Maltonator Doppelbock

ABV: 7.30%

IBU: 26

SRM: 22

OG: 1.072

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Yield: 5 gallons (19 liters)

The following beer recipe is featured in the November/December 2009 issue of Zymurgy magazine. Access this issue along with the archives with Zymurgy Online!

Doppelbock literally means "double bock." It is more extreme than a regular bock, but not twice so, with alcohol levels between 7 and 8 percent by volume. Its roots go back to the Paulaner branch of the Benedictine order of monks who were resident friars of the Dukes of Bavaria. Having witnessed strong beer-making in the noble brew houses, they tried their hands at the brew themselves, and soon this new and strong liquid bread became the obvious meal of choice for their frequent fasts.

The doppelbock is a strong, very malty German lager with appreciable alcohol, sweetness, and malt-driven flavors and aromas. Brewed correctly, this beer is an easy-drinker "brewed for holy nourishment," but it is often overdone, which can make it overly big and alcoholic, so avoid that if you can.

This recipe was featured in "Bavaria's 'Extreme' Lagers" by Horst Dornbusch in the November/December 2009 issue of Zymurgy.

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Yield: 5 gallons (19 liters)

The following beer recipe is featured in the November/December 2009 issue of Zymurgy magazine. Access this issue along with the archives with Zymurgy Online!

Doppelbock literally means "double bock." It is more extreme than a regular bock, but not twice so, with alcohol levels between 7 and 8 percent by volume. Its roots go back to the Paulaner branch of the Benedictine order of monks who were resident friars of the Dukes of Bavaria. Having witnessed strong beer-making in the noble brew houses, they tried their hands at the brew themselves, and soon this new and strong liquid bread became the obvious meal of choice for their frequent fasts.

The doppelbock is a strong, very malty German lager with appreciable alcohol, sweetness, and malt-driven flavors and aromas. Brewed correctly, this beer is an easy-drinker "brewed for holy nourishment," but it is often overdone, which can make it overly big and alcoholic, so avoid that if you can.

This recipe was featured in "Bavaria's 'Extreme' Lagers" by Horst Dornbusch in the November/December 2009 issue of Zymurgy.

Ingredients:

  • 9.5 lb. (4.32 kg) Weyermann Munich Type I (60%)
  • 5.5 lb. (2.5 kg) Weyermann Munich Type II (35%)
  • 0.75 lb. (0.34 kg) Weyermann Caramunich® I (5%)
  • 1.5 oz. (42 g) Hallertauer Mittelfrüh, Hersbucker, or Tettnanger, 4.5% a.a. (bittering)
  • Bavarian lager yeast (White Labs 833 German Bock or Wyeast 2124 Bohemian Lager)
  • 1 cup (237 mL) corn sugar or DME for priming

Specifications:

Original Gravity: 1.072

ABV: 7.30%

IBU: 26

SRM: 22

Boil Time: 120 minutes

Directions:

Dough in with 4 gallons (15.1 L) of 100° F (38° C) water and allow to rest for 1 hour. Infuse one gallon (3.8 L) of near-boiling water every 15 minutes (6 additions total), stirring thoroughly after each addition. Mash out at 172° F (78° C). Slowly run off the sweet wort, sparging as necessary, to collect 8 gallons (30.3 L). Boil hard for 2 hours. Let wort rest 30 minutes, then rack and chill to 45–50° F (7–10° C). Oxygenate and pitch a large starter of yeast. Ferment for two weeks or until finished. Slowly chill to 28° F (–2° C), then rack again. Lager at 35° F (2° C) for 18 weeks.

Extract Version:

Substitute 10.72 lb. (4.86 kg) of Weyermann Munich Amber Extract for the Munich malts. Steep the Caramunich.


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