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Author Topic: A couple whole leaf hop questions  (Read 1555 times)

Offline Steve Ruch

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Re: A couple whole leaf hop questions
« Reply #15 on: September 16, 2023, 08:45:48 am »
If you want to try out Willamette, I'd recommend a bitter. In particular, I'd use Ron Pattinson's 1957 Whitbread IPA recipe and sub in Willamette for all the hop additions.
I was happy with an American wheat beer that I brewed with willammette.
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Offline denny

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Re: A couple whole leaf hop questions
« Reply #16 on: September 16, 2023, 08:49:53 am »
If you want to try out Willamette, I'd recommend a bitter. In particular, I'd use Ron Pattinson's 1957 Whitbread IPA recipe and sub in Willamette for all the hop additions.
I was happy with an American wheat beer that I brewed with willammette.

That's a classic combo
Life begins at 60.....1.060, that is!

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Offline dannyjed

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Re: A couple whole leaf hop questions
« Reply #17 on: September 16, 2023, 03:35:47 pm »
Hop drying tip....for better quality,  dry at a higher temp for a shorter time. 135ish F for maybe 3-4 hours works great. It's what the people who grow your hops do.
This is true! I didn’t know this until my Club (Glass City Mashers) took over a small hop farm 3 years ago. We take our hops to  Mr. Wizards Hops in Michigan after harvest and they process, dry, test, and pelletize them. My wife and I have helped in all of the steps and I couldn’t believe how hot the drying bins were. They were well over 100 degrees.


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Offline denny

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Re: A couple whole leaf hop questions
« Reply #18 on: September 16, 2023, 03:52:18 pm »
Hop drying tip....for better quality,  dry at a higher temp for a shorter time. 135ish F for maybe 3-4 hours works great. It's what the people who grow your hops do.
This is true! I didn’t know this until my Club (Glass City Mashers) took over a small hop farm 3 years ago. We take our hops to  Mr. Wizards Hops in Michigan after harvest and they process, dry, test, and pelletize them. My wife and I have helped in all of the steps and I couldn’t believe how hot the drying bins were. They were well over 100 degrees.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

When I was at harvest a couple  weeks ago I actually took pics of computer screens and thermometers showing the drying temps so people could see how it's really done.
Life begins at 60.....1.060, that is!

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The best, sharpest, funniest, weirdest and most knowledgable minds in home brewing contribute on the AHA forum. - Alewyfe

"The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves, and wiser people so full of doubts." - Bertrand Russell

Offline Skeeter686

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Re: A couple whole leaf hop questions
« Reply #19 on: September 17, 2023, 05:12:21 pm »
Hop drying tip....for better quality,  dry at a higher temp for a shorter time. 135ish F for maybe 3-4 hours works great. It's what the people who grow your hops do.
This is true! I didn’t know this until my Club (Glass City Mashers) took over a small hop farm 3 years ago. We take our hops to  Mr. Wizards Hops in Michigan after harvest and they process, dry, test, and pelletize them. My wife and I have helped in all of the steps and I couldn’t believe how hot the drying bins were. They were well over 100 degrees.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

When I was at harvest a couple  weeks ago I actually took pics of computer screens and thermometers showing the drying temps so people could see how it's really done.
How counterintuitive.  I just did mine using the low "herbs and spices" setting on my dehydrator because that sounded like the appropriate setting to use for hops. Gentle heat and all.

Offline denny

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Re: A couple whole leaf hop questions
« Reply #20 on: September 18, 2023, 08:22:03 am »
Hop drying tip....for better quality,  dry at a higher temp for a shorter time. 135ish F for maybe 3-4 hours works great. It's what the people who grow your hops do.
This is true! I didn’t know this until my Club (Glass City Mashers) took over a small hop farm 3 years ago. We take our hops to  Mr. Wizards Hops in Michigan after harvest and they process, dry, test, and pelletize them. My wife and I have helped in all of the steps and I couldn’t believe how hot the drying bins were. They were well over 100 degrees.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

When I was at harvest a couple  weeks ago I actually took pics of computer screens and thermometers showing the drying temps so people could see how it's really done.
How counterintuitive.  I just did mine using the low "herbs and spices" setting on my dehydrator because that sounded like the appropriate setting to use for hops. Gentle heat and all.

It might seem like it, but that's not the best way.
Life begins at 60.....1.060, that is!

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"The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves, and wiser people so full of doubts." - Bertrand Russell

Offline dmtaylor

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Re: A couple whole leaf hop questions
« Reply #21 on: September 18, 2023, 08:42:42 am »
I wonder if the exact temperatures involved are the key.  If most of the good volatiles don't leave the hops until ~140 or 150 F, then as long as they have careful controls, they can get away with heating at 135 F for a short time.  However, at home I know my oven doesn't even let me set it below like 170-175 F, which would not be a good thing if I lose a lot more volatiles at that temperature.  And I think for many ovens, the temperature would be very unstable at low temps, so you'd need an oven designed for low temps.

Long story short: maybe dehydrators are best for homebrewers.  Otherwise... Don't try this at home.
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Offline Richard

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Re: A couple whole leaf hop questions
« Reply #22 on: September 18, 2023, 09:01:22 am »
I wonder if the exact temperatures involved are the key.  If most of the good volatiles don't leave the hops until ~140 or 150 F, then as long as they have careful controls, they can get away with heating at 135 F for a short time.  However, at home I know my oven doesn't even let me set it below like 170-175 F, which would not be a good thing if I lose a lot more volatiles at that temperature.  And I think for many ovens, the temperature would be very unstable at low temps, so you'd need an oven designed for low temps.

Long story short: maybe dehydrators are best for homebrewers.  Otherwise... Don't try this at home.

I tried kilning some malt in my home oven and had big problems. Not only would it not go low enough, so I got Munich instead of Pale malt, I had to defeat the switch on the door to keep heat on with the door open. Even then the temperature was very unstable.
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Offline denny

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Re: A couple whole leaf hop questions
« Reply #23 on: September 18, 2023, 11:48:42 am »
I wonder if the exact temperatures involved are the key.  If most of the good volatiles don't leave the hops until ~140 or 150 F, then as long as they have careful controls, they can get away with heating at 135 F for a short time.  However, at home I know my oven doesn't even let me set it below like 170-175 F, which would not be a good thing if I lose a lot more volatiles at that temperature.  And I think for many ovens, the temperature would be very unstable at low temps, so you'd need an oven designed for low temps.

Long story short: maybe dehydrators are best for homebrewers.  Otherwise... Don't try this at home.

I've tried the oven and window screen/fan. Dehydrator is so much better there's no comparison. They're not very expensive, either.
Life begins at 60.....1.060, that is!

www.dennybrew.com

The best, sharpest, funniest, weirdest and most knowledgable minds in home brewing contribute on the AHA forum. - Alewyfe

"The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves, and wiser people so full of doubts." - Bertrand Russell

Offline chinaski

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Re: A couple whole leaf hop questions
« Reply #24 on: September 19, 2023, 05:30:16 pm »
I built an oast/dehydrator powered by one of those old-fashioned hair dryers that feeds warm air through a hose.  Works great and can hold a lot more hops that any dehydrator I've ever seen.  Plans are in the book "Homebrewer's Garden"

Offline Drewch

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Re: A couple whole leaf hop questions
« Reply #25 on: September 19, 2023, 06:17:14 pm »
Here's the Sui Generis dude's setup:

https://youtu.be/Ynlf4xs2j9Q?si=3fIb0mPFjmu5sJWJ
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Offline Joe_Beer

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Re: A couple whole leaf hop questions
« Reply #26 on: September 20, 2023, 04:49:53 pm »
If you want to try out Willamette, I'd recommend a bitter. In particular, I'd use Ron Pattinson's 1957 Whitbread IPA recipe and sub in Willamette for all the hop additions.

Sounds like a plan. Have a link to a particular recipe? Finding a few variations (https://www.brewersfriend.com/homebrew/recipe/view/1066722/1957-whitbread-ipa) and not sure what's authentic.

Offline Skeeter686

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Re: A couple whole leaf hop questions
« Reply #27 on: September 20, 2023, 07:26:26 pm »
I built an oast/dehydrator powered by one of those old-fashioned hair dryers that feeds warm air through a hose.  Works great and can hold a lot more hops that any dehydrator I've ever seen.  Plans are in the book "Homebrewer's Garden"
I'm imagining a big Chia Pet, with hops for hair, sitting under an old hair dryer from the 60s, and I'm LMAO! 🤣

Offline chinaski

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Re: A couple whole leaf hop questions
« Reply #28 on: September 22, 2023, 06:32:51 pm »
That's a lot cooler image than what it actually is.

Offline House Of Ales

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Re: A couple whole leaf hop questions
« Reply #29 on: October 08, 2023, 08:57:27 pm »
I dried my hops in the dehydrator at 95 degrees for 8-9 hours. Seemed to work good.