Author Topic: beer gun  (Read 956 times)

Offline greatplainsbrewer

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beer gun
« on: August 03, 2016, 02:44:17 PM »
Trying (and failing) to bottle a Grodziskie today using a Blichmann beer gun.  I bottled a few bottle of witbier (same freezer/bottles) first-no problem.  CO2 regulator is new. Beer is at 34F and 3.5 volumes of CO2.   Bottles have been in a 34F freezer for 3 days.  10 ft of the small diameter (1/8") line.  Vented keg.  Poured 3 qts of foam.

Any thoughts?  Off to bottle Oktoberfest now.

Offline goschman

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Re: beer gun
« Reply #1 on: August 03, 2016, 02:49:06 PM »
Trying (and failing) to bottle a Grodziskie today using a Blichmann beer gun.  I bottled a few bottle of witbier (same freezer/bottles) first-no problem.  CO2 regulator is new. Beer is at 34F and 3.5 volumes of CO2.   Bottles have been in a 34F freezer for 3 days.  10 ft of the small diameter (1/8") line.  Vented keg.  Poured 3 qts of foam.

Any thoughts?  Off to bottle Oktoberfest now.

Ugh. I usually end up undercarbing my beers with the gun leaving a lot more foam than I see on videos. I would love to help but considering I have my own problems...

3.5 volumes is obviously a lot of carb. What PSI are you keeping the regulator at when filling? I think the recommendation is under 5. Maybe keep venting and bring down your regulator?
« Last Edit: August 03, 2016, 02:51:15 PM by goschman »
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Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: beer gun
« Reply #2 on: August 03, 2016, 02:58:04 PM »
I've never tried to beer gun a 3.5 volume beer. Seems like the foam would be excessive regardless. But getting the beer and bottles cold helps - not sure if it would help enough.  And FWIW, I never fill with more than 3-4 psi, to keep foaming down.                           
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Offline greatplainsbrewer

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Re: beer gun
« Reply #3 on: August 03, 2016, 03:47:48 PM »
Started the pressure at 4psi.  Backed it down to nothing, vented, and increased it slowly until i could just barely get CO2 through the beergun.  Tried from there all the way to 10 psi.  Supposedly it should bottle at this pressure.  Wonder if I need a really long beer hose for this.

Offline Stevie

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Re: beer gun
« Reply #4 on: August 03, 2016, 04:18:20 PM »
At that amount of co2, I'd for sure think more line is needed.

Offline blair.streit

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Re: beer gun
« Reply #5 on: August 03, 2016, 09:10:59 PM »
I can't say I've done 3.5 volumes before, but I've bottled plenty of beers using my beer gun with such minimal foaming that I often "finish" the bottle with a blast of CO2 to create some foam for capping.

Cold, speed and gravity are your friends here. You mentioned chilling the bottles, but to maximize impact I'd recommend getting the beer, the line, the gun and the bottles to 34F. Also chill a pint glass and run some off into the glass for yourself. This helps equilibrate everything (including you) ;)

Once things are cold and flowing, pay attention to keeping things cold and flowing. If you set the gun down for a few minutes to get more bottles or caps, the beer in the line will warm up. Pumping beer that's warmed in the line into a colder bottle will produce foam. Pumping cold beer into a warm bottle will produce foam. Yes, there are a lot of ways to screw this up.

Also, pay attention to the impact of gravity. Blichmann mentioned this on an old episode of Brew Strong. Just like draft serving setups, you can drop pressure either by adding more line or by adding a vertical rise. I tend to bottle on a desk with the keg sitting on the floor, so that vertical rise is probably helping me out there.

Hope this helps!


Offline greatplainsbrewer

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Re: beer gun
« Reply #6 on: August 06, 2016, 01:17:29 PM »
I can't say I've done 3.5 volumes before, but I've bottled plenty of beers using my beer gun with such minimal foaming that I often "finish" the bottle with a blast of CO2 to create some foam for capping.

Cold, speed and gravity are your friends here. You mentioned chilling the bottles, but to maximize impact I'd recommend getting the beer, the line, the gun and the bottles to 34F. Also chill a pint glass and run some off into the glass for yourself. This helps equilibrate everything (including you) ;)

Once things are cold and flowing, pay attention to keeping things cold and flowing. If you set the gun down for a few minutes to get more bottles or caps, the beer in the line will warm up. Pumping beer that's warmed in the line into a colder bottle will produce foam. Pumping cold beer into a warm bottle will produce foam. Yes, there are a lot of ways to screw this up.

Also, pay attention to the impact of gravity. Blichmann mentioned this on an old episode of Brew Strong. Just like draft serving setups, you can drop pressure either by adding more line or by adding a vertical rise. I tend to bottle on a desk with the keg sitting on the floor, so that vertical rise is probably helping me out there.

Hope this helps!
Gravity helped.  Bottling at the ceiling got the job done.  It's a low fill but it's still a fill.  Thanks


Offline brewinhard

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Re: beer gun
« Reply #7 on: August 06, 2016, 06:33:47 PM »
I have bottled a lot of brews that were fairly highly carbed, like in the 3-4 vol range with the beer gun (gueuze, saison, hefeweizen, berliner weisse, just to name a few). The bottles do foam like crazy and it takes 2-3 x as long to get a proper fill in a single bottle with lots of loss of beer and foam. It can be done, but is a pain in the ass.
Longer line would probably help, but I do it with my 10ft line only.

Offline jeffjm

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Re: beer gun
« Reply #8 on: August 07, 2016, 05:51:38 PM »
I have bottled a lot of brews that were fairly highly carbed, like in the 3-4 vol range with the beer gun (gueuze, saison, hefeweizen, berliner weisse, just to name a few). The bottles do foam like crazy and it takes 2-3 x as long to get a proper fill in a single bottle with lots of loss of beer and foam. It can be done, but is a pain in the ass.
Longer line would probably help, but I do it with my 10ft line only.
This is why I bottle condition such styles. That, and I don't want to fiddle with balancing my draft system for a few outliers.
I set out running but I take my time.

Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: beer gun
« Reply #9 on: August 07, 2016, 06:33:35 PM »
This is why I bottle condition such styles. That, and I don't want to fiddle with balancing my draft system for a few outliers.


Yep, exactly.
Jon H.

Offline raventor

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Re: beer gun
« Reply #10 on: August 15, 2016, 04:50:21 AM »
Have one of these...never worked right...gave ups using it, wish i have never bought it...best of luck in figuring it out, and if you do, please let the world know!  ;)
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