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Author Topic: How much corn sugar?  (Read 2058 times)

Offline nvshooter2276

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How much corn sugar?
« on: April 30, 2023, 11:07:25 am »
I've seen four ounces of corn sugar being used to carbonate five gallons of wort ready to be bottled. I've measured how much wort is lost below the spigots in my several fermentation vessels and decided that if I want to get at least six gallons to bottle, I'd have to have seven gallons to ferment. Considering that six gallons is 20% more than five gallons, would I want to use 4.8 ounces of corn sugar to prime? Maybe not so brazenly tempt fate and reduce the sugar to 4.4 ounces? I'd rather the beer be a little low on carbonation than to have it make a mess on the ceiling upon crackin' one open...

Offline denny

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Re: How much corn sugar?
« Reply #1 on: April 30, 2023, 11:16:41 am »
The amount of sugar to use is not solely based on batch size. You also have to account for the highest temp the beer reached
Life begins at 60.....1.060, that is!

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Online erockrph

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Re: How much corn sugar?
« Reply #2 on: April 30, 2023, 11:17:09 am »
Your best bet is to use a calculator to determine how much to add. 5 ounces is generally on the high side. Not "beer on the ceiling" or "bottle bomb" high, but quite carbonated. The actual amount you need depends on fermentation temp, how much beer you actually have in your bottling bucket (this was often less than the full 5 gallons for me), and what the style calls for.

There are several calculators, but here's one I like:

https://www.brewersfriend.com/beer-priming-calculator/
Eric B.

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Offline dmtaylor

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Re: How much corn sugar?
« Reply #3 on: April 30, 2023, 12:32:05 pm »
Considering that six gallons is 20% more than five gallons, would I want to use 4.8 ounces of corn sugar to prime?

Your statement above is exactly right. I have bottled more than 160 batches since 1999.  You don’t really need a priming calculator. Rather, you should add priming sugar based on your own experience and preferences for how much carbonation you want based on volume. Personally I use 0.84 ounces per gallon. THAT is all the "priming calculator" that I need.
« Last Edit: April 30, 2023, 12:45:42 pm by dmtaylor »
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Offline nvshooter2276

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Re: How much corn sugar?
« Reply #4 on: April 30, 2023, 01:03:08 pm »
Six gallons x 0.84 ounces of corn sugar per gallon = 5.04 ounces. I'm a political conservative and will apply that conservatism to the amount of corn sugar used come the day to bottle. I'm feeling confident that 4.4 ounces will be enough, but not too much. Knowing your calculation is good information for me...

Offline dmtaylor

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Re: How much corn sugar?
« Reply #5 on: April 30, 2023, 01:06:09 pm »
4.4 ounces will have pretty low carbonation, if used for 6 gallons.  But you do you.  Cheers.
Dave

The world will become a much more pleasant place to live when each and every one of us realizes that we are all idiots.

Fire Rooster

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Re: How much corn sugar?
« Reply #6 on: May 01, 2023, 03:58:39 am »
A small funnel is used and each bottle is filled with measured organic cane sugar (Florida Crystals)
before filling.  This method takes a little extra time but is much more precise.

In my opinion, planning for low carbonation then work your way up or down from there
is the way to go.  I can drink a low carbed beer, but not a seltzer or foam monster.

Cheers

Offline nvshooter2276

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Re: How much corn sugar?
« Reply #7 on: May 01, 2023, 09:10:38 pm »
... organic cane sugar (Florida Crystals) before filling...

What's your opinion of turbinado sugar for priming?

Fire Rooster

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Re: How much corn sugar?
« Reply #8 on: May 02, 2023, 01:49:33 am »
... organic cane sugar (Florida Crystals) before filling...

What's your opinion of turbinado sugar for priming?

In my opinion it would be fine.
I'm an all grain brewer, who only bottles.

I believe your referring to "sugar in the raw" which is darker due to being
minimally processed which retains more molasses.  White sugar has all of its
naturally occurring molasses removed, and sold as molasses.  Brown sugar
is white sugar with molasses added.  White sugars sometimes vary in shades
due to how efficient removing the molasses was.

With that being said (written) other than cost, I believe yeast consumes
all the sugars leaving very little, if any, flavors to remain.  I originally used
sugar in the raw, and switched to Florida Crystals because that's what was
more readily available at the super market.  Turbinado sugar comes in organic
versions too.  I now buy all organic foods when shopping, if the choice is readily
available.

if you fill each bottle individually with sugar, you can vary the amounts with a few
bottles to find your preferred carbonation level, instead of toasting a whole batch.
Pay attention if the measuring spoon is rounded or level.

Several keg in a short period of time, which is fine since in can completely ferment
out in the keg, and pressure can be relieved.  With bottling ensure fermentation is
completely finished by a steady FG for several days.  Bottling fermentable sugars,
then adding sugar to the bottle and sealing, is looking for trouble.  If checking gravity
often is an issue, let it ride for 2-3 weeks.  I did this for years before purchasing and
using my first hydrometer, which is a Tilt.

Be patient, carbonation will be different at 2 weeks vs 6 weeks.
In my opinion, bottled beers hit their stride around 2-3 months.
Quality of carbonation is improved by chilling beer in fridge for
at least 3 days before drinking. 

Phew
Cheers
« Last Edit: May 03, 2023, 05:35:32 am by Fire Rooster »

Offline chinaski

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Re: How much corn sugar?
« Reply #9 on: May 02, 2023, 05:37:04 pm »
I know that you didn't ask, but hey- it's forum, right?  Plain old white sugar from the paper sack that's probably in your pantry works too.  How's that for being conservative? 

Fire Rooster

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Re: How much corn sugar?
« Reply #10 on: May 03, 2023, 02:06:18 am »
I know that you didn't ask, but hey- it's forum, right?  Plain old white sugar from the paper sack that's probably in your pantry works too.  How's that for being conservative?

Agreed +1

Organic is obviously not necessary, it's a personal choice.
Plain old table sugar is fine. Personally I grab the organic cane sugar
when it's right next to the regular sugar.  For the amount used
the price difference is meaningless to me, for some it may.  I
use plain old regular table beet sugar to fill my hummingbird feeder,
and to date have received no complaints.

Then there's the debate with cane sugar vs beet sugar.  Beet sugar
is by far the most available in Europe and the USA, and is probably
what almost everyone has in their home.  I prefer using cane sugar,
and so does some confectioners, and drinkers of Coke.  I don't drink
Coke, but there are those who swear Coke is better made in
Mexico because it uses cane sugar.

Sugar beets grow in the ground, sugar cane grows above ground.

Cheers
« Last Edit: May 03, 2023, 07:28:38 am by Fire Rooster »

Offline pete b

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Re: How much corn sugar?
« Reply #11 on: May 03, 2023, 06:43:21 am »
I know that you didn't ask, but hey- it's forum, right?  Plain old white sugar from the paper sack that's probably in your pantry works too.  How's that for being conservative?

Agreed +1

Organic is obviously not necessary, it's a personal choice.
Plain old table sugar is fine. Personally I grab the organic cane sugar
when it's right next to the regular sugar.  For the amount used
the price difference is meaningless to me, for some it may.  I
use plain old regular table beet sugar to fill my hummingbird feeder,
and to date have received no complaints.

Then there's the debate with cane sugar vs beet sugar.  Beet sugar
is by far the most available in Europe and the USA, and is probably
what almost everyone has in their home.  I prefer using cane sugar,
and so does some confectioners, and drinkers of Coke.  I don't drink
Coke, but there are those who swear Coke is better made in
South America because it uses cane sugar, and not beet sugar.

Sugar beets grow in the ground, sugar cane grows above ground.

Cheers
I think that coke is actually made with high fructose corn syrup in the US.
Don't let the bastards cheer you up.

Fire Rooster

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Re: How much corn sugar?
« Reply #12 on: May 03, 2023, 07:27:10 am »
I know that you didn't ask, but hey- it's forum, right?  Plain old white sugar from the paper sack that's probably in your pantry works too.  How's that for being conservative?

Agreed +1

Organic is obviously not necessary, it's a personal choice.
Plain old table sugar is fine. Personally I grab the organic cane sugar
when it's right next to the regular sugar.  For the amount used
the price difference is meaningless to me, for some it may.  I
use plain old regular table beet sugar to fill my hummingbird feeder,
and to date have received no complaints.

Then there's the debate with cane sugar vs beet sugar.  Beet sugar
is by far the most available in Europe and the USA, and is probably
what almost everyone has in their home.  I prefer using cane sugar,
and so does some confectioners, and drinkers of Coke.  I don't drink
Coke, but there are those who swear Coke is better made in
South America because it uses cane sugar, and not beet sugar.

Sugar beets grow in the ground, sugar cane grows above ground.

Cheers
I think that coke is actually made with high fructose corn syrup in the US.

I stand corrected, your right.
At one time I believe they used beet sugar, before switching to high fructose corn syrup.
Also it's Coke made in Mexico, not South America.
I believe it has something to do with the influence
of sugar cane growers in Mexico.

Cheers
« Last Edit: May 03, 2023, 07:32:00 am by Fire Rooster »

Offline denny

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Re: How much corn sugar?
« Reply #13 on: May 03, 2023, 08:05:04 am »
There is no practical difference between cane and beet sugar.

Once again, I urge you to take beer fermentation temp into account for priming.
Life begins at 60.....1.060, that is!

www.dennybrew.com

The best, sharpest, funniest, weirdest and most knowledgable minds in home brewing contribute on the AHA forum. - Alewyfe

"The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves, and wiser people so full of doubts." - Bertrand Russell

Offline nvshooter2276

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Re: How much corn sugar?
« Reply #14 on: May 03, 2023, 02:41:36 pm »
I'll be fermenting at around 72 degrees. My electricity usage is rolled into my monthly rent, so I can have my A/C blasting all summer long and never be concerned about how high my power bill is going to be. Same for my gas for winter; same for my water and sewer bills. I asked years ago why I get no separate bills for utilities. I was told that when the Park was built in 1994, no meters for the individual spaces were put in. The Park pays one whopper of a bill every month for each of the utilities, while we who live here never see a utility bill. I've come to really like such a set-up...