Author Topic: Poured out that old Belgian  (Read 2837 times)

Offline tomsawyer

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Re: Poured out that old Belgian
« Reply #30 on: July 24, 2011, 06:31:20 PM »
The website is candisyrup.com.  I googled candisugar.com and got a realtor, she was cute but not that sweet.

I just ordered a pouch of each of their products, the description sounds good.
Lennie
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Offline cfleisher

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Re: Poured out that old Belgian
« Reply #31 on: July 30, 2011, 09:51:46 PM »
I agree with Gordon's suggestion about starting with lower temps than you'd expect. I just brewed a saison I thought was going to be perfect, but started it at close to 80 degrees (the temperature at which many people recommended) but I got some fusels. I think it would have been better to have started it lower (maybe 68-70 degrees) and let it warm up.

Also, I used to be way big into spices, but the best Belgians I've done have just been the result of careful attention to the yeast.
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Offline 1vertical

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Re: Poured out that old Belgian
« Reply #32 on: July 31, 2011, 08:31:25 AM »
Euge, sage advise coming forward here.  I would scrap the candi and go for the D2
when you are making a dubbel.. otherwise like in something lighter, candi prolly is a great choice.
I am partial to Jaggery for my belgians when I add sugar, else piloncillo which to me is very similar.

Gordon, I am getting good results with Best Maltz pilz and will prolly stick with that malt.

Also, I add a handful of wheat, and a handful of BELGIAN aromatic and a handful of Carafoam
2 are for the head and the other is for the aromatics....I do this to ALL of my belgians.

Saison yeast that really kicks butt is the WY 3711 it is a monster.  But when you use saison yeast
expect a saison beer.....
Likely, when you use trappist yeast stay in the trappist venue of beer recipes. 
Hops are not promenent IMO and I don't recall brewing over 40 IBU's in my calculations.
Just my $.02
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Offline andrew

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Re: Poured out that old Belgian
« Reply #33 on: July 31, 2011, 10:14:06 AM »
sorry to somewhat alter the subject on the thread but...

what about wyeast 3724? I know if you ferment too warm you get fusels, but the Temperature Range is 70-95F per the wyeast specs. I believe its the Dupont strain which is normally fermented closer to 90 as described in "Farmhouse Ales" and on the wyeast site.  I made a starter last night and thought about pitching at 65 and then letting rise into the mid to upper 80s. Kinda makes me a little nervous about it, but on the other hand Saison Dupont is pretty tastey! I had been using 3711, but this time I figured why not try the other one too? Anyone have any luck with it or does it turn out too fusely?
Andrew Tingler

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Offline 1vertical

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Re: Poured out that old Belgian
« Reply #34 on: July 31, 2011, 10:37:36 AM »
Andrew, This off topic thread may shed some light on that question.

Denny told me to let it (3724) ramp WAY up in temp He was NOT kidding.

http://www.homebrewersassociation.org/forum/index.php?topic=3250.msg37211#msg37211

It depends a lot on the yeast you use, too.  3711 works great in the low 60s.  But 3724 likes to finish in the 80s or even 90s.

And Euge this thread was put up a while back....did ya see it go by?
http://www.homebrewersassociation.org/forum/index.php?topic=3264.msg36837#msg36837
« Last Edit: July 31, 2011, 10:44:09 AM by 1vertical »
A fine is a tax for doing wrong. A tax is a fine for doing well.

Offline andrew

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Re: Poured out that old Belgian
« Reply #35 on: July 31, 2011, 11:11:12 AM »
Andrew, This off topic thread may shed some light on that question.

Denny told me to let it (3724) ramp WAY up in temp He was NOT kidding.

http://www.homebrewersassociation.org/forum/index.php?topic=3250.msg37211#msg37211

It depends a lot on the yeast you use, too.  3711 works great in the low 60s.  But 3724 likes to finish in the 80s or even 90s.

And Euge this thread was put up a while back....did ya see it go by?
http://www.homebrewersassociation.org/forum/index.php?topic=3264.msg36837#msg36837

thanks!  I guess I should have searched for it first... but since we were on the topic of belgians and to a lesser extent fusels I figured I would ask.

Andrew Tingler

In bottles or on tap: porter, quad, and wit
Secondary: empty
Primary: empty
On Deck: Blackberry Stout and Irish Red

Offline 1vertical

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Re: Poured out that old Belgian
« Reply #36 on: July 31, 2011, 11:15:57 AM »
It is all good.... :D
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Offline euge

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Re: Poured out that old Belgian
« Reply #37 on: July 31, 2011, 01:24:05 PM »
Thanks for the link! I hadn't seen it before...
The first principle is that you must not fool yourself, and you are the easiest person to fool. -Richard P. Feynman