Membership questions? Log in issues? Email info@brewersassociation.org

Author Topic: Decant  (Read 4080 times)

Fire Rooster

  • Guest
« Last Edit: December 17, 2022, 04:17:00 am by Fire Rooster »

Offline BrewBama

  • Official Poobah of No Life. (I Got Ban Hammered by Drew)
  • *********
  • Posts: 6170
Re: Decant
« Reply #31 on: December 17, 2022, 04:17:04 am »
He was/is(?) a long time member here who has extensive knowledge concerning yeast. He introduced us to the Shaken, not Stirred (SnS) method of yeast starter that so many here use.

Offline dmtaylor

  • Official Poobah of No Life. (I Got Ban Hammered by Drew)
  • *********
  • Posts: 4761
  • Lord Idiot the Lazy
    • YEAST MASTER Perma-Living
Re: Decant
« Reply #32 on: December 17, 2022, 05:10:56 am »
I never knew his last name until now.  I think he always went by the monikers Saccharomyces or S. cerevisiae.  See link:

https://www.homebrewersassociation.org/forum/index.php?action=profile;u=96912
« Last Edit: December 17, 2022, 05:13:12 am by dmtaylor »
Dave

The world will become a much more pleasant place to live when each and every one of us realizes that we are all idiots.

Fire Rooster

  • Guest
Re: Decant
« Reply #33 on: December 17, 2022, 07:14:23 am »
Originally called yeast slurry part, grayish, in reality it's a light beige.

As it's settling in the fridge, the beige part is now reduced to 2 1/4 cups.
All of the slurry was collected, with a small amount of beer.

Cheers


« Last Edit: December 17, 2022, 07:32:24 am by Fire Rooster »

Fire Rooster

  • Guest
Re: Decant
« Reply #34 on: December 18, 2022, 05:09:16 am »
Thanks for the helpful responses.

It looks like the light beige part (yeast) will be about 2 cups (16 Oz's).
On brew day:
1.  Collected yeast will be taken out of fridge to warm up
2.  Beer on top poured out and discarded
3.  Spoon off and discard top layer
4.  Spoon off middle layer and save for starter, leaving bottom layer
         (guesstimate it to be between a 1/3 to 1/2 used for ale starter)
5.  Cool some wort before boil and use for starter.

A dark beige bottom layer in jar is not noticed, just beer and light beige yeast.
I believe since the double drop method was used, most if not all the settled gunk
was left behind, when pouring in fermenter with air lock.

Cheers
« Last Edit: December 18, 2022, 05:11:51 am by Fire Rooster »

Offline denny

  • Administrator
  • Retired with too much time on my hands
  • *****
  • Posts: 27317
  • Noti OR [1991.4, 287.6deg] AR
    • Dennybrew
Re: Decant
« Reply #35 on: December 18, 2022, 09:39:40 am »
Thanks for the helpful responses.

It looks like the light beige part (yeast) will be about 2 cups (16 Oz's).
On brew day:
1.  Collected yeast will be taken out of fridge to warm up
2.  Beer on top poured out and discarded
3.  Spoon off and discard top layer
4.  Spoon off middle layer and save for starter, leaving bottom layer
         (guesstimate it to be between a 1/3 to 1/2 used for ale starter)
5.  Cool some wort before boil and use for starter.

A dark beige bottom layer in jar is not noticed, just beer and light beige yeast.
I believe since the double drop method was used, most if not all the settled gunk
was left behind, when pouring in fermenter with air lock.

Cheers

No need to warm before using. It's actually better if you don"t.
Life begins at 60.....1.060, that is!

www.dennybrew.com

The best, sharpest, funniest, weirdest and most knowledgable minds in home brewing contribute on the AHA forum. - Alewyfe

"The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves, and wiser people so full of doubts." - Bertrand Russell

Fire Rooster

  • Guest
Re: Decant
« Reply #36 on: December 18, 2022, 10:20:49 am »
Thanks for the helpful responses.

It looks like the light beige part (yeast) will be about 2 cups (16 Oz's).
On brew day:
1.  Collected yeast will be taken out of fridge to warm up
2.  Beer on top poured out and discarded
3.  Spoon off and discard top layer
4.  Spoon off middle layer and save for starter, leaving bottom layer
         (guesstimate it to be between a 1/3 to 1/2 used for ale starter)
5.  Cool some wort before boil and use for starter.

A dark beige bottom layer in jar is not noticed, just beer and light beige yeast.
I believe since the double drop method was used, most if not all the settled gunk
was left behind, when pouring in fermenter with air lock.

Cheers

No need to warm before using. It's actually better if you don"t.

Why is that ?

Thanks

Offline denny

  • Administrator
  • Retired with too much time on my hands
  • *****
  • Posts: 27317
  • Noti OR [1991.4, 287.6deg] AR
    • Dennybrew
Re: Decant
« Reply #37 on: December 18, 2022, 10:58:28 am »
Thanks for the helpful responses.

It looks like the light beige part (yeast) will be about 2 cups (16 Oz's).
On brew day:
1.  Collected yeast will be taken out of fridge to warm up
2.  Beer on top poured out and discarded
3.  Spoon off and discard top layer
4.  Spoon off middle layer and save for starter, leaving bottom layer
         (guesstimate it to be between a 1/3 to 1/2 used for ale starter)
5.  Cool some wort before boil and use for starter.

A dark beige bottom layer in jar is not noticed, just beer and light beige yeast.
I believe since the double drop method was used, most if not all the settled gunk
was left behind, when pouring in fermenter with air lock.

Cheers

No need to warm before using. It's actually better if you don"t.

Why is that ?

Thanks

Warming it makes it more active. You don't want that to happen before the yeast hits wort. Not to mention it's unnecessary.
Life begins at 60.....1.060, that is!

www.dennybrew.com

The best, sharpest, funniest, weirdest and most knowledgable minds in home brewing contribute on the AHA forum. - Alewyfe

"The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves, and wiser people so full of doubts." - Bertrand Russell

Fire Rooster

  • Guest
Re: Decant
« Reply #38 on: December 18, 2022, 11:02:17 am »
Thanks for the helpful responses.

It looks like the light beige part (yeast) will be about 2 cups (16 Oz's).
On brew day:
1.  Collected yeast will be taken out of fridge to warm up
2.  Beer on top poured out and discarded
3.  Spoon off and discard top layer
4.  Spoon off middle layer and save for starter, leaving bottom layer
         (guesstimate it to be between a 1/3 to 1/2 used for ale starter)
5.  Cool some wort before boil and use for starter.

A dark beige bottom layer in jar is not noticed, just beer and light beige yeast.
I believe since the double drop method was used, most if not all the settled gunk
was left behind, when pouring in fermenter with air lock.

Cheers

No need to warm before using. It's actually better if you don"t.

Why is that ?

Thanks

Warming it makes it more active. You don't want that to happen before the yeast hits wort. Not to mention it's unnecessary.

That makes sense.

Thanks
Cheers
« Last Edit: December 18, 2022, 11:05:56 am by Fire Rooster »

Offline BrewBama

  • Official Poobah of No Life. (I Got Ban Hammered by Drew)
  • *********
  • Posts: 6170
Re: Decant
« Reply #39 on: December 18, 2022, 11:39:02 am »
I always set mine out on the counter as I’m cooling the starter wort. Just something I’ve always done in an attempt to get the yeast and wort nearer the same temp.



*Disclaimer*: Any comment I add is simply the way I brew beer. I am not paid or sponsored by anyone. There are certainly other ways that can be equally effective which other brewers may contribute. This is what I’ve found that works for me using my equipment and processes so I offer this for your consideration. YMMV

Offline denny

  • Administrator
  • Retired with too much time on my hands
  • *****
  • Posts: 27317
  • Noti OR [1991.4, 287.6deg] AR
    • Dennybrew
Re: Decant
« Reply #40 on: December 18, 2022, 12:01:47 pm »
I always set mine out on the counter as I’m cooling the starter wort. Just something I’ve always done in an attempt to get the yeast and wort nearer the same temp.



*Disclaimer*: Any comment I add is simply the way I brew beer. I am not paid or sponsored by anyone. There are certainly other ways that can be equally effective which other brewers may contribute. This is what I’ve found that works for me using my equipment and processes so I offer this for your consideration. YMMV

That's fine, but it's unnecessary and you may get better performance by not doing it.   You don't want to pitch warm yeast into colder wort, but cold yeast into warmer wort is actually a good thing.
Life begins at 60.....1.060, that is!

www.dennybrew.com

The best, sharpest, funniest, weirdest and most knowledgable minds in home brewing contribute on the AHA forum. - Alewyfe

"The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves, and wiser people so full of doubts." - Bertrand Russell

Offline denny

  • Administrator
  • Retired with too much time on my hands
  • *****
  • Posts: 27317
  • Noti OR [1991.4, 287.6deg] AR
    • Dennybrew
Re: Decant
« Reply #41 on: December 18, 2022, 12:03:28 pm »
I always set mine out on the counter as I’m cooling the starter wort. Just something I’ve always done in an attempt to get the yeast and wort nearer the same temp.



*Disclaimer*: Any comment I add is simply the way I brew beer. I am not paid or sponsored by anyone. There are certainly other ways that can be equally effective which other brewers may contribute. This is what I’ve found that works for me using my equipment and processes so I offer this for your consideration. YMMV

That makes sense also.
The question is how much of a temperature difference would affect the yeast ?

?

It can be a lot colder than the wort its going into, but not warmer going into colder. That's where negative effects of temp can show up.
Life begins at 60.....1.060, that is!

www.dennybrew.com

The best, sharpest, funniest, weirdest and most knowledgable minds in home brewing contribute on the AHA forum. - Alewyfe

"The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves, and wiser people so full of doubts." - Bertrand Russell

Fire Rooster

  • Guest
Re: Decant
« Reply #42 on: December 18, 2022, 12:42:35 pm »
It's my current belief that the middle of the yeast cake is the most viable,
not top or bottom.

Is this true ?

Thanks

Offline BrewBama

  • Official Poobah of No Life. (I Got Ban Hammered by Drew)
  • *********
  • Posts: 6170
Decant
« Reply #43 on: December 18, 2022, 01:04:41 pm »
I have no idea if this is factual — I believe the bottom yeast is the fast start, but early floc yeast. The middle is the sure and steady, heavy lifting, see it thru to the finish yeast. The top is the stubborn residual yeast that cleans up byproducts and carbs the beer.

I want the benefit of it all: fast starts, sure and steady, and residual clean up.
« Last Edit: December 18, 2022, 01:08:18 pm by BrewBama »

Offline denny

  • Administrator
  • Retired with too much time on my hands
  • *****
  • Posts: 27317
  • Noti OR [1991.4, 287.6deg] AR
    • Dennybrew
Re: Decant
« Reply #44 on: December 18, 2022, 01:12:52 pm »
It's my current belief that the middle of the yeast cake is the most viable,
not top or bottom.

Is this true ?

Thanks

Who knows? Certainly not me. I just use it all and there's no problem.
Life begins at 60.....1.060, that is!

www.dennybrew.com

The best, sharpest, funniest, weirdest and most knowledgable minds in home brewing contribute on the AHA forum. - Alewyfe

"The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves, and wiser people so full of doubts." - Bertrand Russell