Beer
Homebrewers Association
Homebrewers Association
Homebrew Recipes

Peanut Butter Jelly Time

According to the National Peanut Board, Americans eat enough peanut butter each year to make 10 billion peanut butter and jelly sandwiches. To celebrate National Peanut Butter Day (January 24), we’re sharing this homebrew version of the classic PB&J.

This recipe comes from AHA governing Committee member Drew Beechum. Tired of “the ubiquitous Peanut Butter Chocolate Porter/Stout” rendition, Drew wanted to try a different way to incorporate peanut butter into his homebrew. He describes that the “jelly” character comes from a fruity yeast choice, and that the malt choices were made to emphasize the bread and toast characteristics in the beer.

Using peanut butter can be tricky, as the lipids found in a traditional jar of peanut butter are a classic killer of head in beer. In this recipe, Drew uses a powdered peanut butter called PB2, which has been dehydrated and had the oils extracted from the peanuts by the manufacturer.

If you can’t seem to find powdered PB at the store, another way to do this is to decant the oil out in a jar of non-homogenized peanut butter at home. By letting the oil naturally separate out to the top of the jar, and then pouring it off the top every few days, you can decrease the oil and increase head retention in your beer.

This recipe first appeared in BeerAdvocate Magazine Issue 81.

Peanut Butter Jelly Time | Specialty Beer

Ingredients

  • For 5.5 gallons
    • 9.3 lb Maris Otter
    • 2.5 lb Rye malt
    • 0.5 lb Crystal 55L
    • 0.25 lb Aromatic malt
    • 0.75 oz Magnum 11.9% a.a. (60 minutes)
    • Peanut Butter extract (see instructions)
    • White Labs WLP002 English Ale yeast.

    Specifications

    • Original Gravity: 1.058
    • ABV: 5.7%
    • IBU: 28

    Directions

    Rest 60 minutes at 153°F.

    Blend 12 oz by weight of PB2 with 6 oz 150 proof neutral grain spirit. Blend well and then let sit for a week. Add slurry to the keg and allow it to age on the beer for two weeks, then transfer to a new keg for clear pouring