Homebrew Beer Recipes

Looking for a beer recipe? Browse hundreds of tried-and-true mead, cider, clone and homebrew recipes from Homebrewers Association approved sources, including Zymurgy magazine, the National Homebrew Competition, Brewers Publications, Craft Breweries, books & more!

Jeff’s Untitled Dortmunder

Homebrewers Association
Homebrewers Association

Jeff Crowell, member of the Crown of the Valley Brewing Society, took best of show in the 2011 Doug King Memorial Competition for this Dortmunder Export recipe, and it is sure to be hit on tap at your home brewery.

Dortmunder Export, a type of light lager, combines the maltiness of helles with the hop character of Pilsner, while being just a bit stronger than both. Balance is key when brewing this style, allowing both the malt and hops to work together to showcase the toasty breadiness from the grains and the spicy, floral notes of the noble hops.

This Dortmunder Export beer recipe was originally featured in the May/June 2011 Zymurgy magazine. Access this issue and many more instantly online or with the mobile app.

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Pickelhaube Märzen

Homebrewers Association
Homebrewers Association

This classic German lager is dedicated to Fred Eckhardt, who was sometimes seen wearing a Pickelhaube - a spiked helmet worn in the 19th and 20th centuries by German military.

Marzen style favors elegance over poundability. It combines a richer, breadier, toastier mélange of malt flavors and aromas, with a darker, fuller body that still is a festively drinkable beer. The light Munich malt will create bread crust complexity, and although the dark Munich toast aromas and flavors can be intense at first, they will blend, mingle and mellow with other malt nuances during lagering.

Marzen also doesn't favor the hop head. You don't want hop aroma, but rather darker toasted and bread crust aromatics of Munich malt that are balanced by the hop bitterness. In the end, we can't imagine why you wouldn't want to give this style a try finishing dry, crisp, balanced and refreshing.

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Oskar Blues Dale’s Pale Ale

Homebrewers Association
Homebrewers Association

This copiously hopped pale ale packs a hoppy nose and assertive but balanced flavors of pale malts and citrusy floral hops from start to finish.

When poured, this copper-hued beer delivers a thick, lacy head. It isn't shy: you'll be overtaken by hops, but after a second sip you'll notice a solid balance with the pale malt. The next sip you'll start to pick up on the citrus flavors (lemon and orange), and before you know it you'll need to refill your glass.

This Oskar Blues Dale's Pale Ale homebrew recipe--originally created by Amahl Turczyn, which appeared in the July/August 2009 Zymurgy magazine--comes in with an IBU of 66, which is high for American-Style Pale Ale beers. However, you'll notice the malt-to-hop balance is sufficient, and you won't want to put this beer down.

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Odell IPA

Homebrewers Association
Homebrewers Association

Odell Brewing Co. of Fort Collins, Colorado makes one tasty IPA, and the 2007 Great American Beer Festival judges agreed when they awarded Odell IPA with a gold medal in the "American-style IPA" category.

Zymurgy magazine associate editor Amahl Turczyn put together this Odell IPA homebrew recipe, which is featured in the July/August 2011 issue. Access this issue of Zymurgy and many more online or from your mobile device.

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(512) Brewing Co. Pecan Porter

Homebrewers Association
Homebrewers Association

(512) Brewing Company calls this beer a “true Austin original.” Texas declared the pecan its official state tree in 1919 (and later pecan pie the official state pie), and one of them grows in front of (512) in Austin.

This homebrew recipe is featured in Top 50 Commercial Clone Beer Recipes. Find out what recipe was featured for your state! Read More

Beer

Sour Blonde with Apricot

Homebrewers Association
Homebrewers Association

Soured Fruit Beer (28C) is a new category in the 2015 BJCP Style Guidelines, however, this style of brewing is anything but new. Some of the first brew concocted thousands of years ago included local and seasonal fruits and most certainly were sour to some degree. Despite its ancient origins, this style is seeing a renewed birth at the hands of creative brewers around the world.

According to the 2015 guidelines, soured fruit beer can be made from any number of base beer styles and any fruit imaginable, but a couple of key characteristics must be present. First, microbes other than Saccharomyces must be used to contribute a defining "funk" or acidity. Another key attribute is that the flavors and aromas of fruit must be identifiable and must complement the base beer flavor.

Kevin Wright, director of brewing at Hanger 24 in Redlands, California, shares this Sour Blonde with Apricot recipe found in 2015 May/June Zymurgy. Fresh apricots bring the taste of summer to this bright, sour ale. Remember it's important to plan your brewing and aging correctly to be able to add the fresh apricots at the peak of harvest. Depending on how long your souring process takes, you may need to brew the base beer a year ahead of time. However, your patience will be rewarded!

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Beer

Stout

Founders Kentucky Breakfast Stout

Homebrewers Association
Homebrewers Association

Founders Brewing Company's Kentucky Breakfast Stout (KBS) is an oatmeal coffee stout with Sumatra and Kona beans. Jeremy Kosmicki, head brewer, gave us his guidance on the recipe by sharing the ingredients and approximate proportions to make your own that's pretty damn close to the real thing.

The high ABV gives you the jolt of a morning coffee buzz, but with an extra punch. Swirling this dark, molasses-colored beer, with its deep, burnt caramel head, you'll be tempted to take another sip. All the while, rusty lace clings to the glass as it grows ever emptier.

Far too rich and powerful to remind you of any other oatmeal stout, KBS is hoppier than expected, biting back at you. The chocolate arrives late, masked by waves of coffee bitterness. But, the more you drink, the sweeter it tastes.

So, can you have Kentucky Breakfast Stout for breakfast? Well, that's up to you. It might be acceptable on a holiday, but today isn't a holiday and you're still refusing to kick off the covers.

At least you can always make up your own holiday, can't you? Enjoy!

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Beer

Browneywine (Maltose Falcons & Firestone Walker)

Homebrewers Association
Homebrewers Association

In 1974, a few beer-loving Americans decided that the brew they could buy was no match for what they had tried around the world. Their philosophy was if they couldn't buy it, they could sure try and make it, thereby banding together to create the Maltose Falcons, America's oldest homebrew club.

To honor the club's achievement in hitting 40, Allen Tracy, another club member, was visiting family up the Central Coast of California. He stopped by Firestone Walker Brewing in Paso Robles and chatted up brewmaster Matt Brynildson, who invited the club to come brew any beer recipe they wanted with them. (Lesson of the day: Always ask award winning brewers if you can brew with them - they sometimes say yes!).

The club board, led by Steve Cook, developed a homebrew recipe for a barleywine-strength brown ale aged in rum barrels that was called browneywine. More than 40 members made the 3.5 hour trek to the brewery and were given a run of the brewery, anxiously waiting to enjoy the 40th anniversary party in October to taste the Browneywine.

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Beer

North Coast Old Rasputin Russian Imperial Stout Clone

Homebrewers Association
Homebrewers Association

Old Rasputin is produced in the tradition of 18th century English brewers who supplied the court of Russia's Catherine the Great. The Old Rasputin brand image is a drawing of Rasputin, a Russian peasant, mystical faith healer and a trusted friend to the family of Nicholas II, the last Tsar of Russia, with a phrase in Russian encircling it - A sincere friend is not born instantly.

Old Rasputin clone, found in July/August 2007 Zymurgy and created by Amahl Turczyn, is a huge, complex beer, heavy on flavor and aroma, with lots of warming alcohol. It will age well, but with lots of late hops, you may want to let it condition for only a month or so.

As with any high-gravity beer, pitch double the yeast you normally would - it's a great beer to pitch the dregs of another beer into. The California ale yeast does very well with this beer, and can handle the extra-high gravity. The grain bitterness is controlled very well with the use of dark crystal and brown malts to temper the roast and chocolate. The first sip might not be too friendly, but sincere friends are not born instantly.

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Beer

Gordon Biersch Winter Bock

Homebrewers Association
Homebrewers Association

When Old Man Winter comes knocking at the door, it helps to have a warming, malty doppelbock beer in hand. Doppelbocks are strong, dark beers that were drunk by eleventh-century Bavarian monks to help sustain themselves during winter fasts. These creamy bocks ensured that the monks would fast frequently.

Found in November/December 2011 Zymurgy, Gordon Biersch's Winter Bock is a classic, dark doppelbock that delivers a well-rounded, earthy malt profile and, despite the higher alcohol content, is deceptively drinkable. It's not quite as full-bodied as some other doppelbocks, but what Winter Bock lacks in strength, it makes up for in taste. As the cold months approach, the Winter Bock, with its earthy, malty backbone, is the perfect comfort drink on a cold night.

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Beer

Sierra Nevada Celebration Ale

Homebrewers Association
Homebrewers Association

Sierra Nevada's Celebration ale is a two-fold celebration - it's released just in time for the holiday season and a festive event for the first fresh hops of the season.

Found in July/August 2003 Zymurgy, this Celebration recipe Ale is a hop-head's dream; swimming with hop flavor on a pleasant malt base, it will turn away the uninitiated, but thrill those with a taste of lupulin. Like many great beers, it is as simple as it is good.

First brewed in 1981, it is one of the earliest examples of an American IPA, and one of the few, but very welcomed, hop-forward holiday beers. Its intense citrus-pine aromas and grapefruit flavors are a treat for the colder weather months when beers get thicker and darker. Honoring everything about Sierra Nevada, here's our crack at an all-grain version with a well-tested extract recipe below.

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Beer

Dark Winter Saison Recipe IV

Homebrewers Association
Homebrewers Association

Michael Tonsmiere, the Mad Fermentationist, and his friend, Alex Howe, set out to create a series of beers to celebrate dried fruit and cold weather.

The Dark Winter Saison IV, found in May/June 2014 Zymurgy with some of its flavors inspired by Russian River's Consecration, a dark ale aged in cabernet sauvignon barrels for 4 to 8 months with black currants and souring microbes. The Dark Winter Saison IV is similar, aged in currants and a wine-soaked oak stave that helps it become rich and vinous.

The beers smells of dank Brett funk, with raisin aromatics from the currants and some red wine as well. As it warms, you might notice vanilla from the oak. It's a dry beer, but not too much so. It should taste lightly tart, with minimal bitterness and a slight warming alcohol feel. Rich flavors and complexity in a drinkable package, this is the right saison for a winter evening.

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