Author Topic: Any Reason To Cold Crash A Stout?  (Read 289 times)

Offline fineleric

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Any Reason To Cold Crash A Stout?
« on: April 25, 2018, 04:07:45 AM »
Does cold crashing do anything other than help to deliver clear beer? I have a stout that is so dark that clarity doesn't matter, so I am thinking that there is no point to cold crashing. I bottled a dark brown beer a couple of weeks ago that used WY1335 yeast that I cold crashed for a few days, and it hasn't carbonated properly in the bottles. I am wondering if I took too much yeast out of suspension with the cold crash. I used the same procedure I have many times before and this is the first time I have had a problem.

Offline jkirkham

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Re: Any Reason To Cold Crash A Stout?
« Reply #1 on: April 25, 2018, 07:16:33 AM »
As far as I know, cold crashing just helps heavier matter drop out, Yeast, hops. I do not always cold crash, depends on the beer, but I like crashing lagers for a long period of time (typically I never bottle condition those so I don’t care about yeast dropping out), with ales I pretty much cold crash in the keg after I rack off of the carboy. If I were to cold crash and ale for bottles, i would probably repitch some fresh yeast.

You may not have had enough viable yeast after the cold crash, how long did you cold crash for, and was that length your standard? It may have been a one time thing, maybe related to yeast?
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Offline 802Chris

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Re: Any Reason To Cold Crash A Stout?
« Reply #2 on: April 25, 2018, 11:46:15 AM »
It really doesn't take much yeast to carbonate in the bottle, so cold crashing likely isn't the issue. I understand the mentality behind not crashing a dark beer, but I still think it is a good practice to drop out as much yeast/trub/hop particulate as possible. Even if you can't see it, you could taste it.

Offline KellerBrauer

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Re: Any Reason To Cold Crash A Stout?
« Reply #3 on: April 25, 2018, 12:42:51 PM »
Greetings - my experience with bottle conditioning and cold crashing is that I condition my bottles in my fermentation chamber at the same temperature that I fermented at.  Then, I sample a bottle each week until the carbonation is complete - typically 2-3 weeks.  Then I drop the temperature down to 34* and leave it for several weeks.  The result is clear conditioned beer.  I do this with my lagers and ales - same exact process.

If you cold crashed your bottles at a temperature substantially lower than the normal fermentation temperature of the yeast BEFORE the yeast had a chance to condition the beer, than you most likely set the yeast into dormancy and it’s laying on the bottom of the bottle.
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Offline Lazy Ant Brewing

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Re: Any Reason To Cold Crash A Stout?
« Reply #4 on: April 25, 2018, 05:35:00 PM »
I've never had a problem with carbonation after cold crashing.  I will cold crash for several days or a week depending on when I have time to bottle it.  Just add the appropriate amount of priming sugar, warm the beer back to room temp, and wait.  The yeast will come back.

I brew stouts and porters also.  When you pour them into a glass or mug, I like seeing the crystal clear liquid coming out of the bottle.
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Re: Any Reason To Cold Crash A Stout?
« Reply #5 on: April 25, 2018, 06:08:58 PM »
People seem to think that clarity isn't important for dark beers....not so!  It's easy to see a bright dark beer vs. a muddy looking one.
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Offline klickitat jim

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Re: Any Reason To Cold Crash A Stout?
« Reply #6 on: April 25, 2018, 06:16:02 PM »
People seem to think that clarity isn't important for dark beers....not so!  It's easy to see a bright dark beer vs. a muddy looking one.
Even if you can't "see" a difference, how is the muck improving flavor and mouthfeel?

Offline BrewBama

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Re: Any Reason To Cold Crash A Stout?
« Reply #7 on: April 26, 2018, 12:07:57 AM »
I’ve had a stout that tasted ‘muddy’ from lack of cold crash/fining. Not good. But it’s your beer. If you see no need then don’t. Cheers!


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