Author Topic: Thinking of trying this  (Read 1104 times)

Offline Kevin

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Re: Thinking of trying this
« Reply #15 on: February 15, 2022, 06:09:42 am »
Have you ever thought of getting 3 gallon kegs for your small batches? I started doing small batches on my kitchen stove in the winter just so I could brew when it was too cold in the garage on my big system. I had not bottled in nearly 15 years and I quickly discovered I still hated bottling no matter how small the batch was.
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Offline denny

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Re: Thinking of trying this
« Reply #16 on: February 15, 2022, 08:35:33 am »
So, I found a Elysian Space Dust clone recipe that I was thinking of trying.  Cutting the grain bill in half gave me about 8.375 pounds of grain.  Using the formula of 1.25 quarts of water to 1 pound of grain I come up with a little over 2.5 gallons of water I start with, which is my ending volume.  I know some of it will boil off during the boil, but does that sound about right?  I guess I can sparge a small amount of water thru the grains to make my boil amount to be about 3 to 3.5 gallons, right?  I am thinking of giving this a try next weekend just for the heck of it.

Yep, that will work.  You could also mash thicker and use more sparge water.  Hard to say if one is a better choice than the other.

Thank Denny, I appreciate your input.  I guess if I come up short I can always just add water to the wort when it goes into the fermenter, right?  My goal is to have a little over 2.5 gallons in the fermenter and 2.5 gallons at the end to bottle and have as a second beer.  If I like it, then I will do a 5 gallon batch when my keg is empty.  LOL.

Personally, I brew to gravity, not volume. My own decision to add water is based on if I'm over gravity, not under volume.

Thanks, I guess I have not gotten that good yet.  LOL.  I am working on it though

Well, here's how I do it...nothing too difficult. About 15-20 minutes before what I estimate will be the end of boil, before I add any finishing hops, I take a gravity reading. If I'm low, I keep boiling another 10-20 min. then start the finishing hops. If I'm high, I add water.  It requires you to make a guess, but there's nothing tricky about it.
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Offline redrocker652002

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Re: Thinking of trying this
« Reply #17 on: February 15, 2022, 08:40:49 am »
Have you ever thought of getting 3 gallon kegs for your small batches? I started doing small batches on my kitchen stove in the winter just so I could brew when it was too cold in the garage on my big system. I had not bottled in nearly 15 years and I quickly discovered I still hated bottling no matter how small the batch was.

I have thought of that, but my mini fridge isn't quite big enough I don't think to hold the 5 gallon torpedo and a 3 gallon mini.  And, on top of that, I would have to fool with the lines and tap.  My reason for bottling is two fold.  I can store a few bottles in my shop fridge and kitchen fridge and I am more just curious what the difference is taste wise, if any.  But, I my end game is to get either a bigger fridge or a used chest freezer and convert that to a multi tap kegerator to have 2 or 3 styles of beer on tap.  But, that is a bit away.  But, now you have me thinking of it, so I am going to check and see what I can find.  Thanks for the reply, I appreciate all input.  RR

Offline redrocker652002

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Re: Thinking of trying this
« Reply #18 on: February 15, 2022, 08:54:48 am »
So, I found a Elysian Space Dust clone recipe that I was thinking of trying.  Cutting the grain bill in half gave me about 8.375 pounds of grain.  Using the formula of 1.25 quarts of water to 1 pound of grain I come up with a little over 2.5 gallons of water I start with, which is my ending volume.  I know some of it will boil off during the boil, but does that sound about right?  I guess I can sparge a small amount of water thru the grains to make my boil amount to be about 3 to 3.5 gallons, right?  I am thinking of giving this a try next weekend just for the heck of it.

Yep, that will work.  You could also mash thicker and use more sparge water.  Hard to say if one is a better choice than the other.

Thank Denny, I appreciate your input.  I guess if I come up short I can always just add water to the wort when it goes into the fermenter, right?  My goal is to have a little over 2.5 gallons in the fermenter and 2.5 gallons at the end to bottle and have as a second beer.  If I like it, then I will do a 5 gallon batch when my keg is empty.  LOL.

Personally, I brew to gravity, not volume. My own decision to add water is based on if I'm over gravity, not under volume.

Thanks, I guess I have not gotten that good yet.  LOL.  I am working on it though

Well, here's how I do it...nothing too difficult. About 15-20 minutes before what I estimate will be the end of boil, before I add any finishing hops, I take a gravity reading. If I'm low, I keep boiling another 10-20 min. then start the finishing hops. If I'm high, I add water.  It requires you to make a guess, but there's nothing tricky about it.

OK, cool.  I will give that a try.  That leads to another question though.  If I have to boil longer won't I end up having to add water anyway to get to my final volume?  Or am I leaving it be and adjusting the boil volume next time to compensate for the lower gravity? 

Offline denny

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Re: Thinking of trying this
« Reply #19 on: February 15, 2022, 09:22:17 am »
So, I found a Elysian Space Dust clone recipe that I was thinking of trying.  Cutting the grain bill in half gave me about 8.375 pounds of grain.  Using the formula of 1.25 quarts of water to 1 pound of grain I come up with a little over 2.5 gallons of water I start with, which is my ending volume.  I know some of it will boil off during the boil, but does that sound about right?  I guess I can sparge a small amount of water thru the grains to make my boil amount to be about 3 to 3.5 gallons, right?  I am thinking of giving this a try next weekend just for the heck of it.

Yep, that will work.  You could also mash thicker and use more sparge water.  Hard to say if one is a better choice than the other.

Thank Denny, I appreciate your input.  I guess if I come up short I can always just add water to the wort when it goes into the fermenter, right?  My goal is to have a little over 2.5 gallons in the fermenter and 2.5 gallons at the end to bottle and have as a second beer.  If I like it, then I will do a 5 gallon batch when my keg is empty.  LOL.

Personally, I brew to gravity, not volume. My own decision to add water is based on if I'm over gravity, not under volume.

Thanks, I guess I have not gotten that good yet.  LOL.  I am working on it though

Well, here's how I do it...nothing too difficult. About 15-20 minutes before what I estimate will be the end of boil, before I add any finishing hops, I take a gravity reading. If I'm low, I keep boiling another 10-20 min. then start the finishing hops. If I'm high, I add water.  It requires you to make a guess, but there's nothing tricky about it.

OK, cool.  I will give that a try.  That leads to another question though.  If I have to boil longer won't I end up having to add water anyway to get to my final volume?  Or am I leaving it be and adjusting the boil volume next time to compensate for the lower gravity?

If you add water, you'll reduce the gravity, getting you into a circle.  The point is, don't worry about volume, worry about gravity.  That way you get the beer you want....maybe less of it, but it tastes right.
Life begins at 60.....1.060, that is!

www.dennybrew.com

The best, sharpest, funniest, weirdest and most knowledgable minds in home brewing contribute on the AHA forum. - Alewyfe

"The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves, and wiser people so full of doubts." - Bertrand Russell