Boscos Famous Flaming Stone

ABV: 5.10%

IBU: 13

SRM: 5

OG: 1.048 (12°P)

FG: 1.010 (2.6°P)

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Yield: 5 US gallons (18.9 L)

The following beer recipe is featured in the July/August 2019 issue of Zymurgy magazine. Access this issue along with the archives with Zymurgy Online!

Recipe by Chuck Spypeck.

Some readers may recognize Chuck Skypeck as the technical brewing projects manager for the Brewers Association, the AHA’s parent organization. But once upon a time, Chuck served as co-owner and brewmaster at Boscos Restaurant & Brewing Co. in Memphis and Nashville, Tenn., and Little Rock, Ark.

According to Boscos’ website, it was “the first North American brewery regularly making a stone beer, the original being Rauchenfels in Neustadt, Germany. Boscos began brewing Famous Flaming Stone Beer in 1993.”

Of the hot-stone process, Chuck says, “The flavors created, while unique, are subtle. For this reason, all my steinbier formulas minimized extemporaneous and competing flavors. What really worked well was somewhat of a helles recipe.”

Chuck adds, “This formula produced a very drinkable beer that carried the unique caramel flavor created by the stones. It was our number-one-selling beer in all our pubs. We typically sold about 7 barrels a week, week in and week out, all year round.”

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Brewed 2 times

Yield: 5 US gallons (18.9 L)

The following beer recipe is featured in the July/August 2019 issue of Zymurgy magazine. Access this issue along with the archives with Zymurgy Online!

Recipe by Chuck Spypeck.

Some readers may recognize Chuck Skypeck as the technical brewing projects manager for the Brewers Association, the AHA’s parent organization. But once upon a time, Chuck served as co-owner and brewmaster at Boscos Restaurant & Brewing Co. in Memphis and Nashville, Tenn., and Little Rock, Ark.

According to Boscos’ website, it was “the first North American brewery regularly making a stone beer, the original being Rauchenfels in Neustadt, Germany. Boscos began brewing Famous Flaming Stone Beer in 1993.”

Of the hot-stone process, Chuck says, “The flavors created, while unique, are subtle. For this reason, all my steinbier formulas minimized extemporaneous and competing flavors. What really worked well was somewhat of a helles recipe.”

Chuck adds, “This formula produced a very drinkable beer that carried the unique caramel flavor created by the stones. It was our number-one-selling beer in all our pubs. We typically sold about 7 barrels a week, week in and week out, all year round.”

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