Lager

Charlie Papazian presents Puna Coast Black Lager, named after the black coast of Hawaii, in the article "Drinkably Dark: Exploring Black Lager" featured on page 51 of the Janurary/February 2002 edition of Zymurgy magazine. The concept of this recipe, and Charlie's article as a whole, is that all dark beers cannot be simplified as heavy and strong. This German-style schwarzbier is an example of a dark beer that is very similar to its sessionable, lighter-colored cousins. In fact, if blindfolded, the color of many well crafted schwarzbiers is often a surprise based on the preconceived notions of what a dark ale "should taste and smell like." Just like it is taught on the first day of kindergarten, you can't always judge a book by its cover.Read More

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Puna Coast Black Lager

Have you ever found yourself in the situation where you can't decide whether to enjoy a Baltic porter or fruit mead first? National Homebrew Competition 2009 Ninkasi Award-Winner Gordon Strong has the answer: blend the two to create a mead-porter hybrid!

In the 2009 National Homebrew Competition, Strong took gold in Category 20: Fruit Beer, with his blackberry Baltic porter he dubbed "Thanks, Curt." In order to achieve the blackberry profile, Strong blended in a sweet black berry melomel, courtesy of his friend and 2005 Meadmaker of the Year Curt Stock, prior to serving. As the judges noted, the result was a fascinating balance of malt and hops with the acidity and sweetness of the blackberry melomel.

If you are thinking of brewing this recipe, get the blackberry melomel going a few months ahead of time, or better yet team up with a friend who already has one fermenting!

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“Thank’s Curt” Blackberry Baltic Porter

This recipe comes from Charlie Papazian's column “World of Worts” in the July/August 2004 issue of Zymurgy magazine. Maibocks, or helles bocks, are traditionally served in the spring, specifically in May, throughout Germany. Often described as a Munich helles with bock strength, or as a paler take on the classic bock style, Maibocks offer the malty notes and strength characteristic of a bock, along with slightly more pronounced hop aroma than your typical bock. However, Charlie specifically notes “American homebrewers, be careful. I am not granting you license to over hop this beer.” With lighter, paler notes, a nice alcoholic strength, and lager crispness, this Maibock is begging to be the start to those warm May nights that lie ahead. Get to brewing this recipe now, and you’ll be glad when you have a cold glass of Jabberwocky Maibock to help chase down a late afternoon spring sunset. Read More

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Jabberwocky Maibock

Lagers are slightly more advanced to style because it requires proper fermentation temperatures and the use of a secondary fermentation vessel. If you want to try your hand at a lager, Polka Dot Pilsner is a great place to start with a recipe consisting of one type of malt and one type of hop.

Lager fermentation requires the wort to be held around 50°F (10°C) while in primary. After fermentation, the beer is transferred to a secondary vessel where it will be held around 35°-40°F (1.7°-4.4°C), and eventually brought up to around 60°-65°F (15.6°-18.3°C) late in the lagering stage.

If you cannot control temperatures this low, an ale yeast such as an altbier yeast can be used to mimic a lager, while allowing homebrewers to ferment in the ale temperature range.

This recipe is from Radical Brewing by Randy Mosher.

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Polka Dot Pilsner

This recipe is featured in Stan Hieronymus' article "Amateurs, Pros Connect at GABF" in the January/February 2007 issue of Zymurgy magazine. In October 2005, Tom Nolan brewed a Baltic porter that would go on to be one of his most successful beers to date. At a monthly homebrew competition held by the Winston-Salem WortHawgs, Nolan's recipe was chosen by Foothills Brewing to scale up and brew in their facility. Small adjustments were made to the homebrew recipe, resulting in a higher gravity and slightly lower IBU, but it was still noticeably Nolan's creation. After spending a hard day brewing with the Foothills crew in June 2006, which to Nolan's surprise was quite similar to his homebrewing routine (complete with boil-over), the beer sat in fermenters getting ready for competition. The collaborative effort of Nolan and Foothills Brewing was rewarded with a gold medal at the 2006 GABF Pro-Am Competition as well as silver in the Baltic porter category in that year's commercial competition.Read More

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Baltic Porter

This Bohemian Thriller recipe is a Germanic/Czech style lager brewed using Weyermann Bohemian Floor Malt. It has a round, full & complex malt character with a full mouthfeel. Click here to check it out! Recipe from Zymurgy January/February 2010 Issue (pg. 43-44)Read More

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Bohemian Thriller

Eisbock is a traditional beer from Kulmbach, Germany. Known as a dark, rich and full-bodied beer, it's a very drinkable and well-liked dark lager. Read More

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Eisbock

This week's recipe was a Maibock that was brewed all over the country for AHA Big Brew 2002. Maibock boasts being the only bock beer in which hop aroma can be detected. Brew it now so it has plenty of time to lager and can be enjoyed in May . Read More

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Maibock

This classic Bavarian celebration lager is all about the malt. Noble hop flavor and aroma take a backseat in this clean, medium-bodied style that has a pleasant grainy sweetness. Brew up this great German lager now to enjoy it the spring.Read More

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Munich Helles

Revenge is a beer best served cold, or at least drank on a cold day. Or maybe drinking well is the best revenge. Either way, you'll be covered when you brew up this schwarzbier. This bottom-fermenting beer is smooth and full bodied, with noticeable malt sweetness masked by overtones of roasted malt, imparting a bitterness akin to dark chocolate. For maximum satisfaction enjoy with a wry grin in front of an old nemesis.Read More

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Big Black’s Revenge