Author Topic: A belgianish IPA  (Read 5421 times)

Offline pinnah

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Re: A belgianish IPA
« Reply #15 on: November 01, 2011, 01:49:54 PM »
Just be sure to give it plenty of time to drop bright and clear. I have a keg on tap now and started drinking
it too soon IMO because it has really gotten nice towards the end of the journey. Wish I had
waited 3 more weeks before tapping.

I hear you Vert, I think I can manage to wait on this one. 

I used this yeast recently in a sorachi/crystal saison....I started drinking it right away it was so good.  You know, doing farm chores like putting up hay...I just kept telling myself  I should be drinking it young whilst working in the field ;)  It is still hazy and almost gone. :(

My belgianish AIPA is rumbling and blowing at 65 right now.  Cheers.

Offline rjharper

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Re: A belgianish IPA
« Reply #16 on: November 01, 2011, 03:01:29 PM »
Well I'm probably going against the grain, but I'm using Sterling to start the bittering, then hop bursting with Noble hops (Hallertauer, Saaz, Tettnang & S Goldings) towards the end.  Grain bill is split pilsner and pale, with a little wheat, and a pound of D45 syrup.  Fermenting with WLP550.  I didnt want an American IPA with Belgian yeast, so much as a Belgian Golden Ale hopped and bittered to IPA style.  It's going to be somewhat earthier, but I'll ferment it at 70 to get some fruit from the yeast.  It's called experimental for a reason I guess.


Offline andyi

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Re: A belgianish IPA
« Reply #17 on: November 01, 2011, 03:04:16 PM »

Offline 1vertical

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Re: A belgianish IPA
« Reply #18 on: November 01, 2011, 03:21:12 PM »
Well I'm probably going against the grain, but I'm using Sterling to start the bittering, then hop bursting with Noble hops (Hallertauer, Saaz, Tettnang & S Goldings) towards the end.  Grain bill is split pilsner and pale, with a little wheat, and a pound of D45 syrup.  Fermenting with WLP550.  I didnt want an American IPA with Belgian yeast, so much as a Belgian Golden Ale hopped and bittered to IPA style.  It's going to be somewhat earthier, but I'll ferment it at 70 to get some fruit from the yeast.  It's called experimental for a reason I guess.



I really do like sterlings.  Your plan sounds good in theory   :-\
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Online denny

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Re: A belgianish IPA
« Reply #19 on: November 01, 2011, 03:26:43 PM »

Denny - still using this recipe?

http://wiki.homebrewersassociation.org/BelgianIPA

Yep, although sometimes I use Chinook for bittering instead of Summit.
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Offline bluesman

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Re: A belgianish IPA
« Reply #20 on: November 01, 2011, 03:36:11 PM »
I sampled" Xtra Gold - American Style Trippel Ale" at a HBCM last month. A nice beer from Captain Lawrence.

http://beeradvocate.com/beer/profile/12959/32269

"This beer is the result of the marriage between two very distinct beer styles; the Belgian Tripel & American IPA. We have taken the best qualities from both styles and allowed them to shine through. The fruity and spicy notes from the imported Belgian yeast strain & the pungent flavors and aromas of the American grown Amarillo hops flow seamlessly together to create this flavorful ale.  Straight from the Captain’s cellar to yours, we hope you enjoy."
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Offline andyi

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Re: A belgianish IPA
« Reply #21 on: November 01, 2011, 04:20:18 PM »

Captain Lawrance was the recipe I was thinkng of.  From the podcast, the brewery uses WLP530 and raises it  upto 85F.  The brewer says WLP530 will not give him the flavors he wants at lower temps.

http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f12/can-you-brew-recipe-captain-lawrence-xtra-gold-178144/#post2062494

Offline snowtiger87

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Re: A belgianish IPA
« Reply #22 on: November 01, 2011, 07:09:07 PM »
If you aee using Wyeast 3711, wouldn't it be a Saison IPA?  ;)

I would like to try one with Sorachi Ace and Citra.
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Offline pinnah

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Re: A belgianish IPA
« Reply #23 on: November 02, 2011, 12:37:25 AM »
If you aee using Wyeast 3711, wouldn't it be a Saison IPA?  ;)

I would like to try one with Sorachi Ace and Citra.

 :D You are right with 3711....does a french ipa sound odd?  saisonish ipa?  Belgium really is such a small country.... ;)

  



« Last Edit: December 20, 2011, 12:38:46 AM by pinnah »