Author Topic: Recommended Reading for Intermediates?  (Read 2311 times)

Offline bo

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Re: Recommended Reading for Intermediates?
« Reply #15 on: November 01, 2011, 03:08:34 PM »
A subscription to "Brew Your Own" magazine is great too. You get 8 a year and it is full of great ideas, recipes, equipment, etc.

I agree, although I dropped my subscription some years ago after 10 years or so.  I still refer back to my archive for recipes and a refresher on some of the past articles.



I did that too. Got to be the same old stuff after a while.

Offline dbeechum

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Re: Recommended Reading for Intermediates?
« Reply #16 on: November 01, 2011, 03:26:27 PM »
I did that too. Got to be the same old stuff after a while.

Hard work keeping the content fresh on the hobby, but then you get that nugget that changes things.
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Offline Pinski

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Re: Recommended Reading for Intermediates?
« Reply #17 on: November 01, 2011, 03:49:55 PM »
I did that too. Got to be the same old stuff after a while.

Hard work keeping the content fresh on the hobby, but then you get that nugget that changes things.
With respect to that thought, I really enjoyed your article on quick finishing brews Drew.  Made me want to ask you (or anyone else that would care to comment) about fermenting/conditioning in Cornies. I just bought 4 ten gallon cornies and would like to use two of them as fermenter/bright tanks. 
Question: Would you shorten the out-tube to avoid blowing out yeast/losing beer and if so how much would you cut off?  Again, these are ten gallon cornies.
Thank you BEER!

Offline dmtaylor

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Re: Recommended Reading for Intermediates?
« Reply #18 on: November 01, 2011, 04:22:03 PM »
After subscribing faithfully for the past 11+ years, I can honestly say that I am STILL learning a lot and enjoying my BYO subscription thoroughly.  No end in sight for me.
Dave

"This is grain, which any fool can eat, but for which the Lord intended a more divine means of consumption. Let us give praise to our Maker, and glory to His bounty, by learning about... BEER!" - Friar Tuck (Robin Hood - Prince of Thieves)

Offline Pinski

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Re: Recommended Reading for Intermediates?
« Reply #19 on: November 01, 2011, 10:59:25 PM »
Thanks for the great suggestions guys!  Looks like I have some studying to do!
Thank you BEER!

Offline madscientist

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Re: Recommended Reading for Intermediates?
« Reply #20 on: November 02, 2011, 06:01:17 AM »
I just picked up Brewing Classic Styles recently, it's a good book.  Not sure if it's intermediate or what it is.  I guess I'd say it's for those who are starting to experiment with different styles and wanting a good guideline from a proven recipe.  So I guess I'd say that's intermediate as beginner is mostly just brewing kits, in my opinion.

Yes, this is a really good book, particularly for those who want to build their own recipes.  The recipes here are a great guideline when you realize you can change up the hops/grain bill to suit your tastes.  Before reading this book, I never knew that late hop additions were such a big part of certain styles.  I've used a few recipes in here as guidelines and all beers came out fantastic. 
Homebrewed since 2010

Offline bluesman

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Re: Recommended Reading for Intermediates?
« Reply #21 on: November 02, 2011, 06:17:52 AM »
Many suggestions:

Zymurgy
BYO
How to Brew
Designing Great Beers
Brewing Classic Styles
BLAM

The internet is also a valuable resource. This forum among others. Brewing Techniques, etc...
Ron Price

Offline Joe Sr.

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Re: Recommended Reading for Intermediates?
« Reply #22 on: November 02, 2011, 07:21:57 AM »
I did that too. Got to be the same old stuff after a while.

Hard work keeping the content fresh on the hobby, but then you get that nugget that changes things.

I agree.  Looking back over the years there's a lot of repetition of topics, but I think you get that with every hobby magazine (golf, skiing, etc.).

For now, I'm getting enough from Zymurgy.  And re-reading old issues of BYO from time to time.
It's all in the reflexes. - Jack Burton

Offline Pinski

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Re: Recommended Reading for Intermediates?
« Reply #23 on: November 02, 2011, 07:47:19 AM »
Currently subscribed to Zymurgy and BYO, generally find them interesting and informative.  I'm on the forum daily and would say that this site has been the most informative and entertaining (not just for brewing) resource.  It's interesting to hear what other folks are up to and have the opportunity to learn from their struggles and success.
Thank you BEER!

Offline Delo

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Re: Recommended Reading for Intermediates?
« Reply #24 on: November 02, 2011, 08:02:08 AM »
Currently subscribed to Zymurgy and BYO, generally find them interesting and informative.  I'm on the forum daily and would say that this site has been the most informative and entertaining (not just for brewing) resource.  It's interesting to hear what other folks are up to and have the opportunity to learn from their struggles and success.

I have read a fair amount of books on brewing and I have subscribed to BYO for the past 4 or 5 years(still good info in it for me). I just joined aha recently and subscribed to Zymurgy and I agree completely. This forum is very informative/entertaining and the back issues of Zymurgy Ive read (now that they are online) have been fantastic.  I wish I joined earlier.

Offline James Lorden

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Re: Recommended Reading for Intermediates?
« Reply #25 on: November 02, 2011, 08:19:06 AM »
I just picked up Brewing Classic Styles recently, it's a good book.  Not sure if it's intermediate or what it is.  I guess I'd say it's for those who are starting to experiment with different styles and wanting a good guideline from a proven recipe.  So I guess I'd say that's intermediate as beginner is mostly just brewing kits, in my opinion.

Yes, this is a really good book, particularly for those who want to build their own recipes.  The recipes here are a great guideline when you realize you can change up the hops/grain bill to suit your tastes.  Before reading this book, I never knew that late hop additions were such a big part of certain styles.  I've used a few recipes in here as guidelines and all beers came out fantastic. 

I agree, when this book first came out I tried to brew just about every beer in there just to get familiar with the styles and ingridients that I might have ignored in the past.  As a brewer I found myself getting into a rut and continuing to brew a few styles that I really liked and got good at over and over.  This was sort of a homebrewers Julie and Julia (James and Jamil) initiative.  After my first cut on each recipe I'd take tasting notes and adjust the recipe for a rebrew.

I finished the project, I'd say I got through about 65% of the recipes but I have rebrewed many of those with my tweaks.  The lesson hear is that you can get very booksmart at this hobby but at some point you need to really dig in and understand your ingridients and their affect on different styles.  BCS is a great tool for doing that.
James Lorden
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Offline richardt

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Re: Recommended Reading for Intermediates?
« Reply #26 on: November 02, 2011, 08:27:04 AM »
I consider myself an "intermediate" brewer. 
I have almost all of the above books and have learned much from them.
 (BLAM and Wild Brews are not yet in my library--Hint!  X-mas is coming!)

The internet is a great resource for intermediate brewers--this forum in particular.  Some things just don't make it into books but nonetheless need explaining, e.g. how to dry hop (throw it in?, use a nylon bag?), corny keg posts mixups (gas in has a gash, fluid out does not), not using highly alkaline water to make up starsan solutions (use distilled or RO instead).

Offline jeffy

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Re: Recommended Reading for Intermediates?
« Reply #27 on: November 02, 2011, 11:53:03 AM »
My most frequent reference book is Greg Noonan's Brewing Lager Beer (my copy doesn't say "new"). 
I also consult Jamil's Classic Styles when making up recipes.  It has very good tips.
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Offline ynotbrusum

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Re: Recommended Reading for Intermediates?
« Reply #28 on: November 02, 2011, 11:57:54 AM »
I consider myself an "intermediate" brewer.  
I have almost all of the above books and have learned much from them.
 (BLAM and Wild Brews are not yet in my library--Hint!  X-mas is coming!)

The internet is a great resource for intermediate brewers--this forum in particular.  Some things just don't make it into books but nonetheless need explaining, e.g. how to dry hop (throw it in?, use a nylon bag?), corny keg posts mixups (gas in has a gash, fluid out does not), not using highly alkaline water to make up starsan solutions (use distilled or RO instead).

+1.  Very good points - sometimes a nugget is found by just keeping attentive to all sources.  I am enjoying Gordon Strong's Brewing Better Beers - some handy insights without belaboring the basics or getting crazy math/biology/chemistry/physics on a guy.
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Offline Wheat_Brewer

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Re: Recommended Reading for Intermediates?
« Reply #29 on: November 02, 2011, 06:48:54 PM »
I've read Mr. Papazian's CJoHB, Mr. Palmer's HTB and Mr. Strong's BBB.

What should I read next?  I love ales,  have my first lager in the fermentation freezer and six AG batches under my belt.

Would really love to hear suggestions from the forum regulars and why?  Cheers!

I have most of the books listed in the other posts, but I still pull most of my ideas and recipes from Charlies' books. Those are almost a daily read (1 recipe at a time), and I've probably read those books 4-5 times over.
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