Homebrew Beer Recipes

Looking for a beer recipe? Browse hundreds of tried-and-true mead, cider, clone and homebrew recipes from Homebrewers Association approved sources, including Zymurgy magazine, the National Homebrew Competition, Brewers Publications, Craft Breweries, books & more!

American Pale Ale

Regal Pale Ale

Homebrewers Association
Homebrewers Association

Big Brew for National Homebrew Day is right around the corner, and its time to start thinking of which recipe to brew!

In the 2013 National Homebrew Competition, Heath and Eileen Haynes took gold in Category 10: American Ale for this delicious American pale ale. Heath was inspired to form the Regal Pale Ale recipe after ordering a Widmer Brothers Drifter Pale Ale during a trip to Disney World several years ago.

Brew this recipe or one of the other official Big Brew recipes and join in on the worldwide celebration! If you are interested in hosting a Big Brew event or want to find a public event near you, check out the Big Brew page for information and details.

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Saison

Mike’s Belgian Saison

Homebrewers Association
Homebrewers Association

Spring has sprung, and it's time to start planning brews for the warmer months ahead.

In Belgium, particularly the French-speaking regions, saison was a style typically brewed on farms in the wintertime and enjoyed through the following spring and summer. Brewing gave farmhands something to do in the winter as well as a tempting beverage to motivate them through the day.

Mike Heniff, author of the following recipe, has spent a great deal of time quaffing his way through Belgium and exploring the styles and variations all over the country. His saison recipe keeps things simple, allowing for the yeast character and some hop bitterness to shine through. The result is a light-bodied ale perfect for quenching warm weather thirst, while still packing a bit of a punch. À votre santé!


This recipe was featured in the article "Beer Ventures: Belgian Beer Paradise" by Michael Heniff in the January/February 2005 Zymurgy.

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Beer

American Stout

Stout Trousers

Homebrewers Association
Homebrewers Association

Chris O'Brien is a homebrewer with a mission. As co-owner of Seven Bridges organic brew supplies and author of Fermenting Revolution: How to Drink Beer and Save the World, O'Brien takes homebrewing to the next level by promoting the use of responsibly cultivated, organic ingredients.

"Making organic homebrew is no different than making regular homebrew," shared O'Brien in his article "Organic Fermentation is Sweeping the Nation" (March/April 2009 Zymurgy). "Just start with fresh, organic ingredients and the rest is the art and science of homebrewing--same as usual. The one big challenege is finding those ingredients."

Of course, if you can't get your hands on strictly organic ingredients, Stout Trousers--a deliciously hoppy American stout--can still be brewed with non-organic substitutes.

Now get out there and save the world one organic homebrew at a time!

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Beer

Vienna Lager

Sweet Mischief Vienna-Mild

Homebrewers Association
Homebrewers Association

After visiting Bohemian Brewery in Salt Lake City, Charlie Papazian had a hankering for the subtle complexity and thirst-quenching satisfaction of a Vienna-style lager, but already had plans to brew a tried-and-try English mild ale. In true homebrew fashion, Charlie decided to combine the best of both worlds to create Sweet Mischief Vienna-Mild.

Here is what Charlie had to say about the recipe in the May/June 2012 issue of Zymurgy magazine:

"The unique roast character of the brown malt and the caramel sweetness of the crystal m alt along with lower gravity represent mild ale-ness. The generous amount of mellow, toasty Munich malt along with neutral base Pilsner malt heads in the direction of a Vienna lager. Belgian aromatic malt always contributes a great goosing if rich malt aroma and flavor is desired. The small amount of Belgian aromatic malt is subtle and has kind of a catalytic effect, helping emphasize the Munich and Crystal.

Dry hopping with Crystal hops imparts an aromatic character appropriate to both English ales and German lagers. I wanted to give this beer a lager-like emphasis in bitterness and flavor, so I used German Hallertauer in the long bittering boil and American Mt. Hood to contribute a honey and floral-like flavor, though with a 45-minute boil most of that character is minimized. The overall balance of this beer emphasized subtlety yet offers satisfaction in those thirst and sessionable occasions."

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Beer

Fruit Beer

“Thank’s Curt” Blackberry Baltic Porter

Homebrewers Association
Homebrewers Association

Have you ever found yourself in the situation where you can't decide whether to enjoy a Baltic porter or fruit mead first? National Homebrew Competition 2009 Ninkasi Award-Winner Gordon Strong has the answer: blend the two to create a mead-porter hybrid!

In the 2009 National Homebrew Competition, Strong took gold in Category 20: Fruit Beer, with his blackberry Baltic porter he dubbed "Thanks, Curt." In order to achieve the blackberry profile, Strong blended in a sweet black berry melomel, courtesy of his friend and 2005 Meadmaker of the Year Curt Stock, prior to serving. As the judges noted, the result was a fascinating balance of malt and hops with the acidity and sweetness of the blackberry melomel.

If you are thinking of brewing this recipe, get the blackberry melomel going a few months ahead of time, or better yet team up with a friend who already has one fermenting!

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Beer

Düsseldorf Altbier

Düsseldorf Altbier

Homebrewers Association
Homebrewers Association

In many ways Düsseldorf altbier is the essence of a hybrid beer. The term “alt” refers to an old German style of brewing using ale yeasts, before bottom fermenting yeasts were widely available. Fermentation temperatures are kept on the cooler end of the ale spectrum, creating many of the smooth characteristics found in lagers but with an ale yeast.

The medium bodied ale showcases the richness of specialty malts while allowing for noticeable bitterness to make an appearance. Altbier is a great style to session for both malt and hop heads alike.

This recipe comes from the July/August 2009 issue of Zymurgy magazine.

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Beer

Maibock/Helles Bock

Jabberwocky Maibock

Homebrewers Association
Homebrewers Association

This recipe comes from Charlie Papazian's column “World of Worts” in the July/August 2004 issue of Zymurgy magazine. Maibocks, or helles bocks, are traditionally served in the spring, specifically in May, throughout Germany. Often described as a Munich helles with bock strength, or as a paler take on the classic bock style, Maibocks offer the malty notes and strength characteristic of a bock, along with slightly more pronounced hop aroma than your typical bock. However, Charlie specifically notes “American homebrewers, be careful. I am not granting you license to over hop this beer.” With lighter, paler notes, a nice alcoholic strength, and lager crispness, this Maibock is begging to be the start to those warm May nights that lie ahead. Get to brewing this recipe now, and you’ll be glad when you have a cold glass of Jabberwocky Maibock to help chase down a late afternoon spring sunset. Read More

Beer

Irish Red Ale

Better Red Than Dead

Homebrewers Association
Homebrewers Association

If you’re looking for a traditional Irish beer for your St. Patrick's Day party that is sessionable and less intimidating than the rich, dark aura of a dry Irish stout, then a red ale is just the thing. With low hop character and sweet, caramel malt flavors that shine through in the forefront, it is sure to be a crowd pleaser with your friends who fear “the black stuff." This recipe comes from author Mark Pasquinelli’s article on Irish Red Ales in the March/April 2009 issue of Zymurgy magazine. Mark describes it as “the ultimate session beer: not to dark, alcoholic, malty or bitter—a metaphor in moderation”, even capable of bridging gaps between stout snobs and light lager lovers. Pasquinelli notes that this recipe, even with additional fermentation time to ward off diacytel, is ready in about a month. Brew some today and have it ready for your St. Paddy’s Day celebration . Sláinte! Read More

Beer

Specialty Beer

Peanut Butter Jelly Time

Homebrewers Association
Homebrewers Association

According to the National Peanut Board, Americans eat enough peanut butter each year to make 10 billion peanut butter and jelly sandwiches. To celebrate National Peanut Butter Day (January 24), we're sharing this homebrew version of the classic PB&J. This recipe comes from AHA governing Committee member Drew Beechum. Tired of "the ubiquitous Peanut Butter Chocolate Porter/Stout" rendition, Drew wanted to try a different way to incorporate peanut butter into his homebrew. He describes that the "jelly" character comes from a fruity yeast choice, and that the malt choices were made to emphasize the bread and toast characteristics in the beer. Using peanut butter can be tricky, as the lipids found in a traditional jar of peanut butter are a classic killer of head in beer. In this recipe, Drew uses a powdered peanut butter called PB2, which has been dehydrated and had the oils extracted from the peanuts by the manufacturer. If you can't seem to find powdered PB at the store, another way to do this is to decant the oil out in a jar of non-homogenized peanut butter at home. By letting the oil naturally separate out to the top of the jar, and then pouring it off the top every few days, you can decrease the oil and increase head retention in your beer. This recipe first appeared in BeerAdvocate Magazine Issue 81. Read More

Beer

Specialty Beer

Gluten-Free Chestnut Beer

Homebrewers Association
Homebrewers Association

Gluten sensitivity affects about 6 percent of the population, but that doesn’t mean they can’t share a homebrew with you! While the gluten protein is found in the most common brewing grains—barley, wheat and rye—brewers have a few different choices when it comes to brewing with gluten-free fermentables.

This recipe, which uses roasted chestnut chips, was featured in the May/June 2012 issue of Zymurgy magazine, in an article about gluten-free brewing. Author Carolyn Smagalski commented that “Chestnuts have essentially the same nutritional content as malted barley except that the sugars are not as readily available. Amylase breaks down the starches and sugars to a fermentable level.” Expand your brewing horizons and give brewing with chestnuts a shot!

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Beer

Lite American lager

American Malt Liquor (Olde English Clone)

Homebrewers Association
Homebrewers Association

American Malt Liquor is taken from Charlie Papazian’s recipe for Pabst Brewing Company’s Olde English 800, found in his book Homebrewers Gold. While the original Olde English recipe is a classic, experimenting with hops and specialty grains could lead you to find a new favorite twist on an olde friend. Read More

Beer

Other Mead: Metheglin

Dry Nutmeg Mead

Homebrewers Association
Homebrewers Association

This recipe comes from Ken Schramm's book The Compleat Meadmaker. He describes the nutmeg metheglin as quite dry while "the Epernay yeast brings out the aromas of both the honey and the nutmeg." More honey can be used to leave various levels of sweetness after fermentation. See the directions below for more information.

Schramm's dry nutmeg metheglin is also the official Mead Day recipe in 2014. Join in on the Mead Day celebration on the first Saturday of August every year!

For more information on making mead, visit the Mead Making section on HomebrewersAssociation.org for tutorials, mead recipes, mead making tips, and much more!

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