Author Topic: New to brewing and have some questions  (Read 1546 times)

Offline lex82

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New to brewing and have some questions
« on: January 04, 2011, 09:53:36 AM »
Hey Everyone,

I'm new to homebrewing and actually started my first kit on sunday (1/2/10). The kit was true brew's belgian ale and I hope it comes out great. While I was reading the instructions it says to let ferment for a week and bottle for three weeks. I read a review online of the same kit and they said they let it ferment for a week and bottled for only 10 days. Would it be ok for me to do the same thing even though the instructions say three weeks? As you can tell I have no patience at all, and would love to try it as soon as possible.

Thanks

Offline hamiltont

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Re: New to brewing and have some questions
« Reply #1 on: January 04, 2011, 09:59:15 AM »
I would let it ferment 3 weeks & bottle condition at least 3 weeks. One week in the fermenter may not be enough time & you could end up with bottle bombs.  Do you have a hydrometer?  That will tell you when the fermentation is truly done. Cheers!!!
If Homebrew & BBQ aren't the answer, then you're askin' the wrong questions... Cheers!!!

Offline lex82

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Re: New to brewing and have some questions
« Reply #2 on: January 04, 2011, 10:03:39 AM »
I would let it ferment 3 weeks & bottle condition at least 3 weeks. One week in the fermenter may not be enough time & you could end up with bottle bombs.  Do you have a hydrometer?  That will tell you when the fermentation is truly done. Cheers!!!
I do have a hydrometer, my OG was 1.052. When would I know it is truly done? The FG, if I can remember is supposed to be 1.010-1.013.  So when it's in that range it's done?

Offline stevo155

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Re: New to brewing and have some questions
« Reply #3 on: January 04, 2011, 10:07:48 AM »
I do have a hydrometer, my OG was 1.052. When would I know it is truly done? The FG, if I can remember is supposed to be 1.010-1.013.  So when it's in that range it's done?
If you're close to that range, and 3 consecutive days the gravity doesn't change, then you're probably done.

Offline denny

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Re: New to brewing and have some questions
« Reply #4 on: January 04, 2011, 10:22:14 AM »
You can hardly ever go wrong by waiting longer in homebrewing.  I'd suggest you wait 2 weeks, then take a gravity reading.
Life begins at 60.....1.060, that is!

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Offline lex82

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Re: New to brewing and have some questions
« Reply #5 on: January 04, 2011, 10:23:24 AM »
I do have a hydrometer, my OG was 1.052. When would I know it is truly done? The FG, if I can remember is supposed to be 1.010-1.013.  So when it's in that range it's done?
If you're close to that range, and 3 consecutive days the gravity doesn't change, then you're probably done.
Is it ok to keep opening my fermenting bucket to check the gravity? I thought it had to be free from o2?

Offline hamiltont

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Re: New to brewing and have some questions
« Reply #6 on: January 04, 2011, 10:41:04 AM »
I do have a hydrometer, my OG was 1.052. When would I know it is truly done? The FG, if I can remember is supposed to be 1.010-1.013.  So when it's in that range it's done?
If you're close to that range, and 3 consecutive days the gravity doesn't change, then you're probably done.
Is it ok to keep opening my fermenting bucket to check the gravity? I thought it had to be free from o2?
As long as you open it carefully & don't have a direct draft you're okay. The CO2 is heavier than O2 so no O2 should touch the beer. Just make sure everything is sanitized, including your hands.  Cheers!!!
If Homebrew & BBQ aren't the answer, then you're askin' the wrong questions... Cheers!!!

Offline oscarvan

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Re: New to brewing and have some questions
« Reply #7 on: January 04, 2011, 10:52:10 AM »
The noob speaks as the wise old men frown.....

I know the feeling, having been there a few months ago.... I want to taste this NOW...... ;D As I brew more I am slowing down and getting the patience I need Grashopper. Which is of course MUCH easier to do when you have a home brew in your hand..... ;D

You're getting numbers all over the place above, but the concepts are right. Wait until the gravity is stable for a few days then bottle, 8-10 days I have found is the minimum for my beers so far. (all "simple" ales)  Percentage wise not much happens if you let it sit longer. As far as measuring..... I have so far not gotten crazy measuring, just at bottling (kegging in my case). I use the "no visible activity" rule.

So bottle and try one in a few days, a few more days a few more days and you'll see they get smoother and clearer as you progress.

But there's nothing wrong with tasting a "green" beer you've brewed, personally I like the green taste. Yeast farts.....yum!

Now, the most important thing is.....BREW AGAIN.....because by the time this one peaks, the next one needs to be about ready to bottle!
« Last Edit: January 04, 2011, 11:24:02 AM by oscarvan »
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http://www.woodenshoemusic.com/WSBW/WSBW_All_grain_Setup.html
I brew WITH style..... not necessarily TO style.....

Offline lex82

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Re: New to brewing and have some questions
« Reply #8 on: January 04, 2011, 10:58:08 AM »
The noob speaks as the wise old men frown.....

I know the feeling, having been there a few months ago.... I want to taste this NOW...... ;D As I brew more I am slowing down and getting the patience I need Grashopper. Which is of course MUCH easier to do when you have a home brew in your hand..... ;D

You're getting numbers all over the place above, but the concepts are right. Wait until the gravity is stable for a few days then bottle, 8-10 days I have found is the minimum for my beers so far. (all ales)  Percentage wise not much happens if you let it sit longer. As far as measuring..... I have so far not gotten crazy measuring, just at bottling (kegging in my case). I use the "no visible activity" rule.

So bottle and try one in a few days, a few more days a few more days and you'll see they get smoother and clearer as you progress.

But there's nothing wrong with tasting a "green" beer you've brewed, personally I like the green taste. Yeast farts.....yum!

Now, the most important thing is.....BREW AGAIN.....because by the time this one peaks, the next one needs to be about ready to bottle!
I'll check the gravity when I get home and get my base line. I'm definately brewing again, I want to do a belgian tripel next.

Offline oscarvan

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Re: New to brewing and have some questions
« Reply #9 on: January 04, 2011, 11:26:09 AM »
The tripel will take longer, much longer. I have a "house" APA I brew regularly, I get it from brew day to very drinkable in under two weeks. This keeps me in suds. Then I am doing more time consuming beers alongside......
Wooden Shoe Brew Works (not a commercial operation) Bethlehem, PA
http://www.woodenshoemusic.com/WSBW/WSBW_All_grain_Setup.html
I brew WITH style..... not necessarily TO style.....

Offline euge

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Re: New to brewing and have some questions
« Reply #10 on: January 04, 2011, 12:57:01 PM »
Hey Everyone,

I'm new to homebrewing and actually started my first kit on sunday (1/2/10). The kit was true brew's belgian ale and I hope it comes out great. While I was reading the instructions it says to let ferment for a week and bottle for three weeks. I read a review online of the same kit and they said they let it ferment for a week and bottled for only 10 days. Would it be ok for me to do the same thing even though the instructions say three weeks? As you can tell I have no patience at all, and would love to try it as soon as possible.

Thanks

Based on the OG of 1.052 I'd say primary 7-10 days then bottle if gravity is reached and remains stable. Checking it after kreusen (foam) has dropped is a good time for a gravity reading.

You really need to pay attention to temps when you brew. This is a primary new brewer mistake along with racking too early by following a recipe's stated fermentation times- ie "secondary/bottle after 7 days..."

So what temperature is your brew fermenting at?
The first principle is that you must not fool yourself, and you are the easiest person to fool. -Richard P. Feynman

Offline lex82

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Re: New to brewing and have some questions
« Reply #11 on: January 04, 2011, 01:15:01 PM »
Hey Everyone,

I'm new to homebrewing and actually started my first kit on sunday (1/2/10). The kit was true brew's belgian ale and I hope it comes out great. While I was reading the instructions it says to let ferment for a week and bottle for three weeks. I read a review online of the same kit and they said they let it ferment for a week and bottled for only 10 days. Would it be ok for me to do the same thing even though the instructions say three weeks? As you can tell I have no patience at all, and would love to try it as soon as possible.

Thanks

Based on the OG of 1.052 I'd say primary 7-10 days then bottle if gravity is reached and remains stable. Checking it after kreusen (foam) has dropped is a good time for a gravity reading.

You really need to pay attention to temps when you brew. This is a primary new brewer mistake along with racking too early by following a recipe's stated fermentation times- ie "secondary/bottle after 7 days..."

So what temperature is your brew fermenting at?

70 to 72 degrees

Offline euge

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Re: New to brewing and have some questions
« Reply #12 on: January 04, 2011, 01:41:17 PM »
Ambient temp or actual beer temp? If it is the ambient temp the beer could be fermenting much higher- closer to 80F. Some strains of yeast tolerate this range better than others. I've fermented wlp570 in the 90's without nasty off flavors, but I wouldn't do it again.  :D Usually for ales though, keeping the fermenting beer in the 60's is advisable. There's tricks/methods of achieving this.  ;)

BTW welcome to the obsession and the AHA forum!
The first principle is that you must not fool yourself, and you are the easiest person to fool. -Richard P. Feynman

Offline lex82

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Re: New to brewing and have some questions
« Reply #13 on: January 04, 2011, 01:43:37 PM »
Ambient temp or actual beer temp? If it is the ambient temp the beer could be fermenting much higher- closer to 80F. Some strains of yeast tolerate this range better than others. I've fermented wlp570 in the 90's without nasty off flavors, but I wouldn't do it again.  :D Usually for ales though, keeping the fermenting beer in the 60's is advisable. There's tricks/methods of achieving this.  ;)

BTW welcome to the obsession and the AHA forum!
That's the temp on my stick on thermometer. Does that measure ambient temp or actual?

Offline euge

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Re: New to brewing and have some questions
« Reply #14 on: January 04, 2011, 03:44:23 PM »
Good job with the stick on thermometer. Already ahead of the curve. You should be ok.
The first principle is that you must not fool yourself, and you are the easiest person to fool. -Richard P. Feynman