Author Topic: Re-pitching technique...  (Read 1627 times)

Offline miguelpanderland

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Re-pitching technique...
« on: November 14, 2011, 09:37:30 AM »
Saved a slurry of WLP 013.

Any useful techniques on how to deal with the slurry before I re-pitch into fresh wort?

Offline davidgzach

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Re: Re-pitching technique...
« Reply #1 on: November 14, 2011, 09:41:52 AM »
I typically add a cup of distilled water and allow to separate.  Decant the beer/water and repitch the slurry.  Some go through the entire washing process, but I have not been that far yet.  This has worked well for me for a while but I'm looking forward to other thoughts on this process....

Dave
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Offline a10t2

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Re: Re-pitching technique...
« Reply #2 on: November 14, 2011, 09:43:44 AM »
How much do you have, and how long are you going to store it before re-pitching?
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Offline bluesman

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Re: Re-pitching technique...
« Reply #3 on: November 14, 2011, 09:49:01 AM »
How old is the slurry?

If it has only been a week or two then it will be okay to repitch the slurry, but if it's been longer than that I recommend making a starter. I like to rinse the yeast cake upon harvesting to remove any trub or hop particles to mitigate any potential bacterial infection. I use boiled water (chilled) water for rinsing.
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Offline miguelpanderland

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Re: Re-pitching technique...
« Reply #4 on: November 14, 2011, 09:51:53 AM »
I've already got the yeast decanted in the fridge.  When saving yeast from the carboy I used boiled (and then chilled) water before transferring to the storage containers.  Total volume of slurry is probably around 3 cups.  At this point it's been in storage for two weeks.  To "rouse" the slurry with a starter, how big of a starter would you make?

Offline bluesman

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Re: Re-pitching technique...
« Reply #5 on: November 14, 2011, 09:56:15 AM »
I've already got the yeast decanted in the fridge.  When saving yeast from the carboy I used boiled (and then chilled) water before transferring to the storage containers.  Total volume of slurry is probably around 3 cups.  At this point it's been in storage for two weeks.  To "rouse" the slurry with a starter, how big of a starter would you make?

I recommend adding some wort (1.04) to the slurry about a couple of hours prior to pitching. Add about a quart of wort to the slurry at R.T.
Ron Price

Online morticaixavier

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Re: Re-pitching technique...
« Reply #6 on: November 14, 2011, 10:28:25 AM »
at risk of hijacking I have a similar question.

I have about .5 gallons of slurry/beer from a low gravity ale with WYeast 1968 that I harvested from my last batch. Poured it into a 1 gallon jug and shook it up to get everythnig back in suspension but there is no noticable layering. Just about a quart of uniform beige sludge. This yeast is like cottage cheese and it doesn't seem to want to rinse. any ideas? should I just keep the whole thing?
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Offline a10t2

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Re: Re-pitching technique...
« Reply #7 on: November 14, 2011, 10:30:26 AM »
If you're going to be pitching it in the next week or so I wouldn't bother with a starter. Just pitch about 75 mL of packed slurry per 5 gal of average-gravity ale.

I like to rinse the yeast cake upon harvesting to remove any trub or hop particles to mitigate any potential bacterial infection.

That's an interesting thought. Is your concern that the trub might be contaminated (which seems unlikely since it's been boiled), or that it might be a food source for bacteria?
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Offline bluesman

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Re: Re-pitching technique...
« Reply #8 on: November 14, 2011, 10:38:02 AM »

I like to rinse the yeast cake upon harvesting to remove any trub or hop particles to mitigate any potential bacterial infection.

That's an interesting thought. Is your concern that the trub might be contaminated (which seems unlikely since it's been boiled), or that it might be a food source for bacteria?

IMO, The latter...I like to keep out any potential competition. If the significant portion of the slurry is yeast and water, there is a lot less potential for bacterial contamination and off flavors.
Ron Price

Offline davidgzach

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Re: Re-pitching technique...
« Reply #9 on: November 14, 2011, 11:09:25 AM »
at risk of hijacking I have a similar question.

I have about .5 gallons of slurry/beer from a low gravity ale with WYeast 1968 that I harvested from my last batch. Poured it into a 1 gallon jug and shook it up to get everythnig back in suspension but there is no noticable layering. Just about a quart of uniform beige sludge. This yeast is like cottage cheese and it doesn't seem to want to rinse. any ideas? should I just keep the whole thing?

In this situation I would just pitch the entire slurry after crash cool and decanting.
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Offline miguelpanderland

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Re: Re-pitching technique...
« Reply #10 on: November 14, 2011, 11:19:35 AM »
If you're going to be pitching it in the next week or so I wouldn't bother with a starter. Just pitch about 75 mL of packed slurry per 5 gal of average-gravity ale.

I like to rinse the yeast cake upon harvesting to remove any trub or hop particles to mitigate any potential bacterial infection.

That's an interesting thought. Is your concern that the trub might be contaminated (which seems unlikely since it's been boiled), or that it might be a food source for bacteria?

Wow.  75 ml of slurry is slurry is enough to do the job?

Offline davidgzach

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Re: Re-pitching technique...
« Reply #11 on: November 14, 2011, 12:01:54 PM »
I should modify my above post.  I would not pitch .5 gallon of slurry.  I would decant, and probably separate in to two containers.  Pitch one and save the other for the next beer.....

Dave
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Offline tschmidlin

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Re: Re-pitching technique...
« Reply #12 on: November 14, 2011, 12:03:39 PM »
Wow.  75 ml of slurry is slurry is enough to do the job?
A white labs vial has a "Net Volume" of 35 mls, so you're over twice that.  That is plenty for an average gravity ale.  For stronger wort or a lager you'd want more.
Tom Schmidlin

Offline miguelpanderland

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Re: Re-pitching technique...
« Reply #13 on: November 14, 2011, 12:13:36 PM »
Wow.  75 ml of slurry is slurry is enough to do the job?
A white labs vial has a "Net Volume" of 35 mls, so you're over twice that.  That is plenty for an average gravity ale.  For stronger wort or a lager you'd want more.

Great info.  Then is the only benefit to pitching right on top of a fresh yeast cake the speed with which the job will get done?

Offline tschmidlin

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Re: Re-pitching technique...
« Reply #14 on: November 14, 2011, 12:29:59 PM »
Wow.  75 ml of slurry is slurry is enough to do the job?
A white labs vial has a "Net Volume" of 35 mls, so you're over twice that.  That is plenty for an average gravity ale.  For stronger wort or a lager you'd want more.

Great info.  Then is the only benefit to pitching right on top of a fresh yeast cake the speed with which the job will get done?
It will get done faster, but you may lose some yeast character.  About the only time I would go right on top of a yeast cake is if I was brewing some kind of massive beer and needed to do a 5 gallon starter.  Also, if your slurry is old you should use more or make a starter.
Tom Schmidlin