Author Topic: blonde ale  (Read 1075 times)

Offline goschman

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Re: blonde ale
« Reply #15 on: January 20, 2017, 02:50:42 PM »
I don't like English yeasts in a Blonde Ale. I think all the ones I have tried added an unwelcome complexity from the esters.

My 2 cents. YMMV.

I very well may not like it but will never know if I don't try it. I literally have only used S04 which isn't very 'Englishy' to me so I thought it was time to give something else a shot.
On Tap/Bottled: Amber Rye, Hazeless Daze IPA, Gringo Mexican Lager, G Pils, Doppelbraun                

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Offline goschman

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Re: blonde ale
« Reply #16 on: January 24, 2017, 06:54:13 PM »
I HATE Avangard Pale Ale Malt.  I know you're not using it; just thought I'd mention it :D

MJ Burton Union is one of their offerings that I really like, BUT it's very noticeable and distinctive.  It gives an earthy, nutty quality to the beer with subtle fruitiness that is unlike most British yeast, but easily as defining.  In lighter beers (like a blonde), it's character will play the lead role.  It might be good, it might not - one thing is for sure, it won't be an American Blonde ale.

Any suggestions on temp? I have seen reviews and comments that it can be relatively clean. I normally ferment ales in the low 60s but don't use English types.

The beer used to be an american blonde and I am okay if it strays away from that a bit. I was originally planning more of a british type blonde prior so this is kind of a hybrid idea.

The three beers I brewed with it were all fermented in the 64-66F range, but (as you noted) it should be good into the low 70s.  I have not found this to be a "clean" yeast strain from the perspective of ester-neutral; for me, it's contribution was distinct and apparent.  With that said, I liked this strain quite a bit in the few beers I brewed with it (special bitter, nut brown ale, UK pale ale).

Side note: When I went through my MJ yeast testing a couple years ago, I found nearly all of their offering to have considerable lag time.  I rehydrate dry yeast and it usually helps in that regard, but the MJ offerings were slow to get going from the original sachets (lag was 18-36 hours depending on strain and circumstances).  Collected slurry, on the other hand, was quick to get to work.

Thanks for the warning on lag time. It took over 24 hours to get going. I pitched a bit too cold which didn't help...
On Tap/Bottled: Amber Rye, Hazeless Daze IPA, Gringo Mexican Lager, G Pils, Doppelbraun                

Fermenting: Maibock
Up Next: Gringo, Pils?

Offline goschman

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Re: blonde ale
« Reply #17 on: January 30, 2017, 04:22:02 PM »
Took a hydrometer reading a couple of days ago. Most of the yeast settled out within 5 days and took the beer from 1.051 to 1.011. Considering the beer's age, I am very happy with this yeast and MJ's description seems to be spot on. I am definitely getting some light pear esters along with a very smooth, silky mouthfeel. I was concerned that the yeast may conflict with the centennial hops along with the small amount of lime zest and lemongrass added at the end of the boil however it seems to compliment them nicely. The only negative I have experienced so far is a longer than average lag time. 
On Tap/Bottled: Amber Rye, Hazeless Daze IPA, Gringo Mexican Lager, G Pils, Doppelbraun                

Fermenting: Maibock
Up Next: Gringo, Pils?