Homebrew Beer Recipes

Looking for a beer recipe? Browse hundreds of tried-and-true mead, cider, clone and homebrew recipes from Homebrewers Association approved sources, including Zymurgy magazine, the National Homebrew Competition, Brewers Publications, Craft Breweries, books & more!

Robust Porter

Sparrow Hawk Porter

Homebrewers Association
Homebrewers Association

Treat yourself to this gloriously bittersweet black porter, and your heart will "soar like a hawk" at first taste. Served cold, the bitterness is enhanced; served at temperatures above 50°F (10°C), its sweet character will take the forefront. Its distinctly bitter bite does not linger long enough to be bracing. Its sweetness is like an impatient songbird, hidden in the darkness of midnight. As Sparrow Hawk lingers it becomes more enjoyable.

This recipe was originally featured in the Charlie Papazian's column "World of Worts" in the November/December 2013 issue of Zymurgy.

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Weizen/Weissbier

Siebte Flasche

Homebrewers Association
Homebrewers Association

[This recipe is featured in the November/December 2017 issue of Zymurgy magazine.]

Recipe courtesy Zymurgy editor-in-chief Dave Carpenter

As I worked my way through Kent Schultz’s vivid narrative of a September spent in the Hallertau, I was transported to the cozy biergartens and hop fields of southern Germany. I imagined the sun dropping a little lower into the sky every day as the heat of summer gave way to autumnal crispness. And when I learned that Georg conducted safety inspections at the G. Schneider & Sohn brewery in Kelheim, I found myself longing for a tall, vase-shaped glass of the Original.

This recipe is inspired by Schneider Weisse Tap 7 “Mein Original.” I would never presume to call this a clone, but it is a tribute to one of my favorite examples of one of my favorite beer styles. The technical details here are largely based on Stan Hieronymus’s interviews with brewmaster Hans-Peter Drexler in Brewing with Wheat, with a few adjustments here and there. I hope you like it.

I think the key to this beer is open fermentation. Yeasts, like humans, behave differently under pressure. An open fermenter lets the beer breathe and reduces carbon dioxide concentrations in the fermenting wort. It makes a difference in the flavor. If you maintain rigid sanitation throughout the process, an open fermenter needn’t worry you. I ferment in plastic buckets, so I loosely place the sanitized lid on top to keep airborne cat hair from falling in. When the beer hits final gravity, I close and seal the lid, add an airlock, and let it sit until I have time to bottle. There’s no need to secondary this beer, and it’s best when it’s fresh.

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Roggenbier

Rye the Heck Not?

Homebrewers Association
Homebrewers Association

For many of us, urban living is a way of life, but that shouldn't stop us from homebrewing. Mary Izett felt the same way when she faced the challenge of making beer in her Brooklyn apartment. You, too, can get creative with your brewing so that space isn't a limitation. In this 3-gallon (11.3-liter) batch, Izett uses the the brew-in-a-bag (BIAB) method to make an all-grain, all-rye malt recipe. With a much looser mash and no sparge, an all rye beer or a traditional Grätzer is a piece of cake. This beer produces a spicy warmth and a bready flavor that will go perfectly with your cozy urban apartment.

This recipe was taken from "Urban Brewing" by Mary Izett, originally featured in the January/February 2012 issue of Zymurgy.

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