Author Topic: Post your water report  (Read 135924 times)

Offline tshearer

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Re: Post your water report
« Reply #435 on: June 19, 2019, 02:24:54 PM »
Would love any advice.  Just got my Ward Labs report.  This water is from the ‘Water Store’ downtown.  Is 7.2 pH too high?  Anything look out of range?   -Thx

7.2 pH
28 Total Dissolved Solids (TDS) Est, ppm
0.05 Electrical Conductivity, mmho/cm
.3 / .3 Cations / Anions, me/L

6 Sodium, Na
< 1 Potassium, K
< 0 Calcium, Ca
< 1 Magnesium, Mg
< 1 Total Hardness, CaCO3
0.4 (SAFE) < 1 Nitrate, NO3-N
< 1 Sulfate, SO4-S
2 Chloride, Cl
< 1 Carbonate, CO3
15 Bicarbonate, HCO3
13 Total Alkalinity, CaCO3


Offline Robert

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Re: Post your water report
« Reply #436 on: June 19, 2019, 02:47:30 PM »
Looks like typical RO. (Very close to the profile Bru'n Water assumes for RO.)  Happy brewing!
Rob Stein
Akron, Ohio

I'd rather have questions I can't answer than answers I can't question.

Offline Virwill

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Re: Post your water report
« Reply #437 on: June 25, 2019, 07:08:01 PM »
New Castle, DE - Municipal Services Commission
June 1, 2019
4 wells, 1 treatment facility, carbon-filtered

Avg. Fluoride reading: 0.80 ppm
Avg. Chlorine reading: 1.20 ppm
Avg. pH: 7.5 (annual range: 6.7-8.2)
Temperature range: 50º-60.8º
Alkalinity, annual range: 18.3-18.9 ppm
Most recent test for water hardness: 26.6 mg/liter, considered soft (less than 60 mg/l)
Calcium: 12.2-16.1 ppm
Chloride: 61.2-95.6 ppm
Chlorine: 0.54-2.08 ppm
Manganese: 0.0021-0.0021 ppm
Magnesium: Not tested for
Sodium: 22.9-25.5 ppm
Sulfate: 9.5-14.2
Zinc: 0.0278-0.0278

It's fairly tasteless water but there's something that my Brita filters out of our drinking water, so it's probably the chlorine. I've brewed only with spring and distilled water so far but I'm going to give this stuff a go in a test batch this summer. Thoughts, anyone?

Offline hopfenundmalz

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Re: Post your water report
« Reply #438 on: June 25, 2019, 10:29:22 PM »
Would love any advice.  Just got my Ward Labs report.  This water is from the ‘Water Store’ downtown.  Is 7.2 pH too high?  Anything look out of range?   -Thx

7.2 pH
28 Total Dissolved Solids (TDS) Est, ppm
0.05 Electrical Conductivity, mmho/cm
.3 / .3 Cations / Anions, me/L

6 Sodium, Na
< 1 Potassium, K
< 0 Calcium, Ca
< 1 Magnesium, Mg
< 1 Total Hardness, CaCO3
0.4 (SAFE) < 1 Nitrate, NO3-N
< 1 Sulfate, SO4-S
2 Chloride, Cl
< 1 Carbonate, CO3
15 Bicarbonate, HCO3
13 Total Alkalinity, CaCO3
pH of the water does not count for much, the malt will take that pH down in the mash. You want to add some Calcium for most beers.

A water spreadsheet will help you decide what to do for the beer you are brewing.
Jeff Rankert
Ann Arbor Brewers Guild
AHA Governing Committee
BJCP National
Home-brewing, not just a hobby, it is a lifestyle!

Offline Megary

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Re: Post your water report
« Reply #439 on: Today at 12:51:32 AM »
From a 500’ well in NE PA. This is what I got back from Ward Labs:



So what’s the best way to add sulfate?  Gypsum?


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Offline hopfenundmalz

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Re: Post your water report
« Reply #440 on: Today at 01:16:39 AM »
From a 500’ well in NE PA. This is what I got back from Ward Labs:



So what’s the best way to add sulfate?  Gypsum?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Yes, gypsum. You can add some Epsom salt, but keep those Mg levels low.
Jeff Rankert
Ann Arbor Brewers Guild
AHA Governing Committee
BJCP National
Home-brewing, not just a hobby, it is a lifestyle!

Offline Robert

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Re: Post your water report
« Reply #441 on: Today at 01:21:31 AM »


From a 500’ well in NE PA. This is what I got back from Ward Labs:



So what’s the best way to add sulfate?  Gypsum?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Yes, gypsum. You can add some Epsom salt, but keep those Mg levels low.

Agree.  Malt itself provides all the magnesium that's really needed, and it can lend an unpleasant taste in any quantity.  Calcium is the magic dust of brewing anyway, so gypsum is the way to go.
Rob Stein
Akron, Ohio

I'd rather have questions I can't answer than answers I can't question.

Offline Robert

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Re: Post your water report
« Reply #442 on: Today at 01:35:46 AM »


New Castle, DE - Municipal Services Commission
June 1, 2019
4 wells, 1 treatment facility, carbon-filtered

Avg. Fluoride reading: 0.80 ppm
Avg. Chlorine reading: 1.20 ppm
Avg. pH: 7.5 (annual range: 6.7-8.2)
Temperature range: 50º-60.8º
Alkalinity, annual range: 18.3-18.9 ppm
Most recent test for water hardness: 26.6 mg/liter, considered soft (less than 60 mg/l)
Calcium: 12.2-16.1 ppm
Chloride: 61.2-95.6 ppm
Chlorine: 0.54-2.08 ppm
Manganese: 0.0021-0.0021 ppm
Magnesium: Not tested for
Sodium: 22.9-25.5 ppm
Sulfate: 9.5-14.2
Zinc: 0.0278-0.0278

It's fairly tasteless water but there's something that my Brita filters out of our drinking water, so it's probably the chlorine. I've brewed only with spring and distilled water so far but I'm going to give this stuff a go in a test batch this summer. Thoughts, anyone?

You'll definitely need to eliminate the chlorine, of course.   It would help if you knew whether your water plant used chlorine or chloramine.   A carbon block filter run at <1 gpm (gal/min) will eliminate chlorine, but you'll need to go up to10 times slower to eliminate chloramine, and a chlorine test kit to periodically confirm that the filter is still in good shape would be prudent.  Otherwise, Campden tablets or another form of potassium or sodium metabisulfite will eliminate either chlorine or chloramine instantaneously (1 tablet to ~20 gal) but be aware this will add small amounts of both sulfate and chloride, as well of course as sodium or potassium.  I would favor gypsum for adding calcium (you'll want at least 50 ppm) since you already have a fair amount of chloride.
Rob Stein
Akron, Ohio

I'd rather have questions I can't answer than answers I can't question.