Author Topic: Wine advice  (Read 3443 times)

Online Joe Sr.

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Re: Wine advice
« Reply #15 on: October 28, 2011, 05:08:52 PM »
not to be overly pedantic but french burgundy can be grown from any number of grape varieties. as you say it is really only a regional identifier.

Perhaps.  But the classic burgundies are pinot.


EDIT: Removed as my original comment was overly broad, argumentative and made while I was full of Italian syrah.
« Last Edit: October 29, 2011, 07:18:28 AM by Joe Sr. »
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Offline euge

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Re: Wine advice
« Reply #16 on: October 28, 2011, 11:25:01 PM »
This is very interesting. Ha- a bunch of beer drinkers that like good food, liquor and wine! And the $120-250 case is tempting. Get one every month or two.

What gets me that there is so many to choose from. Literally hundreds at the store I stop by at after work to pick up last minute groceries and beer. Literally one entire aisle and it isn't the largest I've seen in the same chain of stores across town. Made some shrewd choices and I've enjoyed every single wine so far- though the Louis Latour Pinot Noir wasn't to my liking at first but the next day it had mellowed quite a bit and more to my liking. It was musty and vegetal in a big way upfront and at first I thought the bottle was bad.

How long can an opened bottle sit with a cork before spoiling? I'm assuming that oxidation will takes its toll. And should red wine breath?
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Offline punatic

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Re: Wine advice
« Reply #17 on: October 28, 2011, 11:46:18 PM »
not to be overly pedantic but french burgundy can be grown from any number of grape varieties. as you say it is really only a regional identifier.

Perhaps.  But the classic burgundies are pinot.

Chablis is a district region within Burgundy.  They are famous for their chardonay blends there.
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Online Joe Sr.

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Re: Wine advice
« Reply #18 on: October 29, 2011, 07:12:00 AM »
Correct. Which I overlook as I don't drink whites much...

I suppose I was too general in my original comment.

To me, that's one of the great things about wine. There's always something more to learn, explore and drink.

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Online Joe Sr.

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Re: Wine advice
« Reply #19 on: October 29, 2011, 07:25:22 AM »
How long can an opened bottle sit with a cork before spoiling? I'm assuming that oxidation will takes its toll. And should red wine breath?

Oxidation happens pretty quickly with wine.  You can buy vacuum sealers that work with a pump and will preserve the wine a little longer.  That and keeping it in the fridge over night.  A day or two is probably the max you would want to keep a wine, but as in all things YMMV.  Left open, it won't spoil, per se, but the flavors will degrade.

Not all red wine needs to breath.  Older wines need it more.  As you noted, wine will change as it breathes. Bigger wines (cabernet, heavy reds) tend to change more, as there's more complexity.

As noted above, I can't speak much to white wines...
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Offline phillamb168

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Re: Wine advice
« Reply #20 on: October 31, 2011, 02:41:33 AM »
not to be overly pedantic but french burgundy can be grown from any number of grape varieties. as you say it is really only a regional identifier.

Perhaps.  But the classic burgundies are pinot.

Chablis is a district region within Burgundy.  They are famous for their chardonay blends there.

Wife and I went to Chablis on a road trip after our second wedding, told the shop owner that we were married the day before and he let us sample a 1976 Grand Cru. If you can put 'em down for long enough, Chablis will age reaaaaaaaal nice. This coming from a guy who really doesn't like white wine very much.
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Offline punatic

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Re: Wine advice
« Reply #21 on: October 31, 2011, 12:58:01 PM »
Some high-end white wines benefit from aging, certainly a Chablis Grand Cru, also some desert wines e.g. Sauternes and late harvest QmP Rieslings.

On the whole most white wines are best when consumed young. 
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Offline corkybstewart

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Re: Wine advice
« Reply #22 on: October 31, 2011, 02:41:47 PM »
Some high-end white wines benefit from aging, certainly a Chablis Grand Cru, also some desert wines e.g. Sauternes and late harvest QmP Rieslings.

On the whole most white wines are best when consumed young. 
The oldest wine I've had was a bottle of 1921 white, probably a Loire Valley wine(Montluis or Vouvray) that was found under the collapsed wall of a wine cave in Chinon France.  I don't remember how Pierre knew it was 1921, maybe it was on the cork, but it was excellent.  He also opened bottles from the late 40's, early 60's 1968, 1972 and 1978
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Offline Slowbrew

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Re: Wine advice
« Reply #23 on: October 31, 2011, 02:56:02 PM »
How long can an opened bottle sit with a cork before spoiling? I'm assuming that oxidation will takes its toll. And should red wine breath?

Oxidation happens pretty quickly with wine.  You can buy vacuum sealers that work with a pump and will preserve the wine a little longer.  That and keeping it in the fridge over night.  A day or two is probably the max you would want to keep a wine, but as in all things YMMV.  Left open, it won't spoil, per se, but the flavors will degrade.

Not all red wine needs to breath.  Older wines need it more.  As you noted, wine will change as it breathes. Bigger wines (cabernet, heavy reds) tend to change more, as there's more complexity.

As noted above, I can't speak much to white wines...

A past its prime open bottle red works great when cooking red meats and in sauces.  Even if it isn't great ti drink anymore it can still give a lift to a sauce.

Paul
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Offline morticaixavier

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Re: Wine advice
« Reply #24 on: October 31, 2011, 03:36:49 PM »
A past its prime open bottle red works great when cooking red meats and in sauces.  Even if it isn't great ti drink anymore it can still give a lift to a sauce.

Paul

+1 when we get a bottle of wine we often only drink half of it before it is past it's prime but I will leave it on the counter or in the fridge and use it in tomatoe sauce or marinades for a couple of weeks after I wouldn't drink it anymore.

I have been told my professionals in the wine industry that, with red wine, if you are going to finish teh bottle in a day or two just put the cork back and leave it on teh counter, if you are not going to drink from it again for a few days put it in the fridge and take it out again a few hours before you intend to finish it.
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Re: Wine advice
« Reply #25 on: October 31, 2011, 03:57:55 PM »
Burgundy Red and White

euge, if you haven't gotten around to it, try to find a good white burgundy.  A bottle (IIRC it had a gargoyle on the label) the wife and I had a while back changed me; it was full, robust and friggin amazing. Otherwise I stick with pinot nior, red burgundy, red zinfandel, malbec, and another s. american wine I can't think of at the moment.  cheers, j  

Offline euge

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Re: Wine advice
« Reply #26 on: October 31, 2011, 06:49:46 PM »
I can get French burgundy. Maybe tonight? Lol Have been enjoying the red wine lately. Maybe too much.  One thing that concerns me about white wine is that usually it is served chilled and I tend to gulp. 

Found a months old open bottle of cheap cabernet in the fridge- one that I've been splashing into my tomato sauce. Mixed it with limeade on the rocks and voila! Sangria! Guess one could always make Sangria with leftover oxidized wine.
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Offline tschmidlin

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Re: Wine advice
« Reply #27 on: October 31, 2011, 10:25:17 PM »
I make vinegar with leftover red wine.
Tom Schmidlin

Offline euge

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Re: Wine advice
« Reply #28 on: October 31, 2011, 10:51:04 PM »
I make vinegar with leftover red wine.

+1 Why didn't I think about that. To you marry a bunch of leftover wines until you get enough?
The first principle is that you must not fool yourself, and you are the easiest person to fool. -Richard P. Feynman

Offline tschmidlin

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Re: Wine advice
« Reply #29 on: October 31, 2011, 11:04:19 PM »
I make vinegar with leftover red wine.

+1 Why didn't I think about that. To you marry a bunch of leftover wines until you get enough?
Yes.  I have a ~2 gallon jug with a spigot on the bottom, I started with a pint of raw vinegar (unpasteurized, "mother" in the bottle) and just started adding wine.  It sits in the closet, now that it is mostly full I will start pulling some out when we need vinegar.  Dilute it 2 parts water and 1 part vinegar to get it to ~4% acidity and call it good.  I'm not canning with it or anything, so the actual acidity doesn't matter, but I figure the wine is typically 12%+ ABV, so it should be 12%+ acidity.
Tom Schmidlin