Author Topic: Secondary or Keg?  (Read 1505 times)

Offline BrewinSB

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Secondary or Keg?
« on: November 06, 2011, 10:02:46 PM »
So I brewed up a pumpkin ale on 10/22 and want this to be ready for Thanksgiving.  I will be kegging for the first time.  Is it necessary to transfer to a secondary for a week, or can I just transfer it to the keg for a week and then carb?  I was planning on cold crashing it either way.  I would like to just transfer it to the keg if that works to make it one less step, but wasn't sure skipping the secondary before kegging would leave too much sediment in the keg.

Offline tschmidlin

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Re: Secondary or Keg?
« Reply #1 on: November 06, 2011, 10:40:10 PM »
Assuming it's done, I would cold crash the primary and then keg it.  Force carb immediately at serving pressure.

You might need to blow off the first bit to get any sediment that has settled, but that's no big deal.
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Offline euge

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Re: Secondary or Keg?
« Reply #2 on: November 07, 2011, 12:00:50 AM »
I second that. Right into the keg from primary.
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Offline davidgzach

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Re: Secondary or Keg?
« Reply #3 on: November 07, 2011, 05:10:26 AM »
Make it a hat-trick! 
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Offline kylekohlmorgen

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Re: Secondary or Keg?
« Reply #4 on: November 07, 2011, 08:03:08 AM »
My main concern with Primary to Keg (which I do ALL the time) is making sure I don't get any trub/sediment in the keg.

Cold crashing the primary helps - especially if you fine with some gelatin.

I usually leave about 1/4" - 1/8" of beer in the carboy. I know you want to get all that goodness out, but sometimes its worth it to not have floaties in your beer (especially when serving at a party.
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Offline BrewinSB

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Re: Secondary or Keg?
« Reply #5 on: November 07, 2011, 12:29:07 PM »
Awesome, thanks for the info.  I think I will cold crash it in a week and transfer to the keg.  I am using 2.2 volumes of CO2 and Beer Smith is saying to set it at 11.37 psi (I'll just do 11 or 12) at 45 degrees.  This is my first time kegging, is that a standard serving temp?  Will it be carb up in a week at these settings?

Offline mainebrewer

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Re: Secondary or Keg?
« Reply #6 on: November 07, 2011, 12:44:27 PM »
I leave my beer fridge set at 40 degrees and serve at around 10 PSI.
The beer will be carbed after a week at your settings.
Don't know how you are serving the beer (cobra tap or faucet on side of fridge, etc.) or the length of your beer line from keg to faucet, but if you bought the standard cobra tap set-up with a 5 foot line, the beer pour might be a little foamy at 11-12 PSI.
If it is, just turn the gas off and use the pressure relief valve in the keg to bleed off some of the gas pressure, might have to do it a few times over a few hours. Then turn the gas back on and set the serving pressure a couple of pounds lower.
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Offline BrewinSB

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Re: Secondary or Keg?
« Reply #7 on: November 07, 2011, 10:25:23 PM »
I leave my beer fridge set at 40 degrees and serve at around 10 PSI.
The beer will be carbed after a week at your settings.
Don't know how you are serving the beer (cobra tap or faucet on side of fridge, etc.) or the length of your beer line from keg to faucet, but if you bought the standard cobra tap set-up with a 5 foot line, the beer pour might be a little foamy at 11-12 PSI.
If it is, just turn the gas off and use the pressure relief valve in the keg to bleed off some of the gas pressure, might have to do it a few times over a few hours. Then turn the gas back on and set the serving pressure a couple of pounds lower.

Yeah, I just have the standard faucet that came with the kegerator and a 5 foot beer line.  Hopefully I should have a day or two before Thanksgiving to get the pressure setting correct.  I will be filling a growler to take with me (also my first time doing this). 

Offline mainebrewer

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Re: Secondary or Keg?
« Reply #8 on: November 08, 2011, 11:56:58 AM »
 " I will be filling a growler to take with me (also my first time doing this)."
Check around the Kegging and Bottling section of the forum, there are several threads on doing this.
"If stupidity got us into this mess, then why can't it get us out?" Will Rogers

Offline BrewinSB

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Re: Secondary or Keg?
« Reply #9 on: November 08, 2011, 09:55:57 PM »
" I will be filling a growler to take with me (also my first time doing this)."
Check around the Kegging and Bottling section of the forum, there are several threads on doing this.

I have been doing some research on this part of it.  As a temporary setup I just cut some tubing to reach down to the bottom of the growler.  I may run the tubing through a lid of some sort (don't have a stopper that fits yet), so I can try to hold the pressure and burp it as it fills to decrease some of the foaming.