Author Topic: Dry hopping temperature  (Read 1138 times)

Offline nicigasa

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Dry hopping temperature
« on: August 02, 2021, 09:02:01 pm »
Hello,

What do people think of the idea that the temperature you dry hop at can impart different flavour characteristics to the beer?

Generally my standard dry hop regime is to finish fermentation then cool the beer from around 20C/68F down to 14C/57F and add hops. Leave for 3 days and then crash cool to 4C/39F

Would dry hopping at 20C/68F or 4C/57F give a different flavour?
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Do different hops work better at one temperature over another?

If there is a difference? Would a Triple hopped beer hopped at 3 different temps be a thing?
« Last Edit: December 07, 2021, 01:46:47 am by nicigasa »

Offline Village Taphouse

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Re: Dry hopping temperature
« Reply #1 on: August 02, 2021, 09:32:51 pm »
I know a Siebel-trained commercial brewer who makes great beer.  He told me that he likes to dry-hop when the beer is closer to room temperature and his reason was that dry-hopping in cold beer brought out vegetal flavors of the hops.  I have mentioned this to other brewers who say that they will leave a hop bag in a cold keg the entire time the beer is served without issue so some of this may come down to personal preference.  I typically add DHs to the beer after fermentation is complete and the beer is around basement temps and I do the 3-4 day thing.  It seems like plenty of time to get good hop character.  I will make pale ales with Amarillo, Citra, Simcoe, etc. and also make pale ales where the DH consists of more neutral hops like Liberty, Ultra, Santiam, Sterling, etc. 
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Offline BrewBama

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Dry hopping temperature
« Reply #2 on: August 02, 2021, 09:47:54 pm »
I tie my dry hop bag with dental floss and hang it high in the keg. That way, as I drink, the beer level falls below the hops in a few days. This way I get a few days with contact and afterwards they’re just hanging in the keg until it kicks.

I don’t like to open the keg but the one time to add hops. If I have more that one DH I usually start in the fermenter at ~ day 3 with yeast actively pushing CO2 and the second DH after the cold crash in the keg.

Also, I keep the beer cold as soon as I package it in the keg until it kicks. 

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« Last Edit: August 02, 2021, 09:53:45 pm by BrewBama »

Offline goose

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Re: Dry hopping temperature
« Reply #3 on: August 03, 2021, 08:25:50 am »
I tie my dry hop bag with dental floss and hang it high in the keg. That way, as I drink, the beer level falls below the hops in a few days. This way I get a few days with contact and afterwards they’re just hanging in the keg until it kicks.

I don’t like to open the keg but the one time to add hops. If I have more that one DH I usually start in the fermenter at ~ day 3 with yeast actively pushing CO2 and the second DH after the cold crash in the keg.

Also, I keep the beer cold as soon as I package it in the keg until it kicks. 

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Another thing you can do if you open the keg to dry hop is to turn on the CO2 on the gas-in side and let it run at a lower pressure when opening the keg to put the hop bag in.  Obviously, I would start the CO2 before opening the keg and using the relief valve (PRV) to bleed off the pressure before opening.  That way you will keep a CO2 atmosphere in the keg and reduce the possibility of O2 ingress.
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Offline denny

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Re: Dry hopping temperature
« Reply #4 on: August 03, 2021, 08:50:33 am »
I dry hop at 35 F for 48 hours post fermentation. The short time keeps hop oils from being reabsorbed which can lead to vegetative flavors.  It also helps hold down tannin extraction.
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Offline BrewBama

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Re: Dry hopping temperature
« Reply #5 on: August 03, 2021, 01:50:13 pm »
I tie my dry hop bag with dental floss and hang it high in the keg. That way, as I drink, the beer level falls below the hops in a few days. This way I get a few days with contact and afterwards they’re just hanging in the keg until it kicks.

I don’t like to open the keg but the one time to add hops. If I have more that one DH I usually start in the fermenter at ~ day 3 with yeast actively pushing CO2 and the second DH after the cold crash in the keg.

Also, I keep the beer cold as soon as I package it in the keg until it kicks. 

Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

Another thing you can do if you open the keg to dry hop is to turn on the CO2 on the gas-in side and let it run at a lower pressure when opening the keg to put the hop bag in.  Obviously, I would start the CO2 before opening the keg and using the relief valve (PRV) to bleed off the pressure before opening.  That way you will keep a CO2 atmosphere in the keg and reduce the possibility of O2 ingress.
That’s exactly how I do it!  Great minds think alike



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Offline RC

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Re: Dry hopping temperature
« Reply #6 on: August 03, 2021, 01:58:37 pm »
I tie my dry hop bag with dental floss and hang it high in the keg. That way, as I drink, the beer level falls below the hops in a few days. This way I get a few days with contact and afterwards they’re just hanging in the keg until it kicks.

I don’t like to open the keg but the one time to add hops. If I have more that one DH I usually start in the fermenter at ~ day 3 with yeast actively pushing CO2 and the second DH after the cold crash in the keg.

Also, I keep the beer cold as soon as I package it in the keg until it kicks. 

Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

Another thing you can do if you open the keg to dry hop is to turn on the CO2 on the gas-in side and let it run at a lower pressure when opening the keg to put the hop bag in.  Obviously, I would start the CO2 before opening the keg and using the relief valve (PRV) to bleed off the pressure before opening.  That way you will keep a CO2 atmosphere in the keg and reduce the possibility of O2 ingress.
That’s exactly how I do it!  Great minds think alike

I don't dry hop in the keg but this is exactly what I do to add gelatin fining. Works very well, but one problem I run into sometimes is the lid gasket sticks to the inside of the keg when I unseat the lid, and in the second or two it takes me to remove the lid to pour in the gelatin, the gasket drops into the beer. Doh! I keep a spare gasket nearby in case this happens so I can re-seat the lid as quickly as possible.

Offline BrewBama

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Dry hopping temperature
« Reply #7 on: August 03, 2021, 02:11:42 pm »
When I used to add gelatin I fashioned a jumper with two quick disconnects. Then I added my gelatin mixture to a cleaned and sanitized two liter plastic coke bottle. I would squeeze most of the air out and attach a carbonation cap to it. Then add CO2 pressure until the bottle popped back into shape. I turned the bottle upside down, attached the sanitized jumper, pulled the PRV, attached the jumper to the keg gas post and the gelatin was pushed into the keg by the CO2 pressure in the bottle. I quickly disconnected the jumper before 100% of the mixture went it so I wouldn’t introduce air mixed with the CO2.

Now, I just let the keg sit in the cold until the beer clears.



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Offline RC

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Re: Dry hopping temperature
« Reply #8 on: August 03, 2021, 02:28:14 pm »
When I used to add gelatin I fashioned a jumper with two quick disconnects. Then I added my gelatin mixture to a cleaned and sanitized two liter plastic coke bottle. I would squeeze most of the air out and attach a carbonation cap to it. Then add CO2 pressure until the bottle popped back into shape. I turned the bottle upside down, attached the sanitized jumper, pulled the PRV, attached the jumper to the keg gas post and the gelatin was pushed into the keg by the CO2 pressure in the bottle. I quickly disconnected the jumper before 100% of the mixture went it so I wouldn’t introduce air mixed with the CO2.

Now, I just let the keg sit in the cold until the beer clears.



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I've done something similar except with a 20mL syringe instead of a soda bottle. I've only done this with biofine, though, not with gelatin. Gelatin gels up when it cools (obviously) and I'm afraid it might gel up in the gas-in post and clog it. Did something like this ever happen to you?

Offline BrewBama

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Re: Dry hopping temperature
« Reply #9 on: August 03, 2021, 02:29:54 pm »
No. I added it when the gelatin was 150*F straight out of the microwave.



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Online Richard

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Re: Dry hopping temperature
« Reply #10 on: August 03, 2021, 04:07:29 pm »
I did it that way once and it did gum up my jumper hose and carbonation cap as well as the gas-in poppet. It seemed like a good idea at the time...
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Offline BrewNerd

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Re: Dry hopping temperature
« Reply #11 on: August 21, 2021, 09:05:43 am »
Personally I love the idea of getting multiple hop flavors from a single species released at different temperatures. What a value!

Not sure the chemistry of the alpha acids would match up to that. The reading that I've done mostly talks about how the acids change (isomerize) at temperatures approaching boiling points.

Steeping/ soaking hops at much lower temperatures like you've described would just impart the primary hop character, I believe. But I hope I'm wrong.

Offline Steve Ruch

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Re: Dry hopping temperature
« Reply #12 on: August 21, 2021, 09:19:15 am »
I dry hop at 35 F for 48 hours post fermentation. The short time keeps hop oils from being reabsorbed which can lead to vegetative flavors.  It also helps hold down tannin extraction.
How would you proceed if unable to do the 35 F?
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Offline denny

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Re: Dry hopping temperature
« Reply #13 on: August 21, 2021, 09:31:56 am »
I dry hop at 35 F for 48 hours post fermentation. The short time keeps hop oils from being reabsorbed which can lead to vegetative flavors.  It also helps hold down tannin extraction.
How would you proceed if unable to do the 35 F?

Get it as cold as possible.  Still keep it to 48-72 hours.
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Offline Steve Ruch

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Re: Dry hopping temperature
« Reply #14 on: August 22, 2021, 09:04:37 am »
I dry hop at 35 F for 48 hours post fermentation. The short time keeps hop oils from being reabsorbed which can lead to vegetative flavors.  It also helps hold down tannin extraction.
How would you proceed if unable to do the 35 F?

Get it as cold as possible.  Still keep it to 48-72 hours.

Its just as well that I don't do many dry hopped brews as my temperature controlled unit got left behind two moves ago.
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