Author Topic: Cold Filtering Pump vs CO2  (Read 205 times)

Offline tallanwt

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Cold Filtering Pump vs CO2
« on: December 10, 2017, 08:08:46 PM »
I've been cold filtering (after cold crash conical) using 1.0 micron filter w/ 5-7psig CO2. Filter clogs after 3-4gl xfer to corny keg; leading to filter changeout during racking. I tend to go thru 3 filters for 10gl batch. Another option I will try, dual filters together (5 micron primary, 1 micron secondary).
 I'm also considering use of March pump or self-prime pump but have concerns about aeration, heavy foaming in keg. If you've tried these filtering methods, pls. Let me know your results. 

Offline Thirsty_Monk

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Re: Cold Filtering Pump vs CO2
« Reply #1 on: December 12, 2017, 08:00:08 PM »
If you insist on filtering try to filter with 5 micron filter only. Also your filter medium longevity is dependent on how “clean” the filtered beer is. Try to find it with gelatin or increase your surface area. 


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Offline Robert

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Re: Cold Filtering Pump vs CO2
« Reply #2 on: December 12, 2017, 08:54:00 PM »
Why are you filtering so tightly? I used to go 5 micron just because a guy recommended it when I first filtered.  Then LHBS ran out for a while and I used coarse (6-7 micron) pads and never went back.   Brilliant clarity, no stripping.
Rob
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Offline tallanwt

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Re: Cold Filtering Pump vs CO2
« Reply #3 on: December 13, 2017, 02:02:18 PM »
Aside from the struggles of cold filtering, I have been very happy w/ results of clear beer. Using only 5 micron filters would not yield same results. I'm not noticing any loss of aroma or flavor from 1 micron filtering. 10 gl is good up to at least 2 months, as this is how long it takes to consume it.

I have not considered any other fining agents, but will look into gelatin. Any flavor or clarity concerns here?

Offline Robert

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Re: Cold Filtering Pump vs CO2
« Reply #4 on: December 13, 2017, 02:21:39 PM »
I've found fining can actually add to the load on the filter, as gelatin can leave a rather fluffy sediment. I notice you're filtering right from the conical. I brew lagers, so they are pretty clear and the sediment quite firmly settled before filtering.  Could you include a period of cold storage (around freezing) between fermenter and filter? Less than 10 days could leave yeast as well as chill haze packed down pretty firmly and make your run easier without any fining agents.  And you might find you don't need to go so tight.   But that's just my thing, I'll leave it alone!
Rob
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"If it ain't broke, don't fix it."
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Offline Thirsty_Monk

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Re: Cold Filtering Pump vs CO2
« Reply #5 on: December 13, 2017, 07:59:54 PM »
It depends where you start racking from. If you put your heavy load to start from it will take longer time to filter.

Never filter rye, flaked barley or flaked oats.


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