Author Topic: Economics of Ale  (Read 1721 times)

Offline andyi

  • Assistant Brewer
  • ***
  • Posts: 128
    • View Profile
Economics of Ale
« on: October 22, 2011, 06:05:14 PM »

Long, but provides insight on how local laws impact pricing.

http://www.washingtoncitypaper.com/articles/41653/economies-of-ale/full/

jaybeerman

  • Guest
Re: Economics of Ale
« Reply #1 on: October 23, 2011, 01:00:10 PM »
“We’re not looking to take a $4 shirt and sell it for 50 bucks. We need to be competitive.”

many facetted subject for sure -  I sincerely wish/desire that everyone get their piece of the pie and that their piece of pie is big enough to satisfy their needs (assuming that they have a measurable meaningful contribution).  Secondly, I wish that everyone receiving their appropriately sized portion of the pie would then be satisfied and not ask for more…then I would take the remaining pie for myself!

Offline oscarvan

  • Senior Brewmaster
  • ******
  • Posts: 1707
    • View Profile
Re: Economics of Ale
« Reply #2 on: November 02, 2011, 04:10:14 PM »
Hey, quit yer  whining....... I just paid $11 for a pint in Stockholm, and I was NOT at the Ritz but in a pub on a side street......
Wooden Shoe Brew Works (not a commercial operation) Bethlehem, PA
http://www.woodenshoemusic.com/WSBW/WSBW_All_grain_Setup.html
I brew WITH style..... not necessarily TO style.....

Offline punatic

  • Official Poobah of No Life.
  • *
  • Posts: 4582
  • Puna District, Hawaii Island (UTC -10)
    • View Profile
Re: Economics of Ale
« Reply #3 on: November 02, 2011, 09:04:14 PM »
“We’re not looking to take a $4 shirt and sell it for 50 bucks. We need to be competitive.”

many facetted subject for sure -  I sincerely wish/desire that everyone get their piece of the pie and that their piece of pie is big enough to satisfy their needs (assuming that they have a measurable meaningful contribution).  Secondly, I wish that everyone receiving their appropriately sized portion of the pie would then be satisfied and not ask for more…then I would take the remaining pie for myself!

This is America.  Make more pies!
There is only one success: to be able to spend your life in your own way.


AHA Life Member #33907

Offline tschmidlin

  • I must live here
  • **********
  • Posts: 8130
  • Redmond, WA
    • View Profile
Re: Economics of Ale
« Reply #4 on: November 02, 2011, 09:55:56 PM »
“We’re not looking to take a $4 shirt and sell it for 50 bucks. We need to be competitive.”

many facetted subject for sure -  I sincerely wish/desire that everyone get their piece of the pie and that their piece of pie is big enough to satisfy their needs (assuming that they have a measurable meaningful contribution).  Secondly, I wish that everyone receiving their appropriately sized portion of the pie would then be satisfied and not ask for more…then I would take the remaining pie for myself!

This is America.  Make more pies!
Pie making has been outsourced.
Tom Schmidlin

Offline punatic

  • Official Poobah of No Life.
  • *
  • Posts: 4582
  • Puna District, Hawaii Island (UTC -10)
    • View Profile
Re: Economics of Ale
« Reply #5 on: November 02, 2011, 10:33:03 PM »
Not around these parts!
There is only one success: to be able to spend your life in your own way.


AHA Life Member #33907

Offline phillamb168

  • Brewmaster General
  • *******
  • Posts: 2335
  • Lardy, France
    • View Profile
    • My Job
Re: Economics of Ale
« Reply #6 on: November 03, 2011, 03:07:01 AM »
The problem comes from the making of pies in order to satisfy pie demand. European pies (also called "tartes") are currently sinking in value due to too much greek yogurt. The Chinese have been avoiding making more of their own pies because the global market for china-produced pies is high as long as they don't cost too much, but lately they've developed a taste for good 'ol Apple pie and have decided that they're going to leverage their increasing population of potential pie purchasers to get the US to make LOTS more pies in order to devalue the American pie market.

Meanwhile Greece is going back to eating cake.
I'm on twitter: phillamb168
----
morticaixavier for governing committee!

Online morticaixavier

  • Official Poobah of No Life.
  • *
  • Posts: 5690
  • Davis, CA
    • View Profile
    • The Best Artist in the WORLD!!!!!
Re: Economics of Ale
« Reply #7 on: November 03, 2011, 07:51:00 AM »
The problem comes from the making of pies in order to satisfy pie demand. European pies (also called "tartes") are currently sinking in value due to too much greek yogurt. The Chinese have been avoiding making more of their own pies because the global market for china-produced pies is high as long as they don't cost too much, but lately they've developed a taste for good 'ol Apple pie and have decided that they're going to leverage their increasing population of potential pie purchasers to get the US to make LOTS more pies in order to devalue the American pie market.

Meanwhile Greece is going back to eating cake.

Go Go Metaphor!
"Creativity is the residue of wasted time" - A. Einstein

Jonathan I Fuller

Offline phillamb168

  • Brewmaster General
  • *******
  • Posts: 2335
  • Lardy, France
    • View Profile
    • My Job
Re: Economics of Ale
« Reply #8 on: November 03, 2011, 08:46:02 AM »
The problem comes from the making of pies in order to satisfy pie demand. European pies (also called "tartes") are currently sinking in value due to too much greek yogurt. The Chinese have been avoiding making more of their own pies because the global market for china-produced pies is high as long as they don't cost too much, but lately they've developed a taste for good 'ol Apple pie and have decided that they're going to leverage their increasing population of potential pie purchasers to get the US to make LOTS more pies in order to devalue the American pie market.

Meanwhile Greece is going back to eating cake.

Go Go Metaphor!

Gotta do something while I wait for the coffee to kick in
I'm on twitter: phillamb168
----
morticaixavier for governing committee!

Offline Slowbrew

  • Senior Brewmaster
  • ******
  • Posts: 1657
  • The Slowly Losing IT Brewery in Urbandale, IA
    • View Profile
Re: Economics of Ale
« Reply #9 on: November 03, 2011, 09:18:06 AM »
Based on a story I heard this morning, on the drive into work, China (and India) has also dedicated a large set of resources to acquiring the US pie making technology by any means as it is so much easier to steal a product than to develop a product. 

It's always nice when the guvment finally starts to catch up with general common sense.  Probably just means China stole pies from the wrong group of "influence investors".  I'll wait and see where it goes.

Paul
Where the heck are we going?  And what's with this hand basket?

Offline punatic

  • Official Poobah of No Life.
  • *
  • Posts: 4582
  • Puna District, Hawaii Island (UTC -10)
    • View Profile
Re: Economics of Ale
« Reply #10 on: November 03, 2011, 10:11:17 AM »
It's always nice when the guvment finally starts to catch up with general common sense....  I'll wait and see where it goes.

Now that's funny!  Thomas Paine lived over 200 years ago.  Long wait aye?

And the Greeks have decided to hold a referendum on whether they like free cake or not.
There is only one success: to be able to spend your life in your own way.


AHA Life Member #33907

Offline narvin

  • Senior Brewmaster
  • ******
  • Posts: 1233
  • Baltimore
    • View Profile
Re: Economics of Ale
« Reply #11 on: November 03, 2011, 10:20:05 AM »
I don't see a lot about laws and taxes in here.  Excise tax is lower than most places.  Real estate is limited, which plays a big factor.  There are tons of bars in DC, so I don't think it's any harder to get zoning and a liquor license than any other city.

I think the biggest takeaway here is that DC is damn expensive.  And moreso, a place like San Fran has a high cost of living but beer aficionados know what the product should cost.  DC is full of trend followers so anything that becomes suddenly popular is going to skyrocket in price.  Clueless consumers get what they deserve.
« Last Edit: November 03, 2011, 10:33:18 AM by narvin »
Please do not reply if your an evil alien!
Thanks
Chris S.

jaybeerman

  • Guest
Re: Economics of Ale
« Reply #12 on: November 03, 2011, 03:10:58 PM »
I don't see a lot about laws and taxes in here.  Excise tax is lower than most places.  Real estate is limited, which plays a big factor.  There are tons of bars in DC, so I don't think it's any harder to get zoning and a liquor license than any other city.

I think the biggest takeaway here is that DC is damn expensive.  And moreso, a place like San Fran has a high cost of living but beer aficionados know what the product should cost.  DC is full of trend followers so anything that becomes suddenly popular is going to skyrocket in price.  Clueless consumers get what they deserve.

...and apple is better than blueberry but depending on the day might not be as good as cherry


phil, nice! greek yogurt is tasty though; not so sure about the free cake

Offline euge

  • Official Poobah of No Life.
  • *
  • Posts: 7225
  • Estilo Casero
    • View Profile
Re: Economics of Ale
« Reply #13 on: November 03, 2011, 11:56:52 PM »

And the Greeks have decided to hold a referendum on whether they like free cake or not.

Then they were threatened with the possibility of being blacklisted from the cake and pie market so decided to have their cake and eat it too. And like it. :D
The first principle is that you must not fool yourself, and you are the easiest person to fool. -Richard P. Feynman