Ended up getting much better extraction than my first few all grain batches so it feels like my process is improving.  I'm using the WY2122 SF Lager yeast and wondering;

What temperature and duration do folks like to primary? (I've got the control set to 60*)

Because of the relatively high fermentation temp is a diacetyl rest necessary with this yeast strain?

What temperature and duration do folks like for secondary? There is no need for a D rest with this yeast.

Temp and duration to condition?

Seems like people are all over the place with this yeast so I'm hoping to find a pattern somewhere. Thanks!
No need for a D rest with this yeast.
« Last Edit: June 18, 2012, 11:03:29 AM by bwana »

Offline lornemagill

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Re: 2112 fermentation plan
« Reply #13 on: June 18, 2012, 07:46:53 AM »
fritz maytag came into a dive bar called the irish bank in sf one afternoon.  just doing a follow up/ seeing if they needed anything, i chatted with him for a bit, we talked about old potrero rye wiskey, he left.  then my friend behind the bar told me who he was, i was impressed he was doing the leg work.

Offline beersk

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Re: 2112 fermentation plan
« Reply #14 on: June 18, 2012, 12:35:41 PM »
Yep, the whole idea around the strain is that is holds lager characteristics at higher temps.  I typically ferment 2112 around 65F.  70F is a little high but not extreme.  I'd be interested to hear how it comes out.

Dave

The same is true for Wyeast Bohemian lager strain.
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