Author Topic: FLOW RATE INTO BOIL KETTLE  (Read 2941 times)

Offline Lager

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FLOW RATE INTO BOIL KETTLE
« on: November 11, 2011, 02:03:50 PM »
What is the "usual recommended" flow rate of wort from the mash into the boil? I know it could be important to efficiency and to channeling

Offline denny

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Re: FLOW RATE INTO BOIL KETTLE
« Reply #1 on: November 11, 2011, 02:09:59 PM »
If you batch sparge you can go as fast as your system will allow without worrying about efficiency or channeling.
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Offline a10t2

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Re: FLOW RATE INTO BOIL KETTLE
« Reply #2 on: November 11, 2011, 05:46:02 PM »
For fly sparging, 60 min is typical.
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Offline sailortodd

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Re: FLOW RATE INTO BOIL KETTLE
« Reply #3 on: November 21, 2011, 10:44:18 AM »
For batch sparge (or fly for that matter) wouldn't you run into problems with stuck sparge possibly if the grain bed doesn't set properly before the flow rate opens up? Of course that'd mean that's faster than the system would allow technically... :-\
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Offline James Lorden

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Re: FLOW RATE INTO BOIL KETTLE
« Reply #4 on: November 21, 2011, 10:58:16 AM »
I generally use a pint glass and set my flow rate so that I fill the cup up once every thirty seconds (using 15 gallon morebeer pots for 10 gallon batches)
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Offline denny

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Re: FLOW RATE INTO BOIL KETTLE
« Reply #5 on: November 21, 2011, 11:36:42 AM »
For batch sparge (or fly for that matter) wouldn't you run into problems with stuck sparge possibly if the grain bed doesn't set properly before the flow rate opens up? Of course that'd mean that's faster than the system would allow technically... :-\

I can only speak to batch sparging....it is possible to compact the grain bved if you start the runoff too fast, although "too fast" will depend on your own lautering system.  The best way to make sure you avoid compaction is to start the runoff slowly.  I just barely crack the valve during vor.lauf, which is usually about 2-4 cups.  After I return the vorlauf portion to the tun, I open the valve fully without problems.
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Offline davidgzach

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Re: FLOW RATE INTO BOIL KETTLE
« Reply #6 on: November 21, 2011, 12:17:25 PM »
I fly sparge and have not had any problems with stuck sparges.  What are you using as a manifold?  I use a stainless toilet connector which has served me quite well. 
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Offline musseldoc

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Re: FLOW RATE INTO BOIL KETTLE
« Reply #7 on: December 13, 2011, 01:47:04 PM »
I, too, like the one hour rule.  Since I run off 7 gallons into my brew kettle in 1 hour, this equates to 1.17 gallons every 10 minutes.  I have a mark at 2 gallons, 4 gallon and 6 gallons in my kettle to gauge volumes.  Know the volumes at certain points in your kettle (like a valve, rivet, etc.) and you can keep a pretty accurate estimate of how fast you are flowing into the boil kettle. 
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Offline euge

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Re: FLOW RATE INTO BOIL KETTLE
« Reply #8 on: December 15, 2011, 12:11:15 PM »
I batch and no sparge and do as Denny but I can't open the ball-valve more than half-way after the grainbed is set or the mash will certainly compact and stick. Usually the run-off takes anywhere from 30 minutes to an hour depending on the recipe and amount of beer brewed. Obviously you can't be comparing 5 gallon vs more and expect the lauter time to remain the same.
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Offline malzig

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Re: FLOW RATE INTO BOIL KETTLE
« Reply #9 on: December 16, 2011, 06:49:48 AM »
I batch sparge with a stainless steel braid and open my 3/8" valve about half-way during the vorlauf.  Then I can open the valve fully and drain in ~5-10 minutes (I've never actually timed it, but that's what it feels like).  I do need to open the valve gradually; I've found that suddenly opening the valve completely will suck the grainbed down and slow the lauter considerably.

Online morticaixavier

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Re: FLOW RATE INTO BOIL KETTLE
« Reply #10 on: December 16, 2011, 08:34:02 AM »
I also batch sparge with a SS brain in cooler but I don't have a valve. just a piece of vinyl tubeing stuck through the drain hole with the braid attached with a hose clamp. I bring the end of the tube low enough to start a trickle to vorlauf then, when clear, I drop the end of the tube into the kettle and let it rip. There is some resistance as the tube warms up and pinches closed here and there but it only takes a few minutes to drain. Although wort keeps dribbling out for probably 30 minutes or so after that.
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Offline el_capitan

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Re: FLOW RATE INTO BOIL KETTLE
« Reply #11 on: December 17, 2011, 08:03:02 AM »

I can only speak to batch sparging....it is possible to compact the grain bved if you start the runoff too fast, although "too fast" will depend on your own lautering system.  The best way to make sure you avoid compaction is to start the runoff slowly.  I just barely crack the valve during vor.lauf, which is usually about 2-4 cups.  After I return the vorlauf portion to the tun, I open the valve fully without problems.

+1.  Malt conditioning helps a lot in regards to avoiding stuck runoffs.  I only had one stick - Jamil's Dry Stout which calls for flaked barley as well as roasted grains "ground to dust."  I used to fly sparge exclusively, and would spend an hour or so babysitting the water level in my mash tun.  It was a huge (unnecessary) PITA.  I finally gave batch sparging a shot and have never gone back! 
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Offline tomsawyer

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Re: FLOW RATE INTO BOIL KETTLE
« Reply #12 on: December 17, 2011, 09:37:32 AM »
The other variable on how fast your system will run off is the bed depth.  The higher the depth, the slower it will run when wide open.  A higher bed depth also results in better filtering.
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Offline bo

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Re: FLOW RATE INTO BOIL KETTLE
« Reply #13 on: December 17, 2011, 11:10:33 AM »
I start slow and then go wide open. It never sticks.

Maybe you need to lengthen your braid. I did that a few years back and it really made a difference.

Offline denny

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Re: FLOW RATE INTO BOIL KETTLE
« Reply #14 on: December 17, 2011, 02:45:13 PM »
I start slow and then go wide open. It never sticks.

Maybe you need to lengthen your braid. I did that a few years back and it really made a difference.

I think you may be the only person I've ever heard say that.  I've experimented with braids from 3" to 2 ft. and not seen any difference.  It's not like the wort is flowing down the braid.  The braid is essentially porous.  All the draining happens at the exit. I've even heard from people who got better performance from shortening the braid.
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