Author Topic: Home smoked malt  (Read 4473 times)

Offline hopfenundmalz

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Re: Home smoked malt
« Reply #15 on: October 18, 2011, 04:03:23 PM »
not that you are likely to use the smoked malt as a base

The next beer to be brewed is a Graetzer using 100% smoked wheat malt, over oak.  Tried to keep the grain as cool as possible on my set up.  Will see how it works.

I am still researching this subject but I toasted 10 pbs of malt in the oven at 230 for 2 hours and had no problems with conversion. I did not add water in any way though so that might change things up a bit. I know dark kilned malts are roasted at 300+ and that will denature the enzymes for sure, at least after a while. I have yet to find a resource that simply says 'at x degrees for t minutes you will/will not denature the enzymes'. for now I am reading a malting text from the 1880's and am only about 1/3 through. perhaps I will have better answers in a couple more days.

Too be clear, I was able to keep the temps below 150F for all of the smoking batches (20 lbs total).  Often more like 120-130F.  Not cold but cool as such things might go on my stuff.  Will see how this converts in a couple of days.  I think it will be OK.
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Offline morticaixavier

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Re: Home smoked malt
« Reply #16 on: October 19, 2011, 08:56:39 AM »
not that you are likely to use the smoked malt as a base

The next beer to be brewed is a Graetzer using 100% smoked wheat malt, over oak.  Tried to keep the grain as cool as possible on my set up.  Will see how it works.

I am still researching this subject but I toasted 10 pbs of malt in the oven at 230 for 2 hours and had no problems with conversion. I did not add water in any way though so that might change things up a bit. I know dark kilned malts are roasted at 300+ and that will denature the enzymes for sure, at least after a while. I have yet to find a resource that simply says 'at x degrees for t minutes you will/will not denature the enzymes'. for now I am reading a malting text from the 1880's and am only about 1/3 through. perhaps I will have better answers in a couple more days.

Too be clear, I was able to keep the temps below 150F for all of the smoking batches (20 lbs total).  Often more like 120-130F.  Not cold but cool as such things might go on my stuff.  Will see how this converts in a couple of days.  I think it will be OK.

yeah at 150 you will be fine.
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Online Jimmy K

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Re: Home smoked malt
« Reply #17 on: October 19, 2011, 01:43:19 PM »
I think a cold smoke box with multiple screens stacked vertically and a small circulating fan would work well - A convection smoker.
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Offline jeffy

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Re: Home smoked malt
« Reply #18 on: October 19, 2011, 05:23:07 PM »
I think a cold smoke box with multiple screens stacked vertically and a small circulating fan would work well - A convection smoker.

You mean like the one in this thread?  http://www.homebrewersassociation.org/forum/index.php?topic=2814.0
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Offline tschmidlin

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Re: Home smoked malt
« Reply #19 on: October 19, 2011, 10:46:26 PM »
I think a cold smoke box with multiple screens stacked vertically and a small circulating fan would work well - A convection smoker.

You mean like the one in this thread?  http://www.homebrewersassociation.org/forum/index.php?topic=2814.0
I missed that the first time it went through, looks awesome Jeff. :)
Tom Schmidlin

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Re: Home smoked malt
« Reply #20 on: October 27, 2011, 06:14:07 AM »
I think a cold smoke box with multiple screens stacked vertically and a small circulating fan would work well - A convection smoker.

You mean like the one in this thread?  http://www.homebrewersassociation.org/forum/index.php?topic=2814.0

That's cool (smoke)!
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Offline gmac

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Re: Home smoked malt
« Reply #21 on: October 27, 2011, 12:28:23 PM »
I made my smoked porter on Sunday.  Not sure it's gonna work.  You could smell the smokiness in the malt in the box but it was very mild.  Quite nice actually.  I made the wort and tasted it but no smoke smell or taste was apparent.  Nothing smokey in the smell from the fermenter right now.  I'll give it 2 weeks and rack it to a keg and see how it is then (it's probably done already as I pitched a huge slurry from another batch and it exploded for 2 days and now nothing for airlock activity).

Offline gmac

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Re: Home smoked malt
« Reply #22 on: November 08, 2011, 09:38:07 PM »
The beer is done and kegged and its actually pretty good. The smoke is nice and mild and not overpowering but clearly there. I'm really pleased with the result despite my initial misgivings. It's gotta clear a bit but I'm happily surprised with the level of smoke character. Next batch of ribs is gonna have a side of barley.

Offline tschmidlin

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Re: Home smoked malt
« Reply #23 on: November 08, 2011, 09:54:01 PM »
I've got 8 lbs that I smoked ready for brewing this weekend. :)  Glad yours turned out nice, I hope mine does as well.
Tom Schmidlin

Offline corkybstewart

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Re: Home smoked malt
« Reply #24 on: November 09, 2011, 12:50:30 PM »
I made my smoked porter on Sunday.  Not sure it's gonna work.  You could smell the smokiness in the malt in the box but it was very mild.  Quite nice actually.  I made the wort and tasted it but no smoke smell or taste was apparent.  Nothing smokey in the smell from the fermenter right now.  I'll give it 2 weeks and rack it to a keg and see how it is then (it's probably done already as I pitched a huge slurry from another batch and it exploded for 2 days and now nothing for airlock activity).

When I tasted the first hydrometer sample of my first rauchbier I couldn't find any smoke aspect at all so I did a quick mash with about 5 pounds of my home smoked malt and added 3/4 gallons of new wort to the fermenter(12 gallon).  When I kegged it a couple of weeks later there was a very slight smoke flavor, but by the time we served the keg 4 or 5 months later it was very, very smoky.  It may get stronger itself, or other flavors may fade leaving it predominant but it's done the same thing in all 6 of my rauchbiers since then.
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Offline jmcamerlengo

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Re: Home smoked malt
« Reply #25 on: November 21, 2011, 12:56:49 PM »
You can build a cold smoker with a couple of really cheap things.  I use this process to cold smoke salmon.  heres what you need.

A small handheld battery operated fan.
A coffee or candle heater or small electric heater of sorts
A very small pan that fits on the coffee heater
A Cardboard box
An Aluminum foil pan to hold the malt

Cut a vent hole in the cardboard that you can work out of and easily slide things in and out of, also a small hole to run the coffee heater electric cord out of.

Place the heater inside and fill the pan that goes on it with saw dust of your favorite wood(or very small wood chips).  If you're using chips make sure you soak them in liquid....beer is my preference, water is fine.  Soak for about 4 hours prior to using.

puncture several small holes in the bottom of the aluminum pan and fill it with your malt.

PLace the small handheld fan in there to circulate the smoke and keep it running.

plug the heater in and you're good to go.  The saw dust will burn relatively quickly but give you a really good amount of smoke.  You may need to refill your small pan every 45 minutes or so as they burn up to keep fresh smoke in there.


(if you wanna do salmon puncture a wooden dowel in there and tie the salmon to the dowel)  It works great for cold smoking!
Jason
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Offline majorvices

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Re: Home smoked malt
« Reply #26 on: November 21, 2011, 01:20:24 PM »
I built a cold smoker about 2 weeks ago. Basically I made 4 screened boxes and attached these via a duct to a smoker with a hole cut in the lid. I plan on using it in the next couple of weeks.

I have smoked small batches of malt in the past and only smoked it for 1/2 hour and got plenty of smokiness. Overwhelming almost.
Keith Y.

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