Homebrew Beer Recipes

Looking for a beer recipe? Browse hundreds of tried-and-true mead, cider, clone and homebrew recipes from Homebrewers Association approved sources, including Zymurgy magazine, the National Homebrew Competition, Brewers Publications, Craft Breweries, books & more!

Deer Crossing Kellerbier

Homebrewers Association
Homebrewers Association

This recipe courtesy of Chris Allen uses a single-infusion mash, but you can also perform a decoction mash, as Little Harpeth Brewing Co. did in the pro version. If you want to skip the decoction mash, include the small amount of optional melanoidin malt to introduce some of the malt complexity that decoction brings to the table.

Read More

Beer

Specialty IPA

“A2 Brew Tay” Brut IPA (Partial-Mash)

Homebrewers Association
Homebrewers Association

This partial-mash brut IPA by Chris Colby is bursting with tropical fruit notes from New Zealand hop varieties. Any brewer who has made beers using the “extract plus grains” method will have no problem making this beer. The only thing you need beyond the typical extract brewing setup is a 2- or 3-gallon (7.5 to 11.4 liter) beverage cooler and a large nylon sack to hold the grains. For best results, use the freshest malt extract possible and make the 2 qt. (roughly 2 L) yeast starter. If you help the yeast out, it will make a great beer for you.

Read More

Beer

Specialty IPA

“I Am Broot” Brut IPA

Homebrewers Association
Homebrewers Association

This dry, crisp Brut IPA courtesy of Chris Colby features a blend of classic American hops. Replace these varieties with your favorite hops to take it in a different direction or try the tropical hop blend in the recipe for A2 Brew Tay also found in the January/February 2019 issue of Zymurgy magazine. High carbonation enhances the sensation of dryness and launches the hop aromas out of the glass. The yeast has a lot of work to do, so an adequately sized, healthy yeast starter is a must.

Read More

Beer

Porter

Flubadub Gansett Porter (all-grain)

Homebrewers Association
Homebrewers Association

Learn about Charlie Papazian's endeavor in brewing this recipe with hops grown at the Smithsonian Museum in Washington, D.C.

by Charlie Papazian

After 48 years of brewing, I still enjoy explorations and recreations with homebrewing. I often tell a story about the beers of the first Great American Beer Festival in 1982, which featured 22 breweries pouring 40 beers for 750 attendees. The “microbreweries” that attended that very first year were Boulder Brewing, Sierra Nevada Brewing, River City Brewing, and Anchor Brewing.

The two beers that seem to be the most memorable were brewed by the then Falstaff Brewing Company: Ballantine India Pale Ale and Narragansett Porter. Both were distinguished by brilliant Cascade dry hopping. Both had a perfect foundation of malt character that elevated what I would call “old-school” Cascade hop flavor and aroma.

For those of you who weren’t around in those early days of Cascade hop cultivation, the Cascade hop of today is very different in character than the original cultivars we welcomed as Cascade hops in the early 1980s. A bright conflagration of citrus and pine is one way I recall experiencing it. My homegrown hops cultivated from those original cuttings still maintain those old-school characters.

The interesting thing about the Narragansett Porter is that it was once a regional brand of New England. The brewery faltered and the brand was bought by Falstaff and briefly resurrected for regionally reminiscent beer drinkers. But the version of Narragansett Porter presented at the 1982 Great American Beer Festival was different than the traditional brew of previous brewers and years.

I reviewed the 1982 Great American Beer Festival program (which I still have) and discovered some interesting information about that 1982 beer. The beer that was originally going to be sent and presented at the Great American Beer Festival was something called Ballantine Porter, and that’s what they sent us program information for. When the beers arrived, we discovered that the brewery had changed the name to Narragansett Porter and festgoers were the beneficiaries. It was a dark, medium-bodied porter with a balanced roasted, toasted dark malt flavor. The lightness of corn and a medium malt body accented the flavor and aroma experience of dry-hopped Cascade perfectly.

America’s First Dry-Hopped Beer

According to the program, which was the information given to us by the brewery, “This dark brew uses malted barley, a small amount of corn grits, top fermenting yeast and a blend of Cascade and Bullion hops. Ballantine [actually presented as Narragansett] Porter is dry hopped in storage during transfer from primary to secondary. CO2 is used to reinvigorate the hops later. … The peak for this brew is around 45 days. The alcohol content is over 6% by volume.”

It struck me that this may have been the first modern-day American-brewed beer that was dry hopped. The few existing microbrewers such as Sierra Nevada, Boulder Beer, River City, and Anchor Brewing were more likely late hopping during the brewing stage. I don’t recall that dry hopping in the fermentation/aging tanks had made its way into the process with American microbrewers yet.

I vividly recall that ʼGansett was delicious, and it has become the kind of beer I really enjoy these days. I wanted to recreate it, so I formulated Flubadub ‘Gansett Porter to replicate what I experienced in 1982. It was after I had formulated my recipe that I came across the above description, and to my delight, my recollection jived with the brewery’s description with one exception. My beer is a bit lower in alcohol content, which is where I am at these days.

Bullion hops are very difficult to get, so I substituted German Hallertauer. Their low bitterness and earthy flavors are easy to navigate. You’ll notice I add a touch of homegrown wild Colorado hops. These hops have a sulfur-like onion character and hardly any bitterness value; their IBU contribution to this recipe is only about 3 BUs. My feeling is that a blend of wild hops and Hallertauer can somewhat replicate Bullion’s character.

So, let’s cut the shuck and jive and get on with the recipe.

Charlie Papazian is founder of the American Homebrewers Association and the author of The Complete Joy of Homebrewing.

Read More

Beer

IPA

Sierra Nevada Resilience IPA

Homebrewers Association
Homebrewers Association

November 21, 2018

The Camp Fire--the most devastating wildfire in California's history--has hit close to home for Sierra Nevada Brewing Co. While the Chico brewery was spared, many of Sierra Nevada's employees, patrons and neighbors lost everything as the Camp Fire ravaged northern Californian.

To help raise much needed support for the recovery efforts, Sierra Nevada has created a beer called Resilience IPA. Sierra Nevada, along with many of its professional brewing peers, will be brewing and selling Resilience IPA with all proceeds donated to the Sierra Nevada Camp Fire Relief Fund through Golden Valley Community Bank Foundation.

It is our hope that homebrewers will make a batch of Resilience IPA in solidarity with Sierra Nevada and pro breweries across the country. While we can't sell our creations and donate the proceeds, please consider donating to the Golden Valley Community Bank Foundation if you are able.

Are you a professional brewery or homebrew shop that would like to join the cause? Contact Sierra Nevada Brewing Co.

This recipe was provided by Sierra Nevada Brewing Company and scaled down from the original by Chip Walton of Chop and Brew.

Read More

Beer

Puna Coast Black Lager

Homebrewers Association
Homebrewers Association

Charlie Papazian presents Puna Coast Black Lager, named after the black coast of Hawaii, in the article "Drinkably Dark: Exploring Black Lager" featured on page 51 of the Janurary/February 2002 edition of Zymurgy magazine. The concept of this recipe, and Charlie's article as a whole, is that all dark beers cannot be simplified as heavy and strong. This German-style schwarzbier is an example of a dark beer that is very similar to its sessionable, lighter-colored cousins. In fact, if blindfolded, the color of many well crafted schwarzbiers is often a surprise based on the preconceived notions of what a dark ale "should taste and smell like." Just like it is taught on the first day of kindergarten, you can't always judge a book by its cover. Read More

Beer